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Author Lorenz, D. url  openurl
  Title (up) Light Pollution Atlas 2006 Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 958  
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Author Solano Lamphar, H.A.; Kocifaj, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Light pollution in ultraviolet and visible spectrum: effect on different visual perceptions Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages e56563  
  Keywords Lighting; Animals; *Environmental Pollution; Humans; Insects; Light; Lighting/*adverse effects; Models, Theoretical; *Visual Perception  
  Abstract In general terms, lighting research has been focused in the development of artificial light with the purpose of saving energy and having more durable lamps. However, the consequences that artificial night lighting could bring to the human being and living organisms have become an important issue recently. Light pollution represents a significant problem to both the environment and human health causing a disruption of biological rhythms related not only to the visible spectrum, but also to other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Since the lamps emit across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, all photobiological species may be exposed to another type of light pollution. By comparing five different lamps, the present study attempts to evaluate UV radiative fluxes relative to what humans and two species of insects perceive as sky glow level. We have analyzed three atmospheric situations: clear sky, overcast sky and evolving precipitable water content. One important finding suggests that when a constant illuminance of urban spaces has to be guaranteed the sky glow from the low pressure sodium lamps has the most significant effect to the visual perception of the insects tested. But having the fixed number of luminaires the situation changes and the low pressure sodium lamp would be the best choice for all three species. The sky glow effects can be interpreted correctly only if the lamp types and the required amount of scotopic luxes at the ground are taken into account simultaneously. If these two factors are combined properly, then the ecological consequences of sky glow can be partly reduced. The results of this research may be equally useful for lighting engineers, architects, biologists and researchers who are studying the effects of sky glow on humans and biodiversity.  
  Address ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovak Republic. lamphar@gmail.com  
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  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23441205; PMCID:PMC3575508 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 578  
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Author Bukalev, A.V.; Vinogradova, I.A.; Zabezhinskii, M.A.; Semenchenko, A.V.; Anisimov, V.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Light pollution increases morbidity and mortality rate from different causes in female rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Advances in Gerontology Abbreviated Journal Adv Gerontol  
  Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 180-188  
  Keywords light-at-night; spontaneous tumors; nontumor pathology epiphysis; rats; animals; mammals  
  Abstract The influence of different light regimes (constant light, LL; constant darkness, DD; standard light regime, LD, 12 hours light/12 hours darkness; and natural lighting of the northwest of Russia (NL) on non-tumor pathology revealed in the post-mortem examination of female rats has been studied. It was found that keeping 25-days-old animals under LL and NL conditions led to an increase in the number of infectious diseases and the substantially faster development of spontaneous tumors (2.9 and 3.3 diseases per one rat, respectively), variety of nontumor pathology found in dead rats, compared with the animals in standard (standard light) regime (1.72 diseases per one rat). Light deprivation (DD) led to a substantial reduction in the development of new growth, as well as nontumor and infectious diseases (1.06 diseases per one rat), compared to the same parameters in a standard light regime.  
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  ISSN 2079-0570 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 89  
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Author Le Tallec, T.; Perret, M.; Théry, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Light Pollution Modifies the Expression of Daily Rhythms and Behavior Patterns in a Nocturnal Primate Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PLoS ONE Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue 11 Pages e79250  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Among anthropogenic pressures, light pollution altering light/dark cycles and changing the nocturnal component of the environment constitutes a threat for biodiversity. Light pollution is widely spread across the world and continuously growing. However, despite the efforts realized to describe and understand the effects of artificial lighting on fauna, few studies have documented its consequences on biological rhythms, behavioral and physiological functions in nocturnal mammals. To determine the impacts of light pollution on nocturnal mammals an experimental study was conducted on a nocturnal primate, the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. Male mouse lemurs (N = 8) were exposed 14 nights to moonlight treatment and then exposed 14 nights to light pollution treatment. For both treatments, chronobiological parameters related to locomotor activity and core temperature were recorded using telemetric transmitters. In addition, at the end of each treatment, the 14th night, nocturnal and feeding behaviors were explored using an infrared camera. Finally, throughout the study, body mass and daily caloric food intake were recorded. For the first time in a nocturnal primate, light pollution was demonstrated to modify daily rhythms of locomotor activity and core temperature especially through phase delays and increases in core temperature. Moreover, nocturnal activity and feeding behaviors patterns were modified negatively. This study suggests that light pollution induces daily desynchronization of biological rhythms and could lead to seasonal desynchronization with potential deleterious consequences for animals in terms of adaptation and anticipation of environmental changes.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 380  
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Author Clark, G.F.; Stark, J.S.; Johnston, E.L.; Runcie, J.W.; Goldsworthy, P.M.; Raymond, B.; Riddle, M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Light-driven tipping points in polar ecosystems Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol  
  Volume 19 Issue 12 Pages 3749-3761  
  Keywords Ecology; benthic; biodiversity; irradiance; macroalgae; marine ecology; polar; regime shift  
  Abstract Some ecosystems can undergo abrupt transformation in response to relatively small environmental change. Identifying imminent 'tipping points' is crucial for biodiversity conservation, particularly in the face of climate change. Here, we describe a tipping point mechanism likely to induce widespread regime shifts in polar ecosystems. Seasonal snow and ice-cover periodically block sunlight reaching polar ecosystems, but the effect of this on annual light depends critically on the timing of cover within the annual solar cycle. At high latitudes, sunlight is strongly seasonal, and ice-free days around the summer solstice receive orders of magnitude more light than those in winter. Early melt that brings the date of ice-loss closer to midsummer will cause an exponential increase in the amount of sunlight reaching some ecosystems per year. This is likely to drive ecological tipping points in which primary producers (plants and algae) flourish and out-compete dark-adapted communities. We demonstrate this principle on Antarctic shallow seabed ecosystems, which our data suggest are sensitive to small changes in the timing of sea-ice loss. Algae respond to light thresholds that are easily exceeded by a slight reduction in sea-ice duration. Earlier sea-ice loss is likely to cause extensive regime shifts in which endemic shallow-water invertebrate communities are replaced by algae, reducing coastal biodiversity and fundamentally changing ecosystem functioning. Modeling shows that recent changes in ice and snow cover have already transformed annual light budgets in large areas of the Arctic and Antarctic, and both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are likely to experience further significant change in light. The interaction between ice-loss and solar irradiance renders polar ecosystems acutely vulnerable to abrupt ecosystem change, as light-driven tipping points are readily breached by relatively slight shifts in the timing of snow and ice-loss.  
  Address School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23893603 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 850  
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Author Kostic, A.; Kremic, M.; Djokic, L.; Kostic, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Light-emitting diodes in street and roadway lighting – a case study involving mesopic effects Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology  
  Volume 45 Issue 2 Pages 217-229  
  Keywords LED; LED lighting; mesopic; street lighting; outdoor lighting; roadway lighting  
  Abstract The paper considers the justification for the application of light-emitting diode (LED) technology to urban lighting. The results suggest that LEDs are convenient for architectural lighting and deserve to be considered for use in ambient lighting. The recently developed Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE) mesopic system enabled the inclusion of mesopic effects into a comprehensive techno-economic analysis, which dealt with efficiency, maintenance and financial aspects of the use of LEDs in street and roadway lighting. It is concluded that the average energy savings when using LED instead of high-pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires amount to 19–26% for single-sided, staggered and opposite layouts, although they are frequently negligible if mesopic effects are not included. The total costs of the LED lighting solutions, even including mesopic effects, are 1.36 to 6.44 times higher than those of the comparable HPS lighting solutions. Therefore, LEDs are questionable for street and roadway lighting.  
  Address Faculty of Architecture, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia  
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  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 339  
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Author Femia, N.; Fortunato, M.; Vitelli, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Light-to-Light: PV-Fed LED Lighting Systems Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics Abbreviated Journal IEEE Trans. Power Electron.  
  Volume 28 Issue 8 Pages 4063-4073  
  Keywords light-to-light systems; outdoor lighting; lighting technology; LED; LED lighting; photovoltaics; PV  
  Abstract This paper discusses the principle of operation, dynamic modeling, and control design for light-to-light (LtL) systems, whose aim is to directly convert the sun irradiation into artificial light. The system discussed in this paper is composed by a photovoltaic (PV) panel, an LED array, a dc-dc converter dedicated to the maximum power point tracking of the PV panel and a dc-dc converter dedicated to drive the LEDs array. A system controller is also included, whose goal is to ensure the matching between the maximum available PV power and the LED power by means of a low-frequency LEDs dimming. An experimental design example is discussed to illustrate the functionalities of the LtL system.  
  Address Dipt. di Ing. Elettron. e Ing. Inf., Univ. of Salerno, Salerno, Italy  
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  ISSN 0885-8993 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 331  
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Author Nowinszky, L. url  openurl
  Title (up) Light-trap Catch of Harmful Microlepidoptera Species in Connection with Polarized Moonlight and Collecting Distance Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Advanced Laboratory Research in Biology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 4 Issue 4 Pages 108-117  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The paper deals with light-trap catch of 25 Microlepidoptera species depending on the polarized moonlight and

collecting distance. The catching data were chosen from the 27 stations of the Hungarian National Light-trap Network and

from the years between 1959 and 1961. Relative catch values were calculated from the catching data per stations and

swarming. They are ranged and averaged in the phase angle divisions. The catching peak of ten species is in First Quarter,

another ten species have the peak in the First Quarter and Last one, and only in two cases the peak is in Last Quarter. Then

there is the maximum ratio of polarized moonlight. Catching peak of only three species is in connection with the collecting

distance when is the greatest of collection distance.

Keywords: Microlepidoptera, light-trap moon phases, polarized moonlight, catching distance.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 381  
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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Quetting, M.; Partecke, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Long-term effects of chronic light pollution on seasonal functions of European blackbirds (Turdus merula) Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 12 Pages e85069  
  Keywords Turdus merula; European blackbird; birds; animals; Reproduction  
  Abstract Light pollution is known to affect important biological functions of wild animals, including daily and annual cycles. However, knowledge about long-term effects of chronic exposure to artificial light at night is still very limited. Here we present data on reproductive physiology, molt and locomotor activity during two-year cycles of European blackbirds (Turdus merula) exposed to either dark nights or 0.3 lux at night. As expected, control birds kept under dark nights exhibited two regular testicular and testosterone cycles during the two-year experiment. Control urban birds developed testes faster than their control rural conspecifics. Conversely, while in the first year blackbirds exposed to light at night showed a normal but earlier gonadal cycle compared to control birds, during the second year the reproductive system did not develop at all: both testicular size and testosterone concentration were at baseline levels in all birds. In addition, molt sequence in light-treated birds was more irregular than in control birds in both years. Analysis of locomotor activity showed that birds were still synchronized to the underlying light-dark cycle. We suggest that the lack of reproductive activity and irregular molt progression were possibly the results of i) birds being stuck in a photorefractory state and/or ii) chronic stress. Our data show that chronic low intensities of light at night can dramatically affect the reproductive system. Future studies are needed in order to investigate if and how urban animals avoid such negative impact and to elucidate the physiological mechanisms behind these profound long-term effects of artificial light at night. Finally we call for collaboration between scientists and policy makers to limit the impact of light pollution on animals and ecosystems.  
  Address Department of Migration and Immuno-ecology, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Radolfzell, Germany ; Department of Biology, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24376865; PMCID:PMC3869906 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 49  
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Author Saldaña-Vázquez, R.A.; Munguía-Rosas, M.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Lunar phobia in bats and its ecological correlates: A meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Mammalian Biology – Zeitschrift für Säugetierkunde Abbreviated Journal Mammalian Biology – Zeitschrift für Säugetierkunde  
  Volume 78 Issue 3 Pages 216-219  
  Keywords Chiroptera; Foraging activity; Foraging habitat; Latitude; Moonlight; mammals; bats; animals  
  Abstract Animals show several behavioral strategies to reduce predation risks. Presumably, moonlight avoidance is a strategy used by some nocturnal species to reduce the risk of predation. In bats, some research indicates that foraging activity is negatively correlated with moonlight intensity, a phenomenon better known as lunar phobia. However, the currently available evidence is contradictory because some bat species reduce their activity during nights with more moonlight while the opposite occurs in other species. We quantitatively evaluated the strength and direction of the relationship between moonlight intensity and bat activity using a meta-analysis. We also looked at some ecological correlates of lunar phobia in bats. Specifically, we examined foraging habitat and latitude as potential moderators of the size of the lunar phobia effect. Our results show that, regardless of the method used to evaluate bat activity, the overall relationship between moonlight intensity and bat activity is significant and negative (r = −0.22). Species foraging on the surface of the water (piscivores and insectivores; r = −0.83) and forest canopy species (i.e., big frugivores; r = −0.30) are more affected by moonlight than those with different foraging habitats (understory, subcanopy, open air). Latitude was positively correlated with lunar phobia (r = 0.023). The stronger lunar phobia for bats foraging on the water surface and in the forest canopy may suggest that the risk of predation is greater where moonlight penetrates more easily. The significant effect of latitude as a moderator of lunar phobia suggests that there is a weak geographic pattern, with this phobia slightly more common in tropical bats than in temperate species.  
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  ISSN 1616-5047 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 97  
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