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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Wagner, J.M.; Kuechly, H.U.; Walker, C.E.; Elvidge, C.D.; Falchi, F.; Ruhtz, T.; Fischer, J.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Citizen science provides valuable data for monitoring global night sky luminance Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 3 Issue (up) Pages 1835  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The skyglow produced by artificial lights at night is one of the most dramatic anthropogenic modifications of Earth's biosphere. The GLOBE at Night citizen science project allows individual observers to quantify skyglow using star maps showing different levels of light pollution. We show that aggregated GLOBE at Night data depend strongly on artificial skyglow, and could be used to track lighting changes worldwide. Naked eye time series can be expected to be very stable, due to the slow pace of human eye evolution. The standard deviation of an individual GLOBE at Night observation is found to be 1.2 stellar magnitudes. Zenith skyglow estimates from the “First World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness” are tested using a subset of the GLOBE at Night data. Although we find the World Atlas overestimates sky brightness in the very center of large cities, its predictions for Milky Way visibility are accurate.  
  Address Institute for Space Sciences, Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin, Germany. christopher.kyba@wew.fu-berlin.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23677222; PMCID:PMC3655480 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 13  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Longcore, T.; Rich, C.; Mineau, P.; MacDonald, B.; Bert, D.G.; Sullivan, L.M.; Mutrie, E.; Gauthreaux Jr., S.A.; Avery, M.L.; Crawford, R.L.; Manville II, A.M.; Travis, E.R.; Drake, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Avian mortality at communication towers in the United States and Canada: which species, how many, and where? Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 158 Issue (up) Pages 410-419  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Birds migrating to and from breeding grounds in the United States and Canada are killed by the millions in collisions with lighted towers and their guy wires. Avian mortality at towers is highly variable across species, and the importance to each population depends on its size and trajectory. Building on our previous estimate of avian mortality at communication towers, we calculated mortality by species and by regions. To do this, we constructed a database of mortality by species at towers from available records and calculated the mean proportion of each species killed at towers within aggregated Bird Conservation Regions. These proportions were combined with mortality estimates that we previously calculated for those regions. We then compared our estimated bird mortality rates to the estimated populations of these species in the United States and Canada. Neotropical migrants suffer the greatest mortality; 97.4% of birds killed are passerines, mostly warblers (Parulidae, 58.4%), vireos (Vireonidae, 13.4%), thrushes (Turdidae, 7.7%), and sparrows (Emberizidae, 5.8%). Thirteen birds of conservation concern in the United States or Canada suffer annual mortality of 1–9% of their estimated total population. Of these, estimated annual mortality is >2% for Yellow Rail (Coturnicops noveboracensis), Swainson’s Warbler (Limnothlypis swainsonii), Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps), Bay-breasted Warbler (Setophaga castanea), Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera), Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum), Prairie Warbler (Setophaga discolor), and Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla). Avian mortality from anthropogenic sources is almost always reported in the aggregate (“number of birds killed”), which cannot detect the species-level effects necessary to make conservation assessments. Our approach to per species estimates could be undertaken for other sources of chronic anthropogenic mortality.  
  Address Communication towers; Mortality; Night lighting; Neotropical migrants; Collisions; Impact assessment; birds  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 54  
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Author Fonken, L.K.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim light at night increases depressive-like responses in male C3H/HeNHsd mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res  
  Volume 243 Issue (up) Pages 74-78  
  Keywords Affect/physiology; Anhedonia/physiology; Animals; Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Depression/*etiology/physiopathology; Hippocampus/*metabolism/pathology; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Neuropsychological Tests; Photoperiod  
  Abstract Daily patterns of light exposure have become increasingly variable since the widespread adoption of electrical lighting during the 20th century. Seasonal fluctuations in light exposure, shift-work, and transmeridian travel are all associated with alterations in mood. These studies implicate fluctuations in environmental lighting in the development of depressive disorders. Here we argue that exposure to light at night (LAN) may be causally linked to depression. Male C3H/HeNHsd mice, which produce nocturnal melatonin, were housed in either a standard light/dark (LD) cycle or exposed to nightly dim (5 lux) LAN (dLAN). After four weeks in lighting conditions mice underwent behavioral testing and hippocampal tissue was collected at the termination of the study for qPCR. Here were report that mice exposed to dLAN increase depressive-like responses in both a sucrose anhedonia and forced swim test. In contrast to findings in diurnal grass rats, dLAN mice perform comparably to mice housed under dark nights in a hippocampus-dependent learning and memory task. TNFalpha and IL1beta gene expression do not differ between groups, demonstrating that changes in these pro-inflammatory cytokines do not mediate dLAN induced depressive-like responses in mice. BDNF expression is reduced in the hippocampus of mice exposed to dLAN. These results indicate that low levels of LAN can alter mood in mice. This study along with previous work implicates LAN as a potential factor contributing to depression. Further understanding of the mechanisms through which LAN contributes to changes in mood is important for characterizing and treating depressive disorders.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. fonken.1@osu.edu  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23291153 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 95  
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Author Collison, F.M.; Poe, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title “Astronomical Tourism”: The Astronomy and Dark Sky Program at Bryce Canyon National Park Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Tourism Management Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Tourism Management Perspectives  
  Volume 7 Issue (up) Pages 1-15  
  Keywords Astronomy-related tourism; National parks; Night sky darkness; astrotourism; dark skies  
  Abstract Astronomical tourism represents a less-studied segment of sustainable tourism, where a dark night sky is the underlying resource. This article evaluates an astronomical tourism program, in this case at a national park with dark skies for observing. Bryce Canyon National Park (BCNP) in the southwestern United States has a well-developed astronomy program to serve visitors. The program consists of solar viewing during the day, multimedia evening programs, and night-time star gazing with telescopes. Depending on the specific measure used, it appears that up to 10% of park visitors may be involved with the formal Astronomy and Dark Sky Program and/or more informal astronomy activities. BCNP appears well positioned to take advantage of the dark sky attributes of the park and to educate visitors about the importance of maintaining and/or increasing the darkness of night skies. Potential future developments in the program may serve to further increase the number of visitors to BCNP.  
  Address School of Travel Industry Management, 1901 Ruby Lane, Liberty, MO 64068; collison(at)hawaii.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2211-9736 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 128  
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Author Tang, L.; Cheng, H.; Qu, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Estimating Provincial Economic Development Level of China Using DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Satellite Imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Advanced Materials Research Abbreviated Journal Amr  
  Volume 807-809 Issue (up) Pages 1903-1908  
  Keywords Curve Fitting; DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light; Economic Development; Provincial Scale; Regression Analysis; *Economics  
  Abstract How to estimate regional economic development level is important for solving regional inequality problems. Most of previous studies on regional economic development are based on the statistics collected typically in administrative units. This paper has analyzed the defects of traditional studies, and attempted to research regional economic development problems with 10-year DMSP/OLS nighttime light satellite imagery as a new data source. For exploring the relationship between DMSP/OLS nighttime light data and GDP, different types of curve fitting regression models have been tried, the Cubic model has shown the best performance with a coefficient of determination (R2) equal to 0.803. Based on this positive correlation, we have estimated provincial economic development level of China using DMSP/OLS nighttime light data. The research results have indicated that the DMSP/OLS nighttime light data can well reveal provincial economic development levels.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1662-8985 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 202  
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