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Author Li, X.; Chen, X.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, J.; Chen, F.; Li, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Automatic intercalibration of night-time light imagery using robust regression Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Remote Sensing Letters Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing Letters  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 45-54  
  Keywords remote sensing; light at night  
  Abstract In remote-sensing community, radiometric calibration of night-time light images has long been a problem, hindering change detection of images in different dates. Currently, an intercalibration model is regarded as the unique solution for the problem, but prior knowledge is needed to extract reference pixels with stable lights, which are hard to obtain in most of the applications. This study proposed an automatic algorithm to extract the reference pixels for convenient use of the intercalibration model, with an assumption that there are sufficient pixels with stable night-time lights in the multi-temporal images. To automatically extract the stable pixels from images in two dates, all pixels in the two dates were entered into a linear regression model, and the outliers viewed as suspected changed pixels were discarded iteratively. Consequently, some stable pixels were extracted and the intercalibration model was implemented. Annual night-time light composites in Beijing, China, from 1992 to 2010 were taken as the study material, and the results show that the multi-temporal calibrated night-time light data have higher correlation with gross domestic production (GDP) (R 2 = 0.8734) and urban population (UP) (R 2 = 0.9269) than those of the uncalibrated images (with the R 2 values 0.7963 and 0.8575, respectively). Furthermore, the data inconsistency from different night-time light satellites in the same year was reduced with the proposed algorithm. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is effective in intercalibrating the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) images automatically.  
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  ISSN 2150-704X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 211  
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Author Longcore, T.; Rich, C.; Mineau, P.; MacDonald, B.; Bert, D.G.; Sullivan, L.M.; Mutrie, E.; Gauthreaux Jr., S.A.; Avery, M.L.; Crawford, R.L.; Manville II, A.M.; Travis, E.R.; Drake, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Avian mortality at communication towers in the United States and Canada: which species, how many, and where? Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 158 Issue Pages 410-419  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Birds migrating to and from breeding grounds in the United States and Canada are killed by the millions in collisions with lighted towers and their guy wires. Avian mortality at towers is highly variable across species, and the importance to each population depends on its size and trajectory. Building on our previous estimate of avian mortality at communication towers, we calculated mortality by species and by regions. To do this, we constructed a database of mortality by species at towers from available records and calculated the mean proportion of each species killed at towers within aggregated Bird Conservation Regions. These proportions were combined with mortality estimates that we previously calculated for those regions. We then compared our estimated bird mortality rates to the estimated populations of these species in the United States and Canada. Neotropical migrants suffer the greatest mortality; 97.4% of birds killed are passerines, mostly warblers (Parulidae, 58.4%), vireos (Vireonidae, 13.4%), thrushes (Turdidae, 7.7%), and sparrows (Emberizidae, 5.8%). Thirteen birds of conservation concern in the United States or Canada suffer annual mortality of 1–9% of their estimated total population. Of these, estimated annual mortality is >2% for Yellow Rail (Coturnicops noveboracensis), Swainson’s Warbler (Limnothlypis swainsonii), Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps), Bay-breasted Warbler (Setophaga castanea), Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera), Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum), Prairie Warbler (Setophaga discolor), and Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla). Avian mortality from anthropogenic sources is almost always reported in the aggregate (“number of birds killed”), which cannot detect the species-level effects necessary to make conservation assessments. Our approach to per species estimates could be undertaken for other sources of chronic anthropogenic mortality.  
  Address Communication towers; Mortality; Night lighting; Neotropical migrants; Collisions; Impact assessment; birds  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 54  
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Author Nguyen, B.P.; Postma, E.; Ekkers, D.; Degener, F.; Mejier, T. url  openurl
  Title (up) Bad Kissingen : a blueprint for future urban design Type Report
  Year 2013 Publication University Groningen Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords chronobiology, economy, society, urban design  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1061  
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Author Vignoli, L.; Luiselli, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Better in the dark: two Mediterranean amphibians synchronize reproduction with moonlit nights Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Web Ecology Abbreviated Journal Web Ecol.  
  Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 1-11  
  Keywords animals; amphibians; Hyla intermedia; Rana dalmatina; *Reproduction; reproductive strategies; Moon; moon phase; moonlight  
  Abstract In Amphibians, both positive and negative correlations between activity and full moon phase have been observed. In this study, we present data for two anuran species (Hyla intermedia and Rana dalmatina) studied in a hilly Mediterranean area of central Italy. We analysed, in a two-year survey, the relationships between the number of egg clutches laid each night and the moon phases by means of circular statistics. Moreover, the studied species exhibited clear oviposition site selection behaviour influenced, at least in H. intermedia, by moon phases. We observed the occurrence of an avoidance effect by amphibians for oviposition and specific egg-laying behaviour during moon phases around the full moon. This apparent lunar phobia was evident in both species when yearly data were pooled. On the other hand, while this pattern continued to be also evident in H. intermedia when single years were considered, in R. dalmatina it stood just in one year of study. Nonetheless, during cloudy nights, when moonlight arriving on the ground was low, the frogs' behaviour was similar to that observed in new moon phases. We interpreted the observed pattern as an anti-predatory strategy. Overall, comparisons between our own study and previous research suggest that there was insufficient evidence to establish any unequivocal patterns and that further research in this regard is needed.  
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  ISSN 1399-1183 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 80  
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Author Taylor, P.; Nimkingrat, P.; Strauch, O.; Ehlers, R.; Kiel, C. openurl 
  Title (up) Biocontrol Science and Technology Hybridisation and genetic selection for improving desiccation tolerance of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema feltiae Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 37–41  
  Keywords Animals  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 622  
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