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Author Warrant, E.J.; Johnsen, S.
Title Vision and the light environment Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol
Volume 23 Issue 22 Pages (down) R990-4
Keywords photobiology; animals; physiology of vision; photodetection
Abstract Almost all animals, no matter how humble, possess eyes. Only those that live in total darkness, such as in a pitch-dark cave, may lack eyes entirely. Even at tremendous depths in the ocean — where the only lights that are ever seen are rare and fitful sparks of bioluminescence — most animals have eyes, and often surprisingly well-developed eyes. And despite their diversity (there are currently ten generally recognised optical types) all eyes have evolved in response to the remarkably varied light environments that are present in the habitats where animals live. Variations in the intensity of light, as well as in its direction, colour and dominant planes of polarisation, have all had dramatic effects on visual evolution. In the terrestrial habitats where we ourselves have most recently evolved, the light environment can vary quite markedly from day to night and from one location to another. In aquatic habitats, this variation can be orders of magnitude greater. Even though the ecologies and life histories of animals have played a major role in visual evolution, it is arguably the physical limitations imposed on photodetection by a given habitat and its light environment that have defined the basic selective pressures that have driven the evolution of eyes.
Address Department of Biology, University of Lund, Solvegatan 35, S-22362 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: Eric.Warrant@biol.lu.se
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ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:24262832 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 235
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Author Zamorano, J.; de Miguel, A.; Alfaro, E.; Martínez-Delgado, D.; Ocaña, F.; Nievas, M.; mez Castaño, J.
Title NIXNOX project: Enjoy the dark skies of Spain Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication In Highlights of Spanish Astrophysics VII Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue Pages (down) 962–970
Keywords Remote Sensing
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 982
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Author De Miguel, A.; Zamorano, J. M.; Gómez Castaño, J.; Ocaña, F.; Pascual Ramírez, S.; López Cayuela, M. A.,; et al.
Title ). Contaminaci{ó}n lum{í}nica en Espa{ñ}a 2012: Light pollution in Spain 2012 Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication In Highlights of Spanish Astrophysics VII Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue Pages (down) 956
Keywords Remote Sensing
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 926
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Author Bedrosian, T.A.; Weil, Z.M.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Chronic dim light at night provokes reversible depression-like phenotype: possible role for TNF Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Molecular Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal
Volume 18 Issue Pages (down) 930-936
Keywords Animals
Abstract The prevalence of major depression has increased in recent decades and women are twice as likely as men to develop the disorder. Recent environmental changes almost certainly have a role in this phenomenon, but a complete set of contributors remains unspecified. Exposure to artificial light at night (LAN) has surged in prevalence during the past 50 years, coinciding with rising rates of depression. Chronic exposure to LAN is linked to increased risk of breast cancer, obesity and mood disorders, although the relationship to mood is not well characterized. In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic exposure to 5 lux LAN on depression-like behaviors in female hamsters. Using this model, we also characterized hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and hippocampal dendritic morphology, and investigated the reversibility of these changes 1, 2 or 4 weeks following elimination of LAN. Furthermore, we explored the mechanism of action, focusing on hippocampal proinflammatory cytokines given their dual role in synaptic plasticity and the pathogenesis of depression. Using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, we identified a reversible increase in hippocampal tumor necrosis factor (TNF), but not interleukin-1β, mRNA expression in hamsters exposed to LAN. Direct intracerebroventricular infusion of a dominant-negative inhibitor of soluble TNF, XPro1595, prevented the development of depression-like behavior under LAN, but had no effect on dendritic spine density in the hippocampus. These results indicate a partial role for TNF in the reversible depression-like phenotype observed under chronic dim LAN. Recent environmental changes, such as LAN exposure, may warrant more attention as possible contributors to rising rates of mood disorders.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 386
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Author Menegaux, F.; Truong, T.; Anger, A.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Lamkarkach, F.; Arveux, P.; Kerbrat, P.; Fevotte, J.; Guenel, P.
Title Night work and breast cancer: a population-based case-control study in France (the CECILE study) Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer
Volume 132 Issue 4 Pages (down) 924-931
Keywords Human Health; Adult; Aged; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm; Employment; Female; France/epidemiology; Humans; Middle Aged; Occupations; Pregnancy; Risk Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract Night work involving disruption of circadian rhythm was suggested as a possible cause of breast cancer. We examined the role of night work in a large population-based case-control study carried out in France between 2005 and 2008. Lifetime occupational history including work schedules of each night work period was elicited in 1,232 cases of breast cancer and 1,317 population controls. Thirteen percent of the cases and 11% of the controls had ever worked on night shifts (OR = 1.27 [95% confidence interval = 0.99-1.64]). Odds ratios were 1.35 [1.01-1.80] in women who worked on overnight shifts, 1.40 [1.01-1.92] in women who had worked at night for 4.5 or more years, and 1.43 [1.01-2.03] in those who worked less than three nights per week on average. The odds ratio was 1.95 [1.13-3.35] in women employed in night work for >4 years before their first full-term pregnancy, a period where mammary gland cells are incompletely differentiated and possibly more susceptible to circadian disruption effects. Our results support the hypothesis that night work plays a role in breast cancer, particularly in women who started working at night before first full-term pregnancy.
Address Inserm, CESP Center for research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, Villejuif, France; Univ Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France
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ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:22689255 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 781
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