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Author Meyer, L.A.; Sullivan, S.M.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bright lights, big city: influences of ecological light pollution on reciprocal stream-riparian invertebrate fluxes Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Ecological Applications Abbreviated Journal Ecological Applications  
  Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 1322-1330  
  Keywords ecological light pollution; ecosystem function; stream–riparian invertebrate fluxes; tetragnathid spiders; urban streams  
  Abstract Cities produce considerable ecological light pollution (ELP), yet the effects of artificial night lighting on biological communities and ecosystem function have not been fully explored. From June 2010 to June 2011, we surveyed aquatic emergent insects, riparian arthropods entering the water, and riparian spiders of the family Tetragnathidae at nine stream reaches representing common ambient ELP levels of Columbus, Ohio, USA, streams (low, 0.1–0.5 lux; moderate, 0.6–2.0 lux; high, 2.1–4.0 lux). In August 2011, we experimentally increased light levels at the low- and moderate-treatment reaches to 10–12 lux to represent urban streams exposed to extremely high levels of ELP. Although season exerted the dominant influence on invertebrate fluxes over the course of the year, when analyzed by season, we found that light strongly influenced multiple invertebrate responses. The experimental light addition resulted in a 44% decrease in tetragnathid spider density (P = 0.035), decreases of 16% in family richness (P = 0.040) and 76% in mean body size (P = 0.022) of aquatic emergent insects, and a 309% increase in mean body size of terrestrial arthropods (P = 0.015). Our results provide evidence that artificial light sources can alter community structure and ecosystem function in streams via changes in reciprocal aquatic–terrestrial fluxes of invertebrates.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 102  
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Author Shimmura, Tsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Takashi url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian clock determines the timing of rooster crowing Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Current Biology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages R231–R233  
  Keywords animals; rooster; bird  
  Abstract Crowing of roosters is described by onomatopoetic terms such as ‘cock-a-doodle-doo’ (English), ‘ki-ke-ri-ki’ (German), and ‘ko-ke-kok-koh’ (Japanese). Rooster crowing is a symbol of the break of dawn in many countries. Indeed, crowing is frequently observed in the morning [1] . However, people also notice that crowing is sometimes observed at other times of day. Therefore, it is yet unclear whether crowing is under the control of an internal biological clock, or is simply caused by external stimuli. Here we show that predawn crowing is under the control of a circadian clock. Although external stimuli such as light and crowing by other individuals also induce roosters’ crowing, the magnitude of this induction is also regulated by a circadian clock.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1600  
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Author Grant, R.; Halliday, T.; Chadwick, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Amphibians' response to the lunar synodic cycle--a review of current knowledge, recommendations, and implications for conservation Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal Behavioral Ecology  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 53-62  
  Keywords amphibians; circular statistics; light; lunar cycle; moon phase; predator avoidance; reproductive synchronization; moonlight  
  Abstract The way in which amphibians respond to the geophysical changes brought about by the lunar synodic cycle is a neglected area of their ecology, but one which has recently generated interest. Knowledge of how amphibians respond to lunar phase is of intrinsic interest and also may be important for conservation and monitoring of populations. We surveyed the literature on amphibians’ responses to the lunar cycle and found 79 examples where moon phase in relation to amphibian behavior and ecology had been studied, across diverse amphibian taxa. Of the examples reviewed, most of them show some type of response to lunar phase, with only a few species being unaffected. We found that there is no significant difference between the numbers of species which increase, and those that decrease activity or reproductive behavior (including calling) during a full moon. The responses to the lunar cycle can not be generalized across taxonomic group, but instead are highly species specific and relate directly to the species’ ecology. The primary reasons for changes in amphibian behavior in response to the lunar cycle appear to be temporal synchronization of breeding and predator avoidance. Responses to changes in prey availability, facilitation of visual signalling and use of lunar cues in navigation and homing are less prevalent but merit further investigation. Comparisons between studies are hampered by differences in field and analytical methods; we therefore make a number of recommendations for future collection and analysis of data related to lunar phase.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 81  
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Author Ringwald, R.; Rönitzsch, H.; Riedel, M. url  openurl
  Title Praxishandbuch Öffentliche Beleuchtung – Wirtschaftlichkeit, Recht, Technik Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication 1. Aufl. DIN Deutsches Institut für Normung e.V., hrsg., Berlin Wien Zürich: Beuth Verlags GmbH. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1058  
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Author Nguyen, B.P.; Postma, E.; Ekkers, D.; Degener, F.; Mejier, T. url  openurl
  Title Bad Kissingen : a blueprint for future urban design Type Report
  Year 2013 Publication University Groningen Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords chronobiology, economy, society, urban design  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1061  
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Author Johnson, R.S.; Zhang, J.; Hyer, E.J.; Miller, S.D.; Reid, J.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Preliminary investigations toward nighttime aerosol optical depth retrievals from the VIIRS Day/Night Band Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Atmospheric Measurement Techniques Abbreviated Journal Atmos. Meas. Tech.  
  Volume 6 Issue 5 Pages 1245-1255  
  Keywords VIIRS; remote sensing; Suomi NPP; aerosol; optical depth; AERONET; light pollution; measurements  
  Abstract A great need exists for reliable nighttime aerosol products at high spatial and temporal resolution. In this concept demonstration study, using Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) observations on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite, a new method is proposed for retrieving nighttime aerosol optical depth (τ) using the contrast between regions with and without artificial surface lights. Evaluation of the retrieved τ values against daytime AERONET data from before and after the overpass of the VIIRS satellite over the Cape Verde, Grand Forks, and Alta Floresta AERONET stations yields a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.71. This study suggests that the VIIRS DNB has the potential to provide useful nighttime aerosol detection and property retrievals.  
  Address Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND, USA  
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  ISSN 1867-8548 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 200  
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Author Jones, A.; Noll, S.; Kausch, W.; Szyszka, C.; Kimeswenger, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An advanced scattered moonlight model for Cerro Paranal Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Astronomy & Astrophysics Abbreviated Journal A&A  
  Volume 560 Issue Pages A91  
  Keywords Moonlight  
  Abstract The largest natural source of light at night is the Moon, and it is the major contributor to the astronomical sky background. Being able to accurately predict the sky background, including scattered moonlight is important for scheduling astronomical observations. We have developed an improved scattered moonlight model, in which the components are computed with a better physical understanding as opposed to the simple empirical fit in the frequently used photometric model of Krisciunas & Schaefer (1991, PASP, 103, 1033). Our spectroscopic model can better trace the spectral trends of scattered moonlight for any position of the Moon and target observation. This is the first scattered moonlight model that we know of which is this physical and versatile. We have incorporated an observed solar spectrum, accurate lunar albedo fit, and elaborate scattering and absorption calculations that include scattering off of molecules and aerosols. It was designed for Cerro Paranal, but can be modified for any location with known atmospheric properties. Throughout the optical range, the uncertainty is less than 20%. This advanced scattered moonlight model can predict the amount of scattered moonlight for any given geometry of the Moon and target, and lunar phase for the entire optical spectrum.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6361 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1461  
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Author Ciocca, M.; Wang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title By the light of the silvery Moon: fact and fiction Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Physics Education Abbreviated Journal Phys. Educ.  
  Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 360-367  
  Keywords Vision; moonlight; Purkinje effect; Purkinje shift; mesopic  
  Abstract Is moonlight 'silver' or 'cold'? In this paper we discuss the interesting combination of factors that contribute to the common descriptions of moonlight. Sunlight is reflected from the lunar surface and red-shifted. When traversing the atmosphere, moonlight is further depleted of short wavelength content by Rayleigh scattering. We measured the spectra of the moonlight to show these effects and compared them with sunlight. All measurements, including spectral reflectance, suggest that moonlight is redder than sunlight. The silvery Moon is just an illusion due to the properties and behaviour of our own eyes, including the responses of rods and cones and the physiological perceptive phenomenon called Purkinje shift.  
  Address Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY, USA E-mail: marco.ciocca(at)eku.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9120 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2227  
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Ruhtz, T.; Lindemann, C.; Fischer, J.; Hölker, F. url  openurl
  Title Two camera system for measurement of urban uplight angular distribution Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication AIP Conf. Proc Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1531 Issue 568 Pages  
  Keywords Instrumentiation  
  Abstract The angular distribution function of light emitted from cities is unknown, and represents the most important systematic error in skyglow simulations. We describe a method for measuring this distribution using a two camera system mounted on an aerial platform. We present preliminary results from a test flight using such a system, taken over the city of Berlin on July 14, 2011.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 467  
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Author Bedrosian, T.A. (ed) pdf  url
openurl 
  Title Circadian Disruption by Light at Night: Implications for Mood Type Book Whole
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords circadian disruption; sleep; light at night; melanopsin; mood; mental health; Mood Disorders; epigenetics; red light  
  Abstract Life on Earth has adapted to a consistent 24-h solar cycle. Circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior remain synchronized to the environment using light as the most potent entraining cue. During the past century, however, the widespread adoption of electric light has led to `round-the-clock’ societies. Instead of aligning with the environment, individuals follow artificial and often erratic light cycles created by social and work schedules. In particular, exposure to artificial light at night (LAN), termed “light pollution”, has become pervasive over the past 100 years. Virtually every individual living in the U.S. and Europe experiences this aberrant light exposure, and moreover about 20% of the population performs shift work. LAN may disrupt physiological timekeeping, leading to dysregulation of internal processes and misalignment between behavior and the environment. Recent evidence suggests that individuals exposed to excessive LAN, such as night shift workers, have increased risk for depressive disorders, but the biological mechanism remains unspecified. In mammals, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) project light information to (1) the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus, regulating circadian rhythms, and (2) to limbic regions, putatively regulating mood. Thus, LAN has the potential to affect both circadian timekeeping and mood. In this dissertation, I present evidence from rodent studies supporting the novel hypothesis that night-time exposure to light disrupts circadian organization and contributes to depressed mood. First, I consider the physiological and behavioral consequences associated with unnatural exposure to LAN. The effects of LAN on circadian output are considered in terms of locomotor activity, the diurnal cortisol rhythm, and diurnal clock protein expression in the brain in Chapter 2. The influence of LAN on behavior and brain plasticity is discussed, with particular focus on depressive-like behavior (Chapter 3) and effects of SSRI treatment (Chapter 4). Effects of LAN on structural plasticity and gene expression in the brain are described, with emphasis on potential correlates of the depressive-like behavior observed under LAN in Chapter 5. Given the prevalence of LAN exposure and its importance, strategies for reversing the effects are offered. Specifically, eliminating LAN quickly reverses behavioral and physiological effects of exposure as described in Chapter 5. In Chapter 6 I report that administration of a pharmacological cytokine inhibitor prevents depressive-like behaviors in LAN, implicating brain inflammation in the behavioral effect. Finally, I demonstrate in Chapter 7 that exposure to red wavelength LAN reduces the effects on brain and behavior, suggesting that LAN acts through specific retinal pathways involving melanopsin. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the consequences of LAN, but also outline potential avenues for prevention or intervention.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience and The Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research The Ohio State University  
  Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor Bedrosian, T.A.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 323  
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