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Author Cho, J.R.; Joo, E.Y.; Koo, D.L.; Hong, S.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Let there be no light: the effect of bedside light on sleep quality and background electroencephalographic rhythms Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med  
  Volume 14 Issue (up) 12 Pages 1422-1425  
  Keywords Eeg; Light; Polysomnography; Sleep; Sleep spindle; Slow oscillation  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Artificial lighting has been beneficial to society, but unnecessary light exposure at night may cause various health problems. We aimed to investigate how whole-night bedside light can affect sleep quality and brain activity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten healthy sleepers underwent two polysomnography (PSG) sessions, one with the lights off and one with the lights on. PSG variables related to sleep quality were extracted and compared between lights-off and lights-on sleep. Spectral analysis was performed to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep epochs to reveal any light-induced differences in background brain rhythms. RESULTS: Lights-on sleep was associated with increased stage 1 sleep (N1), decreased slow-wave sleep (SWS), and increased arousal index. Spectral analysis revealed that theta power (4-8Hz) during REM sleep and slow oscillation (0.5-1Hz), delta (1-4Hz), and spindle (10-16Hz) power during NREM sleep were decreased in lights-on sleep conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Sleeping with the light on not only causes shallow sleep and frequent arousals but also has a persistent effect on brain oscillations, especially those implicated in sleep depth and stability. Our study demonstrates additional hazardous effect of light pollution on health.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Division of Computation and Neural Systems, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24210607 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 141  
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Author Miller, S.; Straka, W.; Mills, S.; Elvidge, C.; Lee, T.; Solbrig, J.; Walther, A.; Heidinger, A.; Weiss, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Illuminating the Capabilities of the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 5 Issue (up) 12 Pages 6717-6766  
  Keywords Instrumentation; satellite imagery; nighttime visible/near-infrared; moonlight  
  Abstract Daytime measurements of reflected sunlight in the visible spectrum have been a staple of Earth-viewing radiometers since the advent of the environmental satellite platform. At night, these same optical-spectrum sensors have traditionally been limited to thermal infrared emission, which contains relatively poor information content for many important weather and climate parameters. These deficiencies have limited our ability to characterize the full diurnal behavior and processes of parameters relevant to improved monitoring, understanding and modeling of weather and climate processes. Visible-spectrum light information does exist during the nighttime hours, originating from a wide variety of sources, but its detection requires specialized technology. Such measurements have existed, in a limited way, on USA Department of Defense satellites, but the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite, which carries a new Day/Night Band (DNB) radiometer, offers the first quantitative measurements of nocturnal visible and near-infrared light. Here, we demonstrate the expanded potential for nocturnal low-light visible applications enabled by the DNB. Via a combination of terrestrial and extraterrestrial light sources, such observations are always available—expanding many current existing applications while enabling entirely new capabilities. These novel low-light measurements open doors to a wealth of new interdisciplinary research topics while lighting a pathway toward the optimized design of follow-on satellite based low light visible sensors.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 468  
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Author Forbes, C.; Hammill, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Fear in the dark? Community-level effects of non-lethal predators change with light regime Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Oikos Abbreviated Journal Oikos  
  Volume 122 Issue (up) 12 Pages 1662-1668  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0030-1299 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 597  
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Author Grundy, A.; Richardson, H.; Burstyn, I.; Lohrisch, C.; SenGupta, S.K.; Lai, A.S.; Lee, D.; Spinelli, J.J.; Aronson, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Increased risk of breast cancer associated with long-term shift work in Canada Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Occupational and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal Occup Environ Med  
  Volume 70 Issue (up) 12 Pages 831-838  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology/metabolism; British Columbia/epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Female; Humans; Menopause; Middle Aged; Occupational Diseases/*epidemiology; Ontario/epidemiology; Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism; Receptors, Progesterone/metabolism; Risk Factors; Tumor Markers, Biological/metabolism; Work Schedule Tolerance/*physiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Long-term night work has been suggested as a risk factor for breast cancer; however, additional studies with more comprehensive methods of exposure assessment to capture the diversity of shift patterns are needed. As well, few previous studies have considered the role of hormone receptor subtype. METHODS: Relationships between night shift work and breast cancer were examined among 1134 breast cancer cases and 1179 controls, frequency-matched by age in Vancouver, British Columbia, and Kingston, Ontario. Self-reported lifetime occupational histories were assessed for night shift work, and hormone receptor status obtained from tumour pathology records. RESULTS: With approximately one-third of cases and controls ever employed in night shift work, associations with duration demonstrated no relationship between either 0-14 or 15-29 years, while an association was apparent for >/=30 years (OR=2.21, 95% CI 1.14 to 4.31). This association with long-term night shift work is robust to alternative definitions of prolonged shift work, with similar results for both health and non-health care workers. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term night shift work in a diverse mix of occupations is associated with increased breast cancer risk and not limited to nurses, as in most previous studies.  
  Address Department of Public Health Sciences and Queen's Cancer Research Institute, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1351-0711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23817841 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 757  
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Author Clark, G.F.; Stark, J.S.; Johnston, E.L.; Runcie, J.W.; Goldsworthy, P.M.; Raymond, B.; Riddle, M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light-driven tipping points in polar ecosystems Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol  
  Volume 19 Issue (up) 12 Pages 3749-3761  
  Keywords Ecology; benthic; biodiversity; irradiance; macroalgae; marine ecology; polar; regime shift  
  Abstract Some ecosystems can undergo abrupt transformation in response to relatively small environmental change. Identifying imminent 'tipping points' is crucial for biodiversity conservation, particularly in the face of climate change. Here, we describe a tipping point mechanism likely to induce widespread regime shifts in polar ecosystems. Seasonal snow and ice-cover periodically block sunlight reaching polar ecosystems, but the effect of this on annual light depends critically on the timing of cover within the annual solar cycle. At high latitudes, sunlight is strongly seasonal, and ice-free days around the summer solstice receive orders of magnitude more light than those in winter. Early melt that brings the date of ice-loss closer to midsummer will cause an exponential increase in the amount of sunlight reaching some ecosystems per year. This is likely to drive ecological tipping points in which primary producers (plants and algae) flourish and out-compete dark-adapted communities. We demonstrate this principle on Antarctic shallow seabed ecosystems, which our data suggest are sensitive to small changes in the timing of sea-ice loss. Algae respond to light thresholds that are easily exceeded by a slight reduction in sea-ice duration. Earlier sea-ice loss is likely to cause extensive regime shifts in which endemic shallow-water invertebrate communities are replaced by algae, reducing coastal biodiversity and fundamentally changing ecosystem functioning. Modeling shows that recent changes in ice and snow cover have already transformed annual light budgets in large areas of the Arctic and Antarctic, and both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are likely to experience further significant change in light. The interaction between ice-loss and solar irradiance renders polar ecosystems acutely vulnerable to abrupt ecosystem change, as light-driven tipping points are readily breached by relatively slight shifts in the timing of snow and ice-loss.  
  Address School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23893603 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 850  
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