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Author Taylor, P.; Nimkingrat, P.; Strauch, O.; Ehlers, R.; Kiel, C. openurl 
  Title Biocontrol Science and Technology Hybridisation and genetic selection for improving desiccation tolerance of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema feltiae Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages (up) 37–41  
  Keywords Animals  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 622  
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Author Pottharst, M.; Könecke, B. url  doi
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  Title The Night and Its Loss Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Springer Netherlands Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 15 Issue Pages (up) 37-48  
  Keywords Economy  
  Abstract Artificial lighting is both a precondition and a consequence of the 24-hour society. It makes public spaces safer, allows a range of economic and social activities at night and influences the way goods production and services, buildings and entire cities are organised. Despite these achievements, from early on, critical voices have drawn attention to the negative impact of artificial lighting on humans, animals, cityscapes, landscapes and energy consumption. This has recently culminated in growing criticism of ‘light pollution’. This chapter investigates from a socioeconomic perspective the economic and social functions of artificial light, on the one hand, and the ‘loss of the night’, on the other, and outlines a preliminary taxonomy of relevant positive and negative effects of nocturnal artificial light. It is part of a joint research project on the ‘loss of the night’, which aims to develop new concepts of lighting to reduce light pollution.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 867  
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Author Hurley, S.; Nelson, D.O.; Garcia, E.; Gunier, R.; Hertz, A.; Reynolds, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A cross-sectional analysis of light at night, neighborhood sociodemographics and urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin concentrations: implications for the conduct of health studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Health Geographics Abbreviated Journal Int J Health Geogr  
  Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages (up) 39  
  Keywords circadian disruption; 6-sulftoxymelatonin; melatonin; aMT6s, DMSP; light at night  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is accumulating evidence that circadian disruption, mediated by alterations in melatonin levels, may play an etiologic role in a wide variety of diseases. The degree to which light-at-night (LAN) and other factors can alter melatonin levels is not well-documented. Our primary objective was to evaluate the degree to which estimates of outdoor environmental LAN predict 6-sulftoxymelatonin (aMT6s), the primary urinary metabolite of melatonin. We also evaluated other potential behavioral, sociodemographic, and anthropomorphic predictors of aMT6s. METHODS: Study participants consisted of 303 members of the California Teachers Study who provided a 24-hour urine specimen and completed a self-administered questionnaire in 2000. Urinary aMT6s was measured using the Buhlmann ELISA. Outdoor LAN levels were estimated from satellite imagery data obtained from the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP) Operational Linescan System and assigned to study participants' geocoded residential address. Information on other potential predictors of aMT6s was derived from self-administered surveys. Neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) was based on U.S. Census block group data. RESULTS: Lower aMT6s levels were significantly associated with older age, shorter nights, and residential locations in lower SES neighborhoods. Outdoor sources of LAN estimated using low-dynamic range DMSP data had insufficient variability across urban neighborhoods to evaluate. While high-dynamic range DMSP offered much better variability, it was not significantly associated with urinary aMT6s. CONCLUSIONS: Future health studies should utilize the high-dynamic range DMSP data and should consider other potential sources of circadian disruption associated with living in lower SES neighborhoods.  
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  ISSN 1476-072X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:24127816; PMCID:PMC3766028 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 142  
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Author Mace, B.L.; McDaniel, J. url  openurl
  Title Visitor Evaluation of Night Sky Interpretation in Bryce Canyon National Park and Cedar Breaks National Monument Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Interpretation Research Abbreviated Journal J. of Interp. Res.  
  Volume 18 Issue 2 Pages (up) 39-57  
  Keywords parks; interpretation; social studies; Bryce Canyon National Park; Cedar Breaks National Monument; dark skies  
  Abstract Natural lightscapes are an important resource for parks and protected areas, including Bryce Canyon National Park and Cedar Breaks National Monument. Both locations offer night sky interpretive programs, attracting over 27,000 visitors annually, equaling all other interpretive programs combined. Parks need to understand what drives visitor interest and park managers need to assess if night sky interpretation is meeting expectations. A total of 1,179 night and day visitors to Bryce Canyon National Park and Cedar Breaks National Monument served as participants and completed a 36-item survey measuring knowledge, attitudes, benefits, and behaviors related to the night sky. Results show those who attended a night sky interpretive program gained a significant amount of knowledge about night sky issues. Both day and night visitors have strongly held attitudes about light pollution and the protection of the night sky in national parks.  
  Address Department of Psychology, Southern Utah University, Cedar City, UT 84720 USA  
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  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 374  
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Author Kuechly, H.; Kyba, C.; Hölker, F. url  openurl
  Title Woher kommt das Licht? Räumliche Betrachtung der Lichtverschmutzung Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication In: Held, M., Hölker, F. & Jessel, B. (2013) Schutz der Nacht – Lichtverschmutzung, Biodiversität und Nachtlandschaft. – BfN-Skripten Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 336 Issue Pages (up) 39-42  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In der Nacht ist die künstliche Beleuchtung eines der deutlichsten Kennzeichen für menschliche Aktivität auf der Erde. Wie bei vielen anderen anthropogenen Umweltveränderungen sind auch bei der künstlichen Beleuchtung die unmittelbaren Vorteile weit offensichtlicher als ihre unerwünschten Nebenwirkungen. Auch wenn über ein Drittel der Menschen in Deutschland die Milchstraße noch nie mit eigenen Augen gesehen hat (Emnid & PM Magazin 2002), sind sich nur wenige der Nachteile der künstlichen Beleuchtung bewusst. Daher verwundert es nicht, dass trotz energieeffizienterer Technologien die Kosten für die künstliche Beleuchtung nicht zurückgegangen sind–vielmehr werden heute immer mehr Straßen und Wege, Gärten und Gebäude beleuchtet.

Aber woher kommt das Licht genau? Lichtquellen und Lichtintensitäten, die Verteilung und die zeitliche Veränderung von Lichtemissionen lassen sich sehr gut mittels räumlicher Datenerhebung identifizieren, darstellen und analysieren. Dieser Beitrag gibt einen kurzen Überblick über die Verfahren und diskutiert Möglichkeiten zur Quantifizierung von Lichtverschmutzung.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 898  
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