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Author Ciocca, M.; Wang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title By the light of the silvery Moon: fact and fiction Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Physics Education Abbreviated Journal Phys. Educ.  
  Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 360-367  
  Keywords Vision; moonlight; Purkinje effect; Purkinje shift; mesopic  
  Abstract Is moonlight 'silver' or 'cold'? In this paper we discuss the interesting combination of factors that contribute to the common descriptions of moonlight. Sunlight is reflected from the lunar surface and red-shifted. When traversing the atmosphere, moonlight is further depleted of short wavelength content by Rayleigh scattering. We measured the spectra of the moonlight to show these effects and compared them with sunlight. All measurements, including spectral reflectance, suggest that moonlight is redder than sunlight. The silvery Moon is just an illusion due to the properties and behaviour of our own eyes, including the responses of rods and cones and the physiological perceptive phenomenon called Purkinje shift.  
  Address Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY, USA E-mail: marco.ciocca(at)eku.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9120 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2227  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gallaway, T.; Olsen, R.N.; Mitchell, D.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blinded by the Light: Economic Analysis of Severe Light Pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Economic Insight Abbreviated Journal J Econ Insight  
  Volume 39 Issue 1 Pages 45-63  
  Keywords Economics; light pollution  
  Abstract This paper examines severe light pollution such as commonly found in large urban areas. Light pollution is the unintended negative consequences of poorly designed and injudiciously used artificial lighting. Light pollution generates significant costs including wasted energy and damage to human health, wildlife, recreation, and the beauty of the night sky. Typically, light-pollution models emphasize population density and ignore economic factors. Economic analysis of the issue has been singularly limited. Previous economic research has focused on widespread, but very low levels of light pollution. This paper makes a unique contribution by analyzing economic factors of severe light pollution. The paper utilizes economic data from the World Bank and unique remote sensing data for 184 countries to quantify the economic causes of severe light pollution. Fractional logit models confirm the importance of population and economic factors alike.  
  Address Department of Economics, Missouri State University; TerrelGallaway(at)missouristate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Missouri Valley Economic Association Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0361-6576 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2338  
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Author Tuttle, B. T., Anderson, S. J., Sutton, P. C., Elvidge, C. D., & Baugh, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title It Used To Be Dark Here Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 3 Issue 11 Pages 287-297  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Nighttime satellite imagery from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) has a unique capability to observe nocturnal light emissions from sources including cities, wild fires, and gas flares. Data from the DMSP OLS is used in a wide range of studies including mapping urban areas, estimating informal economies, and estimations of population. Given the extensive and increasing list of applications a repeatable method for assessing geolocation accuracy would be beneficial. An array of portable lights was designed and taken to multiple field sites known to have no other light sources. The lights were operated during nighttime overpasses by the DMSP OLS and observed in the imagery. An assessment of the geolocation accuracy was performed by measuring the distance between the GPS measured location of the lights and the observed location in the imagery. A systematic shift was observed and the mean distance was measured at 2.9 km.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2520  
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Author Menegaux, F.; Truong, T.; Anger, A.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Lamkarkach, F.; Arveux, P.; Kerbrat, P.; Fevotte, J.; Guenel, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night work and breast cancer: a population-based case-control study in France (the CECILE study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume 132 Issue 4 Pages 924-931  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Aged; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm; Employment; Female; France/epidemiology; Humans; Middle Aged; Occupations; Pregnancy; Risk Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract Night work involving disruption of circadian rhythm was suggested as a possible cause of breast cancer. We examined the role of night work in a large population-based case-control study carried out in France between 2005 and 2008. Lifetime occupational history including work schedules of each night work period was elicited in 1,232 cases of breast cancer and 1,317 population controls. Thirteen percent of the cases and 11% of the controls had ever worked on night shifts (OR = 1.27 [95% confidence interval = 0.99-1.64]). Odds ratios were 1.35 [1.01-1.80] in women who worked on overnight shifts, 1.40 [1.01-1.92] in women who had worked at night for 4.5 or more years, and 1.43 [1.01-2.03] in those who worked less than three nights per week on average. The odds ratio was 1.95 [1.13-3.35] in women employed in night work for >4 years before their first full-term pregnancy, a period where mammary gland cells are incompletely differentiated and possibly more susceptible to circadian disruption effects. Our results support the hypothesis that night work plays a role in breast cancer, particularly in women who started working at night before first full-term pregnancy.  
  Address Inserm, CESP Center for research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, Villejuif, France; Univ Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:22689255 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 781  
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Author Wood, B.; Rea, M.S.; Plitnick, B.; Figueiro, M.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light level and duration of exposure determine the impact of self-luminous tablets on melatonin suppression Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Applied Ergonomics Abbreviated Journal Appl Ergon  
  Volume 44 Issue 2 Pages 237-240  
  Keywords Adolescent; *Computers, Handheld; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Melatonin/*biosynthesis; Photoperiod; Saliva/*metabolism; Sleep/radiation effects; Time Factors; Young Adult; melatonin  
  Abstract Exposure to light from self-luminous displays may be linked to increased risk for sleep disorders because these devices emit optical radiation at short wavelengths, close to the peak sensitivity of melatonin suppression. Thirteen participants experienced three experimental conditions in a within-subjects design to investigate the impact of self-luminous tablet displays on nocturnal melatonin suppression: 1) tablets-only set to the highest brightness, 2) tablets viewed through clear-lens goggles equipped with blue light-emitting diodes that provided 40 lux of 470-nm light at the cornea, and 3) tablets viewed through orange-tinted glasses (dark control; optical radiation <525 nm approximately 0). Melatonin suppressions after 1-h and 2-h exposures to tablets viewed with the blue light were significantly greater than zero. Suppression levels after 1-h exposure to the tablets-only were not statistically different than zero; however, this difference reached significance after 2 h. Based on these results, display manufacturers can determine how their products will affect melatonin levels and use model predictions to tune the spectral power distribution of self-luminous devices to increase or to decrease stimulation to the circadian system.  
  Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA. woodb5@rpi.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-6870 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:22850476 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 136  
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