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Author (up) Juntunen, E.; Tetri, E.; Tapaninen, O.; Yrjänä S.; Kondratyev, V; . Sitomaniemi, A.; Siirtola, H.; Sarjanoja, E.M.; Aikio, J.; Heikkinen, V
Title A smart LED luminaire for energy savings in pedestrian road lighting. Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 47 Issue 1 Pages 103-115
Keywords Lighting
Abstract
Address
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 639
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Author (up) Kamrowski, R.L.; Limpus, C.; Jones, R.; Anderson, S.; Hamann, M.
Title Temporal changes in artificial light exposure of marine turtle nesting areas Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume 20 Issue 8 Pages 2437-2449
Keywords GIS analysis; artificial light; conservation planning; marine turtles; population resilience; temporal change
Abstract Artificial light at night poses a significant threat to multiple taxa across the globe. In coastal regions, artificial lighting close to marine turtle nesting beaches is disruptive to their breeding success. Prioritizing effective management of light pollution requires an understanding of how the light exposure of nesting areas changes over time in response to changing temporal and spatial distributions of coastal development. We analyzed multitemporal, satellite night-light data, in combination with linear mixed model analysis, to determine broadscale changes in artificial light exposure at Australian marine turtle nesting areas between 1993 and 2010. We found seven marine turtle management units (MU), from five species, have experienced significant increases in light exposure over time, with flatback turtles nesting in east Australia experiencing the fastest increases. The remaining 12 MUs showed no significant change in light exposure. Unchanging MUs included those previously identified as having high exposure to light pollution (located in western Australia and southern Queensland), indicating that turtles in these areas have been potentially exposed to high light levels since at least the early nineties. At a finer geographic scale (within-MU), nine MUs contained nesting areas with significant increases in light exposure. These nesting areas predominantly occurred close to heavily industrialized coastal areas, thus emphasizing the importance of rigorous light management in industry. Within all MUs, nesting areas existed where light levels were extremely low and/or had not significantly increased since 1993. With continued coastal development, nesting females may shift to these darker/unchanging 'buffer' areas in the future. This is valuable information that informs our understanding of the capacity and resilience of marine turtles faced with coastal development: an understanding that is essential for effective marine turtle conservation.
Address School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24353164 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 73
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Author (up) Kantermann, T.
Title Circadian biology: sleep-styles shaped by light-styles Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol
Volume 23 Issue 16 Pages R689-90
Keywords Human Health; Circadian Clocks/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; *Photoperiod; *Sunlight
Abstract Light and darkness are the main time cues synchronising all biological clocks to the external environment. This little understood evolutionary phenomenon is called circadian entrainment. A new study illuminates our understanding of how modern light- and lifestyles compromise circadian entrainment and impact our biological clocks.
Address Chronobiology – Centre for Behaviour and Neurosciences, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 7, 9747 AG Groningen, The Netherlands. thomas@kantermann.de
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23968925 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 501
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Author (up) Kayaba, M.; Iwayama, K.; Ogata, H.; Seya, Y.; Tokuyama, K.; Satoh, M.
Title Drowsiness and low energy metabolism in the following morning induced by nocturnal blue light exposure Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine
Volume 14 Issue Pages e166-e167
Keywords blue light; light exposure; light at night; circadian disruption; drowsiness; melatonin; metabolism; sleep
Abstract Introduction

Evening light exposure debilitates the circadian rhythm and elicits sleep disturbance. Blue light peak wavelengths, around 460 nm, suppress melatonin secretion via the non-image-forming system. The effects of nocturnal blue light exposure on sleep have been reported to be specific but rather small (Münch, 2008). This study was designed to assess the effect of nocturnal blue light exposure on sleep and energy metabolism until noon the next day.

Materials and methods

Nine healthy male volunteers aged between 21 and 25 participated in this study which had a balanced cross-over design with intrasubject comparisons. After 2 h dark adaptation, the subjects were exposed to blue light or no light for 2 h. The peak wavelength of the blue LED was 465 nm, and the horizontal irradiance of the blue light at the height of eye was at 7.02fÊW/cm2. Sleep was recorded polysomnographically, and energy metabolism was measured with a whole body indirect calorimeter.

Results

There were no significant differences in sleep architecture and energy metabolism during the night. However, dozing (stages 1 and 2) was significantly higher (26.0 < 29.4 vs 6.3 < 8.1 min, P < 0.05), and energy expenditure, O2 consumption, CO2 production and the thermic effect of food (increase in energy expenditure after breakfast) were significantly lower the following morning in the blue light exposure subjects.

Conclusion

Contrary to our expectation, sleep architecture and energy metabolism during sleep were not affected by evening exposure to blue light. It might be due to our milder intervention by which subjects in a sitting position did not gaze at the light source set on the ceiling, while the subjects in previous studies directly received brighter light via custom built goggles (Cajochen, 2005; Münch, 2008) or gazed at a light source under the influence of mydriatic agents to dilate pupils (Brainard, 2001). New findings of the present study were that dozing (stages 1 and 2) was significantly increased, and energy metabolism was significantly lower the following morning in blue light exposed subjects. This suggests that modulation of the circadian rhythm is affected by nocturnal blue light exposure and the effect continues in the following daytime even if the intervention was mild.
Address University of Tsukuba, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Japan
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 349
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Author (up) Kim, J.; Hwang, K.; Cho, J.; Koo, D.; Joo, E.; Hong, S.
Title Effect of bedside light on sleep quality and background eeg rhythms Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine
Volume 14 Issue Pages e170
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Artificial lighting has benefited society by extending the length of a productive day, but it can be ”light pollution” when it becomes excessive. Unnecessary exposure to artificial light at night can cause myopia, obesity, metabolic disorders and even some type of cancers.
Address
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 502
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