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Author Kuhn, L.; Johansson, M.; Laike, T.; Goven, T.
Title Residents' perceptions following retrofitting of residential area outdoor lighting with LEDs Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology
Volume 45 Issue 5 Pages 568-584
Keywords *Lighting; outdoor lighting; LED; light emitting diode; lighting levels; public opinion
Abstract The use of light emitting diodes (LEDs) in outdoor lighting has energy-saving potential, but users’ responses to this light source are largely unknown. An intervention study in two residential areas compared conventional lighting installations (high pressure sodium in Area 1 and high pressure mercury in Area 2) to a retrofitted LED-alternative regarding residents’ perceptions of quality of light, visual accessibility and danger. Moreover, energy use was calculated. Residents’ (N = 60) visual accessibility improved and perceived danger remained low in both areas after retrofitting. In Area 2 the perceived quality of light increased, whereas in Area 1 the results were mixed. The retrofitted application reduced energy use by 41–76% and might be a feasible alternative to conventional outdoor lighting in relatively safe areas.
Address (down) Environmental Psychology, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 280
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Author Gaston, K.J.
Title Sustainability: A green light for efficiency Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 497 Issue 7451 Pages 560-561
Keywords Editorial; Animals; Atmosphere/chemistry; Carbon Dioxide/analysis; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Conservation of Energy Resources/economics/*methods/*trends; Global Warming/prevention & control; Humans; Lighting/*economics/instrumentation/statistics & numerical data/*trends; Public Health
Abstract
Address (down) Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, UK. k.j.gaston@exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23719447 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 459
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Author Gaston, K.J.; Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Hopkins, J.
Title The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution: a mechanistic appraisal Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society Abbreviated Journal Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc
Volume 88 Issue 4 Pages 912-927
Keywords dark; information; light; moonlight; night; pollution; resources; rhythms; time
Abstract The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution have been a longstanding source of concern, accentuated by realized and projected growth in electrical lighting. As human communities and lighting technologies develop, artificial light increasingly modifies natural light regimes by encroaching on dark refuges in space, in time, and across wavelengths. A wide variety of ecological implications of artificial light have been identified. However, the primary research to date is largely focused on the disruptive influence of nighttime light on higher vertebrates, and while comprehensive reviews have been compiled along taxonomic lines and within specific research domains, the subject is in need of synthesis within a common mechanistic framework. Here we propose such a framework that focuses on the cross-factoring of the ways in which artificial lighting alters natural light regimes (spatially, temporally, and spectrally), and the ways in which light influences biological systems, particularly the distinction between light as a resource and light as an information source. We review the evidence for each of the combinations of this cross-factoring. As artificial lighting alters natural patterns of light in space, time and across wavelengths, natural patterns of resource use and information flows may be disrupted, with downstream effects to the structure and function of ecosystems. This review highlights: (i) the potential influence of nighttime lighting at all levels of biological organisation (from cell to ecosystem); (ii) the significant impact that even low levels of nighttime light pollution can have; and (iii) the existence of major research gaps, particularly in terms of the impacts of light at population and ecosystem levels, identification of intensity thresholds, and the spatial extent of impacts in the vicinity of artificial lights.
Address (down) Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9EZ, U.K
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3231 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23565807 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 14
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Author Ciocca, M.; Wang, J.
Title By the light of the silvery Moon: fact and fiction Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Physics Education Abbreviated Journal Phys. Educ.
Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 360-367
Keywords Vision; moonlight; Purkinje effect; Purkinje shift; mesopic
Abstract Is moonlight 'silver' or 'cold'? In this paper we discuss the interesting combination of factors that contribute to the common descriptions of moonlight. Sunlight is reflected from the lunar surface and red-shifted. When traversing the atmosphere, moonlight is further depleted of short wavelength content by Rayleigh scattering. We measured the spectra of the moonlight to show these effects and compared them with sunlight. All measurements, including spectral reflectance, suggest that moonlight is redder than sunlight. The silvery Moon is just an illusion due to the properties and behaviour of our own eyes, including the responses of rods and cones and the physiological perceptive phenomenon called Purkinje shift.
Address (down) Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY, USA E-mail: marco.ciocca(at)eku.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-9120 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2227
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Author Elvidge, C.; Zhizhin, M.; Hsu, F.-C.; Baugh, K.
Title VIIRS Nightfire: Satellite Pyrometry at Night Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 5 Issue 9 Pages 4423-4449
Keywords SNPP; VIIRS; fire detection; gas flaring; biomass burning; fossil fuel carbon emissions
Abstract The Nightfire algorithm detects and characterizes sub-pixel hot sources using multispectral data collected globally, each night, by the Suomi National Polar Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The spectral bands utilized span visible, near-infrared (NIR), short-wave infrared (SWIR), and mid-wave infrared (MWIR). The primary detection band is in the SWIR, centered at 1.6 μm. Without solar input, the SWIR spectral band records sensor noise, punctuated by high radiant emissions associated with gas flares, biomass burning, volcanoes, and industrial sites such as steel mills. Planck curve fitting of the hot source radiances yields temperature (K) and emission scaling factor (ESF). Additional calculations are done to estimate source size (m2), radiant heat intensity (W/m2), and radiant heat (MW). Use of the sensor noise limited M7, M8, and M10 spectral bands at night reduce scene background effects, which are widely reported for fire algorithms based on MWIR and long-wave infrared. High atmospheric transmissivity in the M10 spectral band reduces atmospheric effects on temperature and radiant heat retrievals. Nightfire retrieved temperature estimates for sub-pixel hot sources ranging from 600 to 6,000 K. An intercomparison study of biomass burning in Sumatra from June 2013 found Nightfire radiant heat (MW) to be highly correlated to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) Fire Radiative Power (MW).
Address (down) Earth Observation Group, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, Boulder, CO 80305, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 199
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