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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Iwamoto, J.; Ikada, Y.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to light at night and risk of depression in the elderly Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Affective Disorders Abbreviated Journal J Affect Disord  
  Volume 151 Issue 1 Pages (down) 331-336  
  Keywords Aged; Circadian Rhythm; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression/*etiology; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Melatonin/urine; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Risk Factors; Circadian rhythm; Daytime light; Depression; Elderly; Light at night; Melatonin; Mental Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Recent advances in understanding the fundamental links between chronobiology and depressive disorders have enabled exploring novel risk factors for depression in the field of biological rhythms. Increased exposure to light at night (LAN) is common in modern life, and LAN exposure is associated with circadian misalignment. However, whether LAN exposure in home settings is associated with depression remains unclear. METHODS: We measured the intensities of nighttime bedroom light and ambulatory daytime light along with overnight urinary melatonin excretion (UME) in 516 elderly individuals (mean age, 72.8). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale. RESULTS: The median nighttime light intensity was 0.8lx (interquartile range, 0.2-3.3). The depressed group (n=101) revealed significantly higher prevalence of LAN exposure (average intensity, >/= 5 lx) compared with that of the nondepressed group (n=415) using a multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for daytime light exposure, insomnia, hypertension, sleep duration, and physical activity [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.89; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-3.25; P=0.02]. Consistently, another parameter of LAN exposure (duration of intensity >/= 10 lx, >/= 30 min) was significantly more prevalent in the depressed than in the nondepressed group (adjusted OR: 1.71; 95% CI, 1.01-2.89; P=0.046). In contrast, UME was not significantly associated with depressive symptoms. LIMITATION: Cross-sectional analysis. CONCLUSION: These results suggested that LAN exposure in home settings is significantly associated with depressive symptoms in the general elderly population. The risk of depression may be reduced by keeping nighttime bedroom dark.  
  Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Nara, Japan. obayashi@naramed-u.ac.jp  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0165-0327 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23856285 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 165  
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Author Sciezor, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A new astronomical method for determining the brightness of the night sky and its application to study long-term changes in the level of light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society  
  Volume 435 Issue 1 Pages (down) 303-310  
  Keywords light pollution methods; data analysis methods; observational site testing; comets; measurements; light pollution; skyglow  
  Abstract In this paper, I present a new method that has been developed for determining the brightness of a cloudless night sky, on the basis of widely available amateur observations of comets. The tests show the correctness of the method, which makes it possible to determine the level of light pollution, defined as the brightness of the artificial sky glow, through the use of the archival observations of comets. The use of data bases of comet observations in Poland in the period 1994–2009 has led to a positive verification of the known model map of the brightness of the night sky. Also, it has been possible to find changes in the level of light pollution in this period, at the selected observation sites.  
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  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 266  
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Author Kocifaj, M.; Solano Lamphar, H.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Skyglow effects in UV and visible spectra: radiative fluxes Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage  
  Volume 127 Issue Pages (down) 300-307  
  Keywords Animals; Darkness; Environmental Exposure/*analysis; *Light; Models, Theoretical; *Ultraviolet Rays; Light pollution; Optical thickness; Public lighting system; Two stream approximation  
  Abstract Several studies have tried to understand the mechanisms and effects of radiative transfer under different night-sky conditions. However, most of these studies are limited to the various effects of visible spectra. Nevertheless, the invisible parts of the electromagnetic spectrum can pose a more profound threat to nature. One visible threat is from what is popularly termed skyglow. Such skyglow is caused by injudiciously situated or designed artificial night lighting systems which degrade desired sky viewing. Therefore, since lamp emissions are not limited to visible electromagnetic spectra, it is necessary to consider the complete spectrum of such lamps in order to understand the physical behaviour of diffuse radiation at terrain level. In this paper, the downward diffuse radiative flux is computed in a two-stream approximation and obtained ultraviolet spectral radiative fluxes are inter-related with luminous fluxes. Such a method then permits an estimate of ultraviolet radiation if the traditionally measured illuminance on a horizontal plane is available. The utility of such a comparison of two spectral bands is shown, using the different lamp types employed in street lighting. The data demonstrate that it is insufficient to specify lamp type and its visible flux production independently of each other. Also the UV emissions have to be treated by modellers and environmental scientists because some light sources can be fairly important pollutants in the near ultraviolet. Such light sources can affect both the living organisms and ambient environment.  
  Address ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 9, Dubravska Road, 845 03 Bratislava, Slovak Republic. kocifaj@savba.sk  
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  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23792881 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 265  
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Author Dacke, M.; Baird, E.; Byrne, M.; Scholtz, C.H.; Warrant, E.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dung beetles use the Milky Way for orientation Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages (down) 298-300  
  Keywords Animals; Beetles/*physiology; *Behavior, Animal; Cues; Feces; *Galaxies; Locomotion; Moon; Motor Activity; Orientation/*physiology; *Stars, Celestial; Vision, Ocular/physiology; Milky Way; insects  
  Abstract When the moon is absent from the night sky, stars remain as celestial visual cues. Nonetheless, only birds, seals, and humans are known to use stars for orientation. African ball-rolling dung beetles exploit the sun, the moon, and the celestial polarization pattern to move along straight paths, away from the intense competition at the dung pile. Even on clear moonless nights, many beetles still manage to orientate along straight paths. This led us to hypothesize that dung beetles exploit the starry sky for orientation, a feat that has, to our knowledge, never been demonstrated in an insect. Here, we show that dung beetles transport their dung balls along straight paths under a starlit sky but lose this ability under overcast conditions. In a planetarium, the beetles orientate equally well when rolling under a full starlit sky as when only the Milky Way is present. The use of this bidirectional celestial cue for orientation has been proposed for vertebrates, spiders, and insects, but never proven. This finding represents the first convincing demonstration for the use of the starry sky for orientation in insects and provides the first documented use of the Milky Way for orientation in the animal kingdom.  
  Address Department of Biology, Lund University, 223 62 Lund, Sweden. marie.dacke@biol.lu.se  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23352694 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 116  
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Author Tuttle, B. T., Anderson, S. J., Sutton, P. C., Elvidge, C. D., & Baugh, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title It Used To Be Dark Here Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 3 Issue 11 Pages (down) 287-297  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Nighttime satellite imagery from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) has a unique capability to observe nocturnal light emissions from sources including cities, wild fires, and gas flares. Data from the DMSP OLS is used in a wide range of studies including mapping urban areas, estimating informal economies, and estimations of population. Given the extensive and increasing list of applications a repeatable method for assessing geolocation accuracy would be beneficial. An array of portable lights was designed and taken to multiple field sites known to have no other light sources. The lights were operated during nighttime overpasses by the DMSP OLS and observed in the imagery. An assessment of the geolocation accuracy was performed by measuring the distance between the GPS measured location of the lights and the observed location in the imagery. A systematic shift was observed and the mean distance was measured at 2.9 km.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2520  
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