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Author (up) Fonken, L.K.; Weil, Z.M.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Dark nights reverse metabolic disruption caused by dim light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) Abbreviated Journal Obesity (Silver Spring)
Volume 21 Issue 6 Pages 1159-1164
Keywords Animals; Body Mass Index; Energy Intake; Gene Expression; Glucose Tolerance Test; *Light; Male; Mice; Obesity/*epidemiology/etiology; *Photoperiod; Weight Gain
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The increasing prevalence of obesity and related metabolic disorders coincides with increasing exposure to light at night. Previous studies report that mice exposed to dim light at night (dLAN) develop symptoms of metabolic syndrome. This study investigated whether mice returned to dark nights after dLAN exposure recover metabolic function. DESIGN AND METHODS: Male Swiss-Webster mice were assigned to either: standard light-dark (LD) conditions for 8 weeks (LD/LD), dLAN for 8 weeks (dLAN/dLAN), LD for 4 weeks followed by 4 weeks of dLAN (LD/dLAN), and dLAN for 4 weeks followed by 4 weeks of LD (dLAN/LD). RESULTS: After 4 weeks in their respective lighting conditions both groups initially placed in dLAN increased body mass gain compared to LD mice. Half of the dLAN mice (dLAN/LD) were then transferred to LD and vice versa (LD/dLAN). Following the transfer dLAN/dLAN and LD/dLAN mice gained more weight than LD/LD and dLAN/LD mice. At the conclusion of the study dLAN/LD mice did not differ from LD/LD mice with respect to weight gain and had lower fat pad mass compared to dLAN/dLAN mice. Compared to all other groups dLAN/dLAN mice decreased glucose tolerance as indicated by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test at week 7, indicating that dLAN/LD mice recovered glucose metabolism. dLAN/dLAN mice also increased MAC1 mRNA expression in peripheral fat as compared to both LD/LD and dLAN/LD mice, suggesting peripheral inflammation is induced by dLAN, but not sustained after return to LD. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that re-exposure to dark nights ameliorates metabolic disruption caused by dLAN exposure.
Address Department of Neuroscience and Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Wexner Medical Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA. fonken.1@osu.edu
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ISSN 1930-7381 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23666854 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 167
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Author (up) Fonken, Laura K; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J
Title Mice exposed to dim light at night exaggerate inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Brain, Behavior, and Immunity Abbreviated Journal
Volume 34 Issue Pages 159-163
Keywords animals; rodents; metabolism; health
Abstract The mammalian circadian system regulates many physiological functions including inflammatory responses. Appropriately timed light information is essential for maintaining circadian organization. Over the past ∼120 years, urbanization and the widespread adoption of electric lights have dramatically altered lighting environments. Exposure to light at night (LAN) is pervasive in modern society and disrupts core circadian clock mechanisms. Because microglia are the resident macrophages in the brain and macrophages contain intrinsic circadian clocks, we hypothesized that chronic exposure to LAN would alter microglia cytokine expression and sickness behavior following LPS administration. Exposure to 4 weeks of dim LAN elevated inflammatory responses in mice. Mice exposed to dimly lit, as compared to dark, nights exaggerated changes in body temperature and elevated microglia pro-inflammatory cytokine expression following LPS administration. Furthermore, dLAN mice had a prolonged sickness response following the LPS challenge. Mice exposed to dark or dimly lit nights had comparable sickness behavior directly following the LPS injection; however, dLAN mice showed greater reductions in locomotor activity, increased anorectic behavior, and increased weight loss than mice maintained in dark nights 24 h post-LPS injection. Overall, these data suggest that chronic exposure to even very low levels of light pollution may alter inflammatory responses. These results may have important implications for humans and other urban dwelling species that commonly experience nighttime light exposure.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1588
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Author (up) Forbes, C.; Hammill, E.
Title Fear in the dark? Community-level effects of non-lethal predators change with light regime Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Oikos Abbreviated Journal Oikos
Volume 122 Issue 12 Pages 1662-1668
Keywords Animals
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0030-1299 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 597
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Author (up) Franke, S.; Brüning, A.; Hölker, F.; Kloas, W.
Title Study of biological action of light on fish Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Light & Visual Environment Abbreviated Journal
Volume 37 Issue 4 Pages
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 698
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Author (up) Fritschi, L.; Erren, T.C.; Glass, D.C.; Girschik, J.; Thomson, A.K.; Saunders, C.; Boyle, T.; El-Zaemey, S.; Rogers, P.; Peters, S.; Slevin, T.; D'Orsogna, A.; de Vocht, F.; Vermeulen, R.; Heyworth, J.S.
Title The association between different night shiftwork factors and breast cancer: a case-control study Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer
Volume 109 Issue 9 Pages 2472-2480
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Case-Control Studies; Female; Humans; Life Style; Middle Aged; Questionnaires; Risk; Risk Factors; Western Australia/epidemiology; *Work Schedule Tolerance; Young Adult; oncogenesis
Abstract BACKGROUND: Research on the possible association between shiftwork and breast cancer is complicated because there are many different shiftwork factors, which might be involved including: light at night, phase shift, sleep disruption and changes in lifestyle factors while on shiftwork (diet, physical activity, alcohol intake and low sun exposure). METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study in Western Australia from 2009 to 2011 with 1205 incident breast cancer cases and 1789 frequency age-matched controls. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect demographic, reproductive, and lifestyle factors and lifetime occupational history and a telephone interview was used to obtain further details about the shiftwork factors listed above. RESULTS: A small increase in risk was suggested for those ever doing the graveyard shift (work between midnight and 0500 hours) and breast cancer (odds ratio (OR)=1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.97-1.39). For phase shift, we found a 22% increase in breast cancer risk (OR=1.22, 95% CI=1.01-1.47) with a statistically significant dose-response relationship (P=0.04). For the other shiftwork factors, risks were marginally elevated and not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: We found some evidence that some of the factors involved in shiftwork may be associated with breast cancer but the ORs were low and there were inconsistencies in duration and dose-response relationships.
Address Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:24022188; PMCID:PMC3817316 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 153
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