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Author Kim, J.; Hwang, K.; Cho, J.; Koo, D.; Joo, E.; Hong, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Effect of bedside light on sleep quality and background eeg rhythms Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine  
  Volume 14 Issue Pages e170  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Artificial lighting has benefited society by extending the length of a productive day, but it can be ”light pollution” when it becomes excessive. Unnecessary exposure to artificial light at night can cause myopia, obesity, metabolic disorders and even some type of cancers.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 502  
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Author Sweater-Hickcox, K.; Narendran, N.; Bullough, J.; Freyssinier, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Effect of different coloured luminous surrounds on LED discomfort glare perception Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology  
  Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 464-475  
  Keywords perception; subjective; LED; LED lighting; spectral power distribution; SPD  
  Abstract Recently, there has been increased interest in energy-efficient lighting as energy resources become higher in demand. Anecdotal evidence suggests that certain populations believe light-emitting diodes (LED) produce more glare than traditional technologies. This may be due to a number of factors such as spectral power distribution (SPD), source luminance, or beam intensity distribution. A study was conducted to assess the effect of different SPDs on the perception of discomfort glare from an LED source. For the range of conditions evaluated, the presence of any luminous surround significantly reduced the perception of discomfort glare from the LED array. The blue luminous surround reduced discomfort glare perception significantly less than the white or the yellow luminous surrounds. The implications for solid-state lighting systems are discussed.  
  Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 338  
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Author Dukic, T.; Ahlstrom, C.; Patten, C.; Kettwich, C.; Kircher, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Effects of electronic billboards on driver distraction Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Traffic Injury Prevention Abbreviated Journal Traffic Inj Prev  
  Volume 14 Issue 5 Pages 469-476  
  Keywords Adult; Advertising as Topic/*methods; *Attention; Automobile Driving/*psychology; Eye Movements; Humans; Middle Aged; Psychomotor Performance; Sweden; Time Factors  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There is an increase in electronic advertising billboards along major roads, which may cause driver distraction due to the highly conspicuous design of the electronic billboards. Yet limited research on the impact of electronic billboards on driving performance and driver behavior is available. The Swedish Transport Administration recently approved the installation of 12 electronic billboards for a trial period along a 3-lane motorway with heavy traffic running through central Stockholm, Sweden. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of these electronic billboards on visual behavior and driving performance. METHOD: A total of 41 drivers were recruited to drive an instrumented vehicle passing 4 of the electronic billboards during day and night conditions. A driver was considered visually distracted when looking at a billboard continuously for more than 2 s or if the driver looked away from the road for a high percentage of time. Dependent variables were eye-tracking measures and driving performance measures. RESULTS: The visual behavior data showed that drivers had a significantly longer dwell time, a greater number of fixations, and longer maximum fixation duration when driving past an electronic billboard compared to other signs on the same road stretches. No differences were found for the factors day/night, and no effect was found for the driving behavior data. CONCLUSION: Electronic billboards have an effect on gaze behavior by attracting more and longer glances than regular traffic signs. Whether the electronic billboards attract too much attention and constitute a traffic safety hazard cannot be answered conclusively based on the present data.  
  Address Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linkoping, Sweden. tania.dukic@vti.se  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1538-9588 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23682577 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 247  
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Author Chamorro, E.; Bonnin-Arias, C.; Perez-Carrasco, M.J.; Munoz de Luna, J.; Vazquez, D.; Sanchez-Ramos, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Effects of light-emitting diode radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Photochemistry and Photobiology Abbreviated Journal Photochem Photobiol  
  Volume 89 Issue 2 Pages 468-473  
  Keywords Human Health; Apoptosis/*radiation effects; Biological Markers/metabolism; Caspases/metabolism; Cell Survival/radiation effects; DNA Damage; Epithelial Cells/cytology/metabolism/*radiation effects; Histones/metabolism; Humans; Light; Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial/*radiation effects; Mitochondria/*radiation effects; Photoperiod; Primary Cell Culture; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism; Retinal Pigment Epithelium/cytology/metabolism/*radiation effects  
  Abstract Human visual system is exposed to high levels of natural and artificial lights of different spectra and intensities along lifetime. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are the basic lighting components in screens of PCs, phones and TV sets; hence it is so important to know the implications of LED radiations on the human visual system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LEDs radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPEpiC). They were exposed to three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles, using blue-468 nm, green-525 nm, red-616 nm and white light. Cellular viability of HRPEpiC was evaluated by labeling all nuclei with DAPI; Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined by H2DCFDA staining; mitochondrial membrane potential was quantified by TMRM staining; DNA damage was determined by H2AX histone activation, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspases-3,-7 activation. It is shown that LED radiations decrease 75-99% cellular viability, and increase 66-89% cellular apoptosis. They also increase ROS production and DNA damage. Fluorescence intensity of apoptosis was 3.7% in nonirradiated cells and 88.8%, 86.1%, 83.9% and 65.5% in cells exposed to white, blue, green or red light, respectively. This study indicates three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles of exposure to LED lighting affect in vitro HRPEpiC.  
  Address Neuro-Computing and Neuro-Robotics Research Group, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. eva.chamorro@opt.ucm.es  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-8655 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22989198 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 511  
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Author Wright, K.P.J.; McHill, A.W.; Birks, B.R.; Griffin, B.R.; Rusterholz, T.; Chinoy, E.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Entrainment of the human circadian clock to the natural light-dark cycle Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 16 Pages 1554-1558  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Circadian Clocks/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; *Photoperiod; *Sunlight; Young Adult; Circadian Rhythm  
  Abstract The electric light is one of the most important human inventions. Sleep and other daily rhythms in physiology and behavior, however, evolved in the natural light-dark cycle [1], and electrical lighting is thought to have disrupted these rhythms. Yet how much the age of electrical lighting has altered the human circadian clock is unknown. Here we show that electrical lighting and the constructed environment is associated with reduced exposure to sunlight during the day, increased light exposure after sunset, and a delayed timing of the circadian clock as compared to a summer natural 14 hr 40 min:9 hr 20 min light-dark cycle camping. Furthermore, we find that after exposure to only natural light, the internal circadian clock synchronizes to solar time such that the beginning of the internal biological night occurs at sunset and the end of the internal biological night occurs before wake time just after sunrise. In addition, we find that later chronotypes show larger circadian advances when exposed to only natural light, making the timing of their internal clocks in relation to the light-dark cycle more similar to earlier chronotypes. These findings have important implications for understanding how modern light exposure patterns contribute to late sleep schedules and may disrupt sleep and circadian clocks.  
  Address Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0354, USA. kenneth.wright@colorado.edu  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23910656; PMCID:PMC4020279 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 505  
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