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Author Gaston, K.J.; Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Hopkins, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution: a mechanistic appraisal Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society Abbreviated Journal Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc  
  Volume 88 Issue 4 Pages 912-927  
  Keywords dark; information; light; moonlight; night; pollution; resources; rhythms; time  
  Abstract The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution have been a longstanding source of concern, accentuated by realized and projected growth in electrical lighting. As human communities and lighting technologies develop, artificial light increasingly modifies natural light regimes by encroaching on dark refuges in space, in time, and across wavelengths. A wide variety of ecological implications of artificial light have been identified. However, the primary research to date is largely focused on the disruptive influence of nighttime light on higher vertebrates, and while comprehensive reviews have been compiled along taxonomic lines and within specific research domains, the subject is in need of synthesis within a common mechanistic framework. Here we propose such a framework that focuses on the cross-factoring of the ways in which artificial lighting alters natural light regimes (spatially, temporally, and spectrally), and the ways in which light influences biological systems, particularly the distinction between light as a resource and light as an information source. We review the evidence for each of the combinations of this cross-factoring. As artificial lighting alters natural patterns of light in space, time and across wavelengths, natural patterns of resource use and information flows may be disrupted, with downstream effects to the structure and function of ecosystems. This review highlights: (i) the potential influence of nighttime lighting at all levels of biological organisation (from cell to ecosystem); (ii) the significant impact that even low levels of nighttime light pollution can have; and (iii) the existence of major research gaps, particularly in terms of the impacts of light at population and ecosystem levels, identification of intensity thresholds, and the spatial extent of impacts in the vicinity of artificial lights.  
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9EZ, U.K  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3231 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23565807 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 14  
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Author Fonken, Laura K; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mice exposed to dim light at night exaggerate inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Brain, Behavior, and Immunity Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 34 Issue Pages 159-163  
  Keywords animals; rodents; metabolism; health  
  Abstract The mammalian circadian system regulates many physiological functions including inflammatory responses. Appropriately timed light information is essential for maintaining circadian organization. Over the past ∼120 years, urbanization and the widespread adoption of electric lights have dramatically altered lighting environments. Exposure to light at night (LAN) is pervasive in modern society and disrupts core circadian clock mechanisms. Because microglia are the resident macrophages in the brain and macrophages contain intrinsic circadian clocks, we hypothesized that chronic exposure to LAN would alter microglia cytokine expression and sickness behavior following LPS administration. Exposure to 4 weeks of dim LAN elevated inflammatory responses in mice. Mice exposed to dimly lit, as compared to dark, nights exaggerated changes in body temperature and elevated microglia pro-inflammatory cytokine expression following LPS administration. Furthermore, dLAN mice had a prolonged sickness response following the LPS challenge. Mice exposed to dark or dimly lit nights had comparable sickness behavior directly following the LPS injection; however, dLAN mice showed greater reductions in locomotor activity, increased anorectic behavior, and increased weight loss than mice maintained in dark nights 24 h post-LPS injection. Overall, these data suggest that chronic exposure to even very low levels of light pollution may alter inflammatory responses. These results may have important implications for humans and other urban dwelling species that commonly experience nighttime light exposure.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1588  
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Author Fritschi, L.; Erren, T.C.; Glass, D.C.; Girschik, J.; Thomson, A.K.; Saunders, C.; Boyle, T.; El-Zaemey, S.; Rogers, P.; Peters, S.; Slevin, T.; D'Orsogna, A.; de Vocht, F.; Vermeulen, R.; Heyworth, J.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The association between different night shiftwork factors and breast cancer: a case-control study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer  
  Volume 109 Issue 9 Pages 2472-2480  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Case-Control Studies; Female; Humans; Life Style; Middle Aged; Questionnaires; Risk; Risk Factors; Western Australia/epidemiology; *Work Schedule Tolerance; Young Adult; oncogenesis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Research on the possible association between shiftwork and breast cancer is complicated because there are many different shiftwork factors, which might be involved including: light at night, phase shift, sleep disruption and changes in lifestyle factors while on shiftwork (diet, physical activity, alcohol intake and low sun exposure). METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study in Western Australia from 2009 to 2011 with 1205 incident breast cancer cases and 1789 frequency age-matched controls. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect demographic, reproductive, and lifestyle factors and lifetime occupational history and a telephone interview was used to obtain further details about the shiftwork factors listed above. RESULTS: A small increase in risk was suggested for those ever doing the graveyard shift (work between midnight and 0500 hours) and breast cancer (odds ratio (OR)=1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.97-1.39). For phase shift, we found a 22% increase in breast cancer risk (OR=1.22, 95% CI=1.01-1.47) with a statistically significant dose-response relationship (P=0.04). For the other shiftwork factors, risks were marginally elevated and not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: We found some evidence that some of the factors involved in shiftwork may be associated with breast cancer but the ORs were low and there were inconsistencies in duration and dose-response relationships.  
  Address Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24022188; PMCID:PMC3817316 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 153  
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Author Shimose, T.; Yokawa, K.; Tachihara, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Higher Catch Rates Around the Full Moon for Blue Marlin, Makaira Nigricans, in a Diurnal Trolling Fishery Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Bulletin of Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Bms  
  Volume 89 Issue 3 Pages 759-765  
  Keywords fish; blue marlin; Makaira nigricans; Moon; moonlight; Feeding Behavior  
  Abstract The relationship between lunar phase and catch rates of blue marlin, Makaira nigricans Lacépède, 1802, in a diurnal trolling fishery at Yonaguni Island, southwestern Japan, was investigated. The mean catch per unit effort of blue marlin to lunar day was expressed by a periodic regression and significantly increased around the full moon. The stomach content index also significantly increased around the full moon in small blue marlin (<200 cm lower jaw–fork length), indicating that diurnal feeding activities of blue marlin increased around the full moon, especially for smaller individuals. The diurnal feeding activity is thought to be influenced by the nighttime activities of blue marlin and/or prey movements.  
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  ISSN 0007-4977 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 63  
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Author Shimmura, Tsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Takashi url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian clock determines the timing of rooster crowing Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Current Biology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages R231–R233  
  Keywords animals; rooster; bird  
  Abstract Crowing of roosters is described by onomatopoetic terms such as ‘cock-a-doodle-doo’ (English), ‘ki-ke-ri-ki’ (German), and ‘ko-ke-kok-koh’ (Japanese). Rooster crowing is a symbol of the break of dawn in many countries. Indeed, crowing is frequently observed in the morning [1] . However, people also notice that crowing is sometimes observed at other times of day. Therefore, it is yet unclear whether crowing is under the control of an internal biological clock, or is simply caused by external stimuli. Here we show that predawn crowing is under the control of a circadian clock. Although external stimuli such as light and crowing by other individuals also induce roosters’ crowing, the magnitude of this induction is also regulated by a circadian clock.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1600  
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Author Dacke, M.; Baird, E.; Byrne, M.; Scholtz, C.H.; Warrant, E.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dung beetles use the Milky Way for orientation Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 298-300  
  Keywords Animals; Beetles/*physiology; *Behavior, Animal; Cues; Feces; *Galaxies; Locomotion; Moon; Motor Activity; Orientation/*physiology; *Stars, Celestial; Vision, Ocular/physiology; Milky Way; insects  
  Abstract When the moon is absent from the night sky, stars remain as celestial visual cues. Nonetheless, only birds, seals, and humans are known to use stars for orientation. African ball-rolling dung beetles exploit the sun, the moon, and the celestial polarization pattern to move along straight paths, away from the intense competition at the dung pile. Even on clear moonless nights, many beetles still manage to orientate along straight paths. This led us to hypothesize that dung beetles exploit the starry sky for orientation, a feat that has, to our knowledge, never been demonstrated in an insect. Here, we show that dung beetles transport their dung balls along straight paths under a starlit sky but lose this ability under overcast conditions. In a planetarium, the beetles orientate equally well when rolling under a full starlit sky as when only the Milky Way is present. The use of this bidirectional celestial cue for orientation has been proposed for vertebrates, spiders, and insects, but never proven. This finding represents the first convincing demonstration for the use of the starry sky for orientation in insects and provides the first documented use of the Milky Way for orientation in the animal kingdom.  
  Address Department of Biology, Lund University, 223 62 Lund, Sweden. marie.dacke@biol.lu.se  
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  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23352694 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 116  
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Author Cajochen, C.; Altanay-Ekici, S.; Munch, M.; Frey, S.; Knoblauch, V.; Wirz-Justice, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence that the lunar cycle influences human sleep Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 15 Pages 1485-1488  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Cross-Sectional Studies; Electroencephalography; Female; Humans; Hydrocortisone/analysis/metabolism; Male; Melatonin/analysis/metabolism; Middle Aged; Moon; Nontherapeutic Human Experimentation; Periodicity; Saliva/metabolism; Sleep/*physiology; Sleep Stages/physiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract Endogenous rhythms of circalunar periodicity ( approximately 29.5 days) and their underlying molecular and genetic basis have been demonstrated in a number of marine species [1, 2]. In contrast, there is a great deal of folklore but no consistent association of moon cycles with human physiology and behavior [3]. Here we show that subjective and objective measures of sleep vary according to lunar phase and thus may reflect circalunar rhythmicity in humans. To exclude confounders such as increased light at night or the potential bias in perception regarding a lunar influence on sleep, we retrospectively analyzed sleep structure, electroencephalographic activity during non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep, and secretion of the hormones melatonin and cortisol found under stringently controlled laboratory conditions in a cross-sectional setting. At no point during and after the study were volunteers or investigators aware of the a posteriori analysis relative to lunar phase. We found that around full moon, electroencephalogram (EEG) delta activity during NREM sleep, an indicator of deep sleep, decreased by 30%, time to fall asleep increased by 5 min, and EEG-assessed total sleep duration was reduced by 20 min. These changes were associated with a decrease in subjective sleep quality and diminished endogenous melatonin levels. This is the first reliable evidence that a lunar rhythm can modulate sleep structure in humans when measured under the highly controlled conditions of a circadian laboratory study protocol without time cues.  
  Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, 4012 Basel, Switzerland. christian.cajochen@upkbs.ch  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23891110 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 140  
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Author Warrant, E.J.; Johnsen, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Vision and the light environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 22 Pages R990-4  
  Keywords photobiology; animals; physiology of vision; photodetection  
  Abstract Almost all animals, no matter how humble, possess eyes. Only those that live in total darkness, such as in a pitch-dark cave, may lack eyes entirely. Even at tremendous depths in the ocean — where the only lights that are ever seen are rare and fitful sparks of bioluminescence — most animals have eyes, and often surprisingly well-developed eyes. And despite their diversity (there are currently ten generally recognised optical types) all eyes have evolved in response to the remarkably varied light environments that are present in the habitats where animals live. Variations in the intensity of light, as well as in its direction, colour and dominant planes of polarisation, have all had dramatic effects on visual evolution. In the terrestrial habitats where we ourselves have most recently evolved, the light environment can vary quite markedly from day to night and from one location to another. In aquatic habitats, this variation can be orders of magnitude greater. Even though the ecologies and life histories of animals have played a major role in visual evolution, it is arguably the physical limitations imposed on photodetection by a given habitat and its light environment that have defined the basic selective pressures that have driven the evolution of eyes.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Lund, Solvegatan 35, S-22362 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: Eric.Warrant@biol.lu.se  
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  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:24262832 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 235  
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Author Kantermann, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian biology: sleep-styles shaped by light-styles Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 16 Pages R689-90  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Clocks/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; *Photoperiod; *Sunlight  
  Abstract Light and darkness are the main time cues synchronising all biological clocks to the external environment. This little understood evolutionary phenomenon is called circadian entrainment. A new study illuminates our understanding of how modern light- and lifestyles compromise circadian entrainment and impact our biological clocks.  
  Address Chronobiology – Centre for Behaviour and Neurosciences, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 7, 9747 AG Groningen, The Netherlands. thomas@kantermann.de  
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  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23968925 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 501  
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Author Wright, K.P.J.; McHill, A.W.; Birks, B.R.; Griffin, B.R.; Rusterholz, T.; Chinoy, E.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Entrainment of the human circadian clock to the natural light-dark cycle Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 16 Pages 1554-1558  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Circadian Clocks/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; *Photoperiod; *Sunlight; Young Adult; Circadian Rhythm  
  Abstract The electric light is one of the most important human inventions. Sleep and other daily rhythms in physiology and behavior, however, evolved in the natural light-dark cycle [1], and electrical lighting is thought to have disrupted these rhythms. Yet how much the age of electrical lighting has altered the human circadian clock is unknown. Here we show that electrical lighting and the constructed environment is associated with reduced exposure to sunlight during the day, increased light exposure after sunset, and a delayed timing of the circadian clock as compared to a summer natural 14 hr 40 min:9 hr 20 min light-dark cycle camping. Furthermore, we find that after exposure to only natural light, the internal circadian clock synchronizes to solar time such that the beginning of the internal biological night occurs at sunset and the end of the internal biological night occurs before wake time just after sunrise. In addition, we find that later chronotypes show larger circadian advances when exposed to only natural light, making the timing of their internal clocks in relation to the light-dark cycle more similar to earlier chronotypes. These findings have important implications for understanding how modern light exposure patterns contribute to late sleep schedules and may disrupt sleep and circadian clocks.  
  Address Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0354, USA. kenneth.wright@colorado.edu  
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  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23910656; PMCID:PMC4020279 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 505  
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