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Author Bedrosian, T.A. (ed) pdf  url
openurl 
  Title Circadian Disruption by Light at Night: Implications for Mood Type Book Whole
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords (up) circadian disruption; sleep; light at night; melanopsin; mood; mental health; Mood Disorders; epigenetics; red light  
  Abstract Life on Earth has adapted to a consistent 24-h solar cycle. Circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior remain synchronized to the environment using light as the most potent entraining cue. During the past century, however, the widespread adoption of electric light has led to `round-the-clock’ societies. Instead of aligning with the environment, individuals follow artificial and often erratic light cycles created by social and work schedules. In particular, exposure to artificial light at night (LAN), termed “light pollution”, has become pervasive over the past 100 years. Virtually every individual living in the U.S. and Europe experiences this aberrant light exposure, and moreover about 20% of the population performs shift work. LAN may disrupt physiological timekeeping, leading to dysregulation of internal processes and misalignment between behavior and the environment. Recent evidence suggests that individuals exposed to excessive LAN, such as night shift workers, have increased risk for depressive disorders, but the biological mechanism remains unspecified. In mammals, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) project light information to (1) the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus, regulating circadian rhythms, and (2) to limbic regions, putatively regulating mood. Thus, LAN has the potential to affect both circadian timekeeping and mood. In this dissertation, I present evidence from rodent studies supporting the novel hypothesis that night-time exposure to light disrupts circadian organization and contributes to depressed mood. First, I consider the physiological and behavioral consequences associated with unnatural exposure to LAN. The effects of LAN on circadian output are considered in terms of locomotor activity, the diurnal cortisol rhythm, and diurnal clock protein expression in the brain in Chapter 2. The influence of LAN on behavior and brain plasticity is discussed, with particular focus on depressive-like behavior (Chapter 3) and effects of SSRI treatment (Chapter 4). Effects of LAN on structural plasticity and gene expression in the brain are described, with emphasis on potential correlates of the depressive-like behavior observed under LAN in Chapter 5. Given the prevalence of LAN exposure and its importance, strategies for reversing the effects are offered. Specifically, eliminating LAN quickly reverses behavioral and physiological effects of exposure as described in Chapter 5. In Chapter 6 I report that administration of a pharmacological cytokine inhibitor prevents depressive-like behaviors in LAN, implicating brain inflammation in the behavioral effect. Finally, I demonstrate in Chapter 7 that exposure to red wavelength LAN reduces the effects on brain and behavior, suggesting that LAN acts through specific retinal pathways involving melanopsin. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the consequences of LAN, but also outline potential avenues for prevention or intervention.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience and The Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research The Ohio State University  
  Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor Bedrosian, T.A.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 323  
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Author Edensor, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reconnecting with darkness: gloomy landscapes, lightless places Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Social & Cultural Geography Abbreviated Journal Social & Cultural Geography  
  Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages 446-465  
  Keywords (up) Culture; darkness; illumination; perception; sensation; landscape; space; obscurité; illumination; perception; sensation; paysage; espace; oscuridad; iluminación; percepción; sensación; paisaje; espacio  
  Abstract This paper investigates the effects and affects of darkness, a condition that is progressively becoming less familiar for those of us in the over-illuminated West. In countering the prevailing cultural understanding that darkness is a negative condition, I draw attention to other historical and cultural ways of positively valuing darkness. Subsequently, in drawing on two sites, a gloomy landscape at a dark sky park in South Scotland, and a tourist attraction in which a simulation of New York is experienced in a completely dark environment, I explore the multivalent qualities of darkness. In foregrounding the becoming of sensory experience in gloomy space, I highlight the mobilisation of alternative modes of visual perception in as well as the emergence of non-visual apprehensions, and suggest that the potentialities of darkness might foster progressive forms of conviviality, communication and imagination.

Cet article interroge les effets et les affects de l'obscurité, une condition qui devient de moins en moins courante pour ceux parmi nous dans l'occident sur-illuminé. Pour s'opposer à la compréhension culturelle dominante que l'obscurité est une condition négative, j'attire l'attention aux autres façons historiques et culturelles de faire valoir l'obscurité. Ensuite, en tirant de deux sites—l'un, un paysage sombre à un parc de ciel obscure dans l'Ecosse du Sud, et l'autre, une attraction touristique dans laquelleon a une expérience d'une simulation de New York dans un environnement complètement noirci—j'examine les qualités polyvalentes de l'obscurité. En mettant en premier plan l'émergence de l'expérience sensorielle dans l'espace sombre, je souligne la mobilisation des modes alternatives de la perception visuelle ainsi que l'émergence des appréhensions non-visuelles, et je suggère que les potentialités de l'obscurité puissent encourager des formes progressives de la convivialité, la communication, et l'imagination.

Este artículo explora los efectos y los afectos asociadosa la oscuridad, una condición que resulta cada vez menos familiar para aquellos de nosotros que vivimos en unOccidentehiperiluminado.A los fines de contrarrestar la perspectiva cultural predominante que le asigna a la oscuridad una valoración negativa, pretendo llamar la atención sobre otras formas históricas y culturales que le otorgan un valor positivo a la oscuridad. Luego exploro las cualidades polivalentesde la oscuridad mediante el estudio de dos sitios: el paisaje sombrío de un parque sin iluminación artificial en el sur de Escocia y una atracción turística en el que se simula la ciudad de Nueva York, experimentada en un ambiente completamente oscuro.A los fines de dar cuenta del desarrollo de experiencias sensoriales en espacios sombríos, destaco la movilización de modos alternativos de percepción visual así como también la emergencia de formas de aprehensión no visuales Además,sugiero que la oscuridad tiene el potencial para promoverformas de convivencia, comunicación e imaginación progresistas.
 
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  ISSN 1464-9365 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 443  
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Author Tang, L.; Cheng, H.; Qu, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Estimating Provincial Economic Development Level of China Using DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Satellite Imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Advanced Materials Research Abbreviated Journal Amr  
  Volume 807-809 Issue Pages 1903-1908  
  Keywords (up) Curve Fitting; DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light; Economic Development; Provincial Scale; Regression Analysis; *Economics  
  Abstract How to estimate regional economic development level is important for solving regional inequality problems. Most of previous studies on regional economic development are based on the statistics collected typically in administrative units. This paper has analyzed the defects of traditional studies, and attempted to research regional economic development problems with 10-year DMSP/OLS nighttime light satellite imagery as a new data source. For exploring the relationship between DMSP/OLS nighttime light data and GDP, different types of curve fitting regression models have been tried, the Cubic model has shown the best performance with a coefficient of determination (R2) equal to 0.803. Based on this positive correlation, we have estimated provincial economic development level of China using DMSP/OLS nighttime light data. The research results have indicated that the DMSP/OLS nighttime light data can well reveal provincial economic development levels.  
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  ISSN 1662-8985 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 202  
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Author Gaston, K.J.; Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Hopkins, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution: a mechanistic appraisal Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society Abbreviated Journal Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc  
  Volume 88 Issue 4 Pages 912-927  
  Keywords (up) dark; information; light; moonlight; night; pollution; resources; rhythms; time  
  Abstract The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution have been a longstanding source of concern, accentuated by realized and projected growth in electrical lighting. As human communities and lighting technologies develop, artificial light increasingly modifies natural light regimes by encroaching on dark refuges in space, in time, and across wavelengths. A wide variety of ecological implications of artificial light have been identified. However, the primary research to date is largely focused on the disruptive influence of nighttime light on higher vertebrates, and while comprehensive reviews have been compiled along taxonomic lines and within specific research domains, the subject is in need of synthesis within a common mechanistic framework. Here we propose such a framework that focuses on the cross-factoring of the ways in which artificial lighting alters natural light regimes (spatially, temporally, and spectrally), and the ways in which light influences biological systems, particularly the distinction between light as a resource and light as an information source. We review the evidence for each of the combinations of this cross-factoring. As artificial lighting alters natural patterns of light in space, time and across wavelengths, natural patterns of resource use and information flows may be disrupted, with downstream effects to the structure and function of ecosystems. This review highlights: (i) the potential influence of nighttime lighting at all levels of biological organisation (from cell to ecosystem); (ii) the significant impact that even low levels of nighttime light pollution can have; and (iii) the existence of major research gaps, particularly in terms of the impacts of light at population and ecosystem levels, identification of intensity thresholds, and the spatial extent of impacts in the vicinity of artificial lights.  
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9EZ, U.K  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3231 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23565807 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 14  
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Author Baugh, K.; Elvidge, C.D.; Ghosh, T.; Ziskin, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Development of a 2009 Stable Lights Product using DMSP-OLS data Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Proceedings of the Asia-Pacific Advanced Network Abbreviated Journal APAN Proceedings  
  Volume 30 Issue Pages 114  
  Keywords (up) DMSP-OLS; remote sensing  
  Abstract Since 1994, NGDC has had an active program focused on global mapping of nighttime lights using the data collected by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) sensors. The basic product is a global annual cloud-free composite, which averages the OLS visible band data for one satellite from the cloud-free segments of individual orbits. Over the years, NGDC has developed automatic algorithms for screening the quality of the nighttime visible band observations to remove areas contaminated by sunlight, moonlight, and the presence of clouds. In the Stable Lights product generation, fires and other ephemeral lights are removed based on their high brightness and short duration. Background noise is removed by setting thresholds based on visible band values found in areas known to be free of detectable lights. In 2010, NGDC released the version 4 time series of Stable Lights, spanning the years 1992-2009. These are available online at <http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/dmsp/downloadV4composites.html>.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2227-3026 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 207  
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