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Author Marquenie, J.M.; Donners, M.; Poot, H.; Steckel W.; de Witt, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Bird-Friendly Light Sources: Adapting the Spectral Composition of Artificial Lighting Type Magazine Article
  Year 2013 Publication IEEE Industry Application Magazine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 56-62  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1088  
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Author Edensor, T.; Millington, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Blackpool Illuminations: revaluing local cultural production, situated creativity and working-class values Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Cultural Policy Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Cultural Policy  
  Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 145-161  
  Keywords Society  
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  ISSN 1028-6632 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1033  
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Author Gallaway, T.; Olsen, R.N.; Mitchell, D.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Blinded by the Light: Economic Analysis of Severe Light Pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Economic Insight Abbreviated Journal J Econ Insight  
  Volume 39 Issue 1 Pages 45-63  
  Keywords Economics; light pollution  
  Abstract This paper examines severe light pollution such as commonly found in large urban areas. Light pollution is the unintended negative consequences of poorly designed and injudiciously used artificial lighting. Light pollution generates significant costs including wasted energy and damage to human health, wildlife, recreation, and the beauty of the night sky. Typically, light-pollution models emphasize population density and ignore economic factors. Economic analysis of the issue has been singularly limited. Previous economic research has focused on widespread, but very low levels of light pollution. This paper makes a unique contribution by analyzing economic factors of severe light pollution. The paper utilizes economic data from the World Bank and unique remote sensing data for 184 countries to quantify the economic causes of severe light pollution. Fractional logit models confirm the importance of population and economic factors alike.  
  Address Department of Economics, Missouri State University; TerrelGallaway(at)missouristate.edu  
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  Publisher Missouri Valley Economic Association Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  ISSN 0361-6576 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2338  
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Author Knutsson, A.; Alfredsson, L.; Karlsson, B.; Akerstedt, T.; Fransson, E.I.; Westerholm, P.; Westerlund, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Breast cancer among shift workers: results of the WOLF longitudinal cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Work Environ Health  
  Volume 39 Issue 2 Pages 170-177  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Circadian Rhythm; Female; Humans; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Middle Aged; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Assessment; Sweden/epidemiology; *Work Schedule Tolerance; oncogenesis  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether shift work (with or without night work) is associated with increased risk of breast cancer. METHODS: The population consisted of 4036 women. Data were obtained from WOLF (Work, Lipids, and Fibrinogen), a longitudinal cohort study. Information about baseline characteristics was based on questionnaire responses and medical examination. Cancer incidence from baseline to follow-up was obtained from the national cancer registry. Two exposure groups were identified: shift work with and without night work. The group with day work only was used as the reference group in the analysis. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate relative risk. RESULTS: In total, 94 women developed breast cancer during follow-up. The average follow-up time was 12.4 years. The hazard ratio for breast cancer was 1.23 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.70-2.17] for shifts without night work and 2.02 (95% CI 1.03-3.95) for shifts with night work. When including only women <60 years of age, the risk estimates were 1.18 (95% CI 0.67-2.07) for shifts without night work, and 2.15 (95% CI 1.10-4.21) for shifts with night work. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate an increased risk for breast cancer among women who work shifts that includes night work.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall. Sweden. Anders.Knutsson@miun.se  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0355-3140 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23007867 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 154  
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Author Romeo, S. et al. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Bright light exposure reduces TH-positive dopamine neurons: implications of light pollution in Parkinson's disease epidemiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 3 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Parkinson's disease; Cell death in the nervous system; Neural ageing; Risk factors  
  Abstract This study explores the effect of continuous exposure to bright light on neuromelanin formation and dopamine neuron survival in the substantia nigra. Twenty-one days after birth, Sprague–Dawley albino rats were divided into groups and raised under different conditions of light exposure. At the end of the irradiation period, rats were sacrificed and assayed for neuromelanin formation and number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the substantia nigra. The rats exposed to bright light for 20 days or 90 days showed a relatively greater number of neuromelanin-positive neurons. Surprisingly, TH-positive neurons decreased progressively in the substantia nigra reaching a significant 29% reduction after 90 days of continuous bright light exposure. This decrease was paralleled by a diminution of dopamine and its metabolite in the striatum. Remarkably, in preliminary analysis that accounted for population density, the age and race adjusted Parkinson's disease prevalence significantly correlated with average satellite-observed sky light pollution.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 382  
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