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Author Smith, S.D.P.; McIntyre, P.B.; Halpern, B.S.; Cooke, R.M.; Marino, A.L.; Boyer, G.L.; Buchsbaum, A.; Burton, J., G. Allen; Campbell, L.M.; Ciborowski, J.J.H.; Doran, P.J.; Infante, D.M.; Johnson, L.B.; Read, J.G.; Rose, J.B.; Rutherford, E.S.; Steinman, A.D.; Allan, J.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Rating impacts in a multi-stressor world: a quantitative assessment of 50 stressors affecting the Great Lakes Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Ecological Applications Abbreviated Journal Ecological Applications  
  Volume Issue Pages 140915094202006  
  Keywords Great Lakes; limnology; light pollution; environment; stressor; ecology  
  Abstract Ecosystems often experience multiple environmental stressors simultaneously that differ widely in their pathways and strengths of impact. Differences in relative impact can guide restoration and management prioritization, but few studies have empirically assessed a comprehensive suite of stressors acting on a given ecosystem. To fill this gap in the Laurentian Great Lakes, where considerable restoration investments are currently underway, we used expert elicitation via a detailed online survey to develop ratings of the relative impacts of 50 potential stressors. Highlighting the multiplicity of stressors in this system, experts assessed all 50 stressors to have some impact on ecosystem condition, but ratings differed greatly among stressors. Individual stressors related to invasive and nuisance species (e.g., dreissenid mussels and ballast invasion risk) and climate change were assessed as having the greatest potential impacts. These results mark a shift away from the longstanding emphasis on nonpoint phosphorus and persistent bioaccumulative toxic substances in the Great Lakes. Differences in impact ratings among lakes and ecosystem zones were weak, and experts exhibited surprisingly high levels of agreement on the relative impacts of most stressors. Our results provide a basin-wide, quantitative summary of expert opinion on the present-day influence of all major Great Lakes stressors. The resulting ratings can facilitate prioritizing stressors to achieve management objectives in a given location, as well as providing a baseline for future stressor impact assessments in the Great Lakes and elsewhere.  
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  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 372  
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Author Mace, B.L.; McDaniel, J. url  openurl
  Title Visitor Evaluation of Night Sky Interpretation in Bryce Canyon National Park and Cedar Breaks National Monument Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Interpretation Research Abbreviated Journal J. of Interp. Res.  
  Volume 18 Issue 2 Pages 39-57  
  Keywords parks; interpretation; social studies; Bryce Canyon National Park; Cedar Breaks National Monument; dark skies  
  Abstract Natural lightscapes are an important resource for parks and protected areas, including Bryce Canyon National Park and Cedar Breaks National Monument. Both locations offer night sky interpretive programs, attracting over 27,000 visitors annually, equaling all other interpretive programs combined. Parks need to understand what drives visitor interest and park managers need to assess if night sky interpretation is meeting expectations. A total of 1,179 night and day visitors to Bryce Canyon National Park and Cedar Breaks National Monument served as participants and completed a 36-item survey measuring knowledge, attitudes, benefits, and behaviors related to the night sky. Results show those who attended a night sky interpretive program gained a significant amount of knowledge about night sky issues. Both day and night visitors have strongly held attitudes about light pollution and the protection of the night sky in national parks.  
  Address Department of Psychology, Southern Utah University, Cedar City, UT 84720 USA  
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  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 374  
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Author Bolshakov, C.V.; Bulyuk, V.N.; Sinelschikova, A.Y.; Vorotkov, M.V. url  openurl
  Title Influence of the vertical light beam on numbers and flight trajectories of night-migrating songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Avian Ecol. Behav. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 24 Issue Pages 35–49  
  Keywords Animals; nocturnal migration; light pollution; numbers; flight track; extrinsic factors  
  Abstract In this paper we analyse the data obtained in the automatic regime by the Optical Electronic Device (OED, Vorotkov et al. 2009; Bolshakov et al. 2010) for autumn nocturnal passage of passerines on the Courish Spit on the Baltic Sea and estimate: (1) numbers aloft under differ- ent types of wind (following wind, opposing wind and calm conditions); (2) flight trajectories in the 5° cone of white light. We found that under natural nocturnal illumination conditions, the vertical cone of white light impacts the detectable numbers aloft and disturbs straight flight trajectories. The OED data obtained throughout the night suggest, after correction for ground speed and the mean flight altitude, the actual number of birds in the light cone peaks at calm conditions, is halved under following winds which are optimal for passage and is 21 times lower under unfavourable headwinds. It is assumed that high numbers in the light cone under calm conditions is an artefact of bird attraction by light and their concentration around the searchlights. The OED data obtained for midnight ±1 hour, flying migrants respond to the vertical light cone under all types of wind conditions by altering their straight flight trajec- tories. However, this response is most apparent in still air conditions. The proportion of birds that change their flight track reaches 43%. We assume that under such conditions some birds are not only attracted to the illuminated zone at low altitudes, but, besides slowing down their ground speed, change their trajectories to the degree of flying in circles. To determine combi- nations of factors and to test for their possible impact on the probability of response to light, we used a binary logistic regression. The presence of birds with straight vs. curved tracks was used as the dependent variable. Final logistic models obtained for midnight ±1 hour for calm conditions and headwinds, suggest that occurrence probability of songbirds with curvilinear flight tracks is higher for small birds, when no or just a small part of Moon disk is visible and under high air humidity. Under headwinds the probability of occurrence of birds flying curvi- linear tracks is also higher under overcast. For following winds, the probability of occurrence birds flying curvilinearly was higher when many small birds were aloft, when air humidity was high and when wind was not strictly following. Unlike other wind situations, this model did not include the size of visible part of the Moon disk as a significant factor. The increase of occurrence of curvilinear flight tracks through the light beam when winds were not exactly following was probably caused by the problems with compensating the lateral component of tailwinds under high velocities, especially by small birds.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 378  
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Author Le Tallec, T.; Perret, M.; Théry, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light Pollution Modifies the Expression of Daily Rhythms and Behavior Patterns in a Nocturnal Primate Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PLoS ONE Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue 11 Pages e79250  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Among anthropogenic pressures, light pollution altering light/dark cycles and changing the nocturnal component of the environment constitutes a threat for biodiversity. Light pollution is widely spread across the world and continuously growing. However, despite the efforts realized to describe and understand the effects of artificial lighting on fauna, few studies have documented its consequences on biological rhythms, behavioral and physiological functions in nocturnal mammals. To determine the impacts of light pollution on nocturnal mammals an experimental study was conducted on a nocturnal primate, the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. Male mouse lemurs (N = 8) were exposed 14 nights to moonlight treatment and then exposed 14 nights to light pollution treatment. For both treatments, chronobiological parameters related to locomotor activity and core temperature were recorded using telemetric transmitters. In addition, at the end of each treatment, the 14th night, nocturnal and feeding behaviors were explored using an infrared camera. Finally, throughout the study, body mass and daily caloric food intake were recorded. For the first time in a nocturnal primate, light pollution was demonstrated to modify daily rhythms of locomotor activity and core temperature especially through phase delays and increases in core temperature. Moreover, nocturnal activity and feeding behaviors patterns were modified negatively. This study suggests that light pollution induces daily desynchronization of biological rhythms and could lead to seasonal desynchronization with potential deleterious consequences for animals in terms of adaptation and anticipation of environmental changes.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 380  
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Author Nowinszky, L. url  openurl
  Title Light-trap Catch of Harmful Microlepidoptera Species in Connection with Polarized Moonlight and Collecting Distance Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Advanced Laboratory Research in Biology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 4 Issue 4 Pages 108-117  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The paper deals with light-trap catch of 25 Microlepidoptera species depending on the polarized moonlight and

collecting distance. The catching data were chosen from the 27 stations of the Hungarian National Light-trap Network and

from the years between 1959 and 1961. Relative catch values were calculated from the catching data per stations and

swarming. They are ranged and averaged in the phase angle divisions. The catching peak of ten species is in First Quarter,

another ten species have the peak in the First Quarter and Last one, and only in two cases the peak is in Last Quarter. Then

there is the maximum ratio of polarized moonlight. Catching peak of only three species is in connection with the collecting

distance when is the greatest of collection distance.

Keywords: Microlepidoptera, light-trap moon phases, polarized moonlight, catching distance.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 381  
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