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Author Nickla, D.L.
Title Ocular diurnal rhythms and eye growth regulation: where we are 50 years after Lauber Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Experimental eye Research Abbreviated Journal Exp Eye Res
Volume (down) 114 Issue Pages 25-34
Keywords Vision; Human Health; Review
Abstract Many ocular processes show diurnal oscillations that optimize retinal function under the different conditions of ambient illumination encountered over the course of the 24 h light/dark cycle. Abolishing the diurnal cues by the use of constant darkness or constant light results in excessive ocular elongation, corneal flattening, and attendant refractive errors. A prevailing hypothesis is that the absence of the Zeitgeber of light and dark alters ocular circadian rhythms in some manner, and results in an inability of the eye to regulate its growth in order to achieve emmetropia, the matching of the front optics to eye length. Another visual manipulation that results in the eye growth system going into a “default” mode of excessive growth is form deprivation, in which a translucent diffuser deprives the eye of visual transients (spatial or temporal) while not significantly reducing light levels; these eyes rapidly elongate and become myopic. It has been hypothesized that form deprivation might constitute a type of “constant condition” whereby the absence of visual transients drives the eye into a similar default mode as that in response to constant light or dark. Interest in the potential influence of light cycles and ambient lighting in human myopia development has been spurred by a recent study showing a positive association between the amount of time that children spent outdoors and a reduced prevalence of myopia. The growing eyes of chickens and monkeys show a diurnal rhythm in axial length: Eyes elongate more during the day than during the night. There is also a rhythm in choroidal thickness that is in approximate anti-phase to the rhythm in eye length. The phases are altered in eyes growing too fast, in response to form deprivation or negative lenses, or too slowly, in response to myopic defocus, suggesting an influence of phase on the emmetropization system. Other potential rhythmic influences include dopamine and melatonin, which form a reciprocal feedback loop, and signal “day” and “night” respectively. Retinal dopamine is reduced during the day in form deprived myopic eyes, and dopamine D2 agonists inhibit ocular growth in animal models. Rhythms in intraocular pressure as well, may influence eye growth, perhaps as a mechanical stimulus triggering changes in scleral extracellular matrix synthesis. Finally, evidence shows varying influences of environmental lighting parameters on the emmetropization system, such as high intensity light being protective against myopia in chickens. This review will cover the evidence for the possible influence of these various factors on ocular growth. The recognition that ocular rhythms may play a role in emmetropization is a first step toward understanding how they may be manipulated in treatment therapies to prevent myopia in humans.
Address New England College of Optometry, Department of Biosciences, 424 Beacon Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. nicklad@neco.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0014-4835 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23298452; PMCID:PMC3742730 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1987
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Author Fritschi, L.; Erren, T.C.; Glass, D.C.; Girschik, J.; Thomson, A.K.; Saunders, C.; Boyle, T.; El-Zaemey, S.; Rogers, P.; Peters, S.; Slevin, T.; D'Orsogna, A.; de Vocht, F.; Vermeulen, R.; Heyworth, J.S.
Title The association between different night shiftwork factors and breast cancer: a case-control study Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer
Volume (down) 109 Issue 9 Pages 2472-2480
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Case-Control Studies; Female; Humans; Life Style; Middle Aged; Questionnaires; Risk; Risk Factors; Western Australia/epidemiology; *Work Schedule Tolerance; Young Adult; oncogenesis
Abstract BACKGROUND: Research on the possible association between shiftwork and breast cancer is complicated because there are many different shiftwork factors, which might be involved including: light at night, phase shift, sleep disruption and changes in lifestyle factors while on shiftwork (diet, physical activity, alcohol intake and low sun exposure). METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study in Western Australia from 2009 to 2011 with 1205 incident breast cancer cases and 1789 frequency age-matched controls. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect demographic, reproductive, and lifestyle factors and lifetime occupational history and a telephone interview was used to obtain further details about the shiftwork factors listed above. RESULTS: A small increase in risk was suggested for those ever doing the graveyard shift (work between midnight and 0500 hours) and breast cancer (odds ratio (OR)=1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.97-1.39). For phase shift, we found a 22% increase in breast cancer risk (OR=1.22, 95% CI=1.01-1.47) with a statistically significant dose-response relationship (P=0.04). For the other shiftwork factors, risks were marginally elevated and not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: We found some evidence that some of the factors involved in shiftwork may be associated with breast cancer but the ORs were low and there were inconsistencies in duration and dose-response relationships.
Address Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24022188; PMCID:PMC3817316 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 153
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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Iwamoto, J.; Okamoto, N.; Tomioka, K.; Nezu, S.; Ikada, Y.; Kurumatani, N.
Title Exposure to light at night, nocturnal urinary melatonin excretion, and obesity/dyslipidemia in the elderly: a cross-sectional analysis of the HEIJO-KYO study Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab
Volume (down) 98 Issue 1 Pages 337-344
Keywords *Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Dyslipidemias/complications/metabolism/*urine; Female; Humans; Japan; *Light; Male; Melatonin/secretion/*urine; Obesity/complications/metabolism/*urine; Photoperiod
Abstract CONTEXT: Obesity and exposure to light at night (LAN) have increased globally. Although LAN suppresses melatonin secretion and disturbs body mass regulation in experimental settings, its associations with melatonin secretion, obesity, and other metabolic consequences in uncontrolled home settings remain unclear. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the association of exposure to LAN in an uncontrolled home setting with melatonin secretion, obesity, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A cross-sectional study was performed in 528 elderly individuals (mean age, 72.8 yr). MEASURES: The intensity of LAN in the bedroom was measured at 1-min intervals during two consecutive nights, along with overnight urinary melatonin excretion and metabolic parameters. RESULTS: Compared with the Dim group (average <3 lux; n = 383), the LAN group (average >/=3 lux; n = 145) showed significantly higher body weight (adjusted mean, 58.8 vs. 56.6 kg; P = 0.01), body mass index (23.3 vs. 22.7 kg/m(2); P = 0.04), waist circumference (84.9 vs. 82.8 cm; P = 0.01), triglyceride levels (119.7 vs. 99.5 mg/dl; P < 0.01), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (128.6 vs. 122.2 mg/dl; P = 0.04), and showed significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (57.4 vs. 61.3 mg/dl; P = 0.02). These associations were independent of numerous potential confounders, including urinary melatonin excretion. Furthermore, LAN exposure is associated with higher odds ratios (ORs) for obesity (body mass index: OR, 1.89; P = 0.02; abdominal: OR, 1.62; P = 0.04) and dyslipidemia (OR, 1.72; P = 0.02) independent of demographic and socioeconomic parameters. In contrast, urinary melatonin excretion and glucose parameters did not show significant differences between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to LAN in an uncontrolled home setting is associated with impaired obese and lipid parameters independent of nocturnal urinary melatonin excretion in elderly individuals. Moreover, LAN exposure is associated with higher ORs for obesity and dyslipidemia independent of demographic and socioeconomic parameters.
Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, 840 Shijocho, Kashiharashi, Nara, 634-8521, Japan. obayashi@naramed-u.ac.jp
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23118419 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 168
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Author Solbrig, J.E.; Lee, T.E.; Miller, S.D.
Title Advances in Remote Sensing: Imaging the Earth by Moonlight Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union Abbreviated Journal Eos Trans. AGU
Volume (down) 94 Issue 40 Pages 349-350
Keywords Remote Sensing; night; visible; VIIRS
Abstract Earth's nighttime environment is being revealed in unprecedented detail by the new satellite-mounted Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). VIIRS' Day/Night Band (DNB) is a highly sensitive broadband visible channel capable of detecting light from cities and other terrestrial emission sources.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0096-3941 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 486
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Author Upham, N.S.; Hafner, J.C.
Title Do nocturnal rodents in the Great Basin Desert avoid moonlight? Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Mammalogy Abbreviated Journal Journal of Mammalogy
Volume (down) 94 Issue 1 Pages 59-72
Keywords Animals; Moonlight
Abstract Rodents make foraging decisions by balancing demands to acquire energy and mates with the need to avoid predators. To identify variations in the risk of predation, nocturnal rodents may use moonlight as a cue of risk. Moonlight avoidance behaviors have been observed in many nocturnal rodent species and are widely generalized to small mammals. However, most prior studies have been limited to 1 species or 1 study site, or occurred in modified habitats. We evaluated desert rodent activity patterns in natural habitats from 1999 to 2006 at 62 study sites across the Great Basin Desert of western North America. Rodent activity was examined by livetrapping in open habitats, using the presence of the sand-obligate kangaroo mouse (Microdipodops) as a habitat indicator. Activity patterns were assessed on 69 nights with clear skies and compared to corresponding moonlight values (moon phase and brightness) to evaluate the frequency of moonlight avoidance. Analyses of total activity of all species in the rodent assemblage relative to moonlight showed a distinct nonrandom (triangular-shaped) pattern but no significant correlations. However, individual genera of desert rodents responded differently to moonlight. Only kangaroo rats (Dipodomys) displayed significant moonlight avoidance patterns; they were maximally active at significantly different moonlight levels and avoided bright moonlight to a greater extent than co-occurring rodents. Moonlight seemed to limit the activity of kangaroo rats most strongly on bright nights during waxing moon phases and summer seasons, but not significantly during the spring or fall seasons, or during waning moons. Rather than avoiding moonlight, the activity of deer mice (Peromyscus), pocket mice (Perognathus), and kangaroo mice may be governed by changes in competition with kangaroo rats. Differences in the body size, locomotion, and space use of kangaroo rats relative to other rodents may explain why different moonlight responses were detected, especially if these traits alter how rodents perceive risk from bright moonlight. These findings indicate that moonlight avoidance may be a specialized trait of kangaroo rats rather than a general behavior of nocturnal desert rodents in the Great Basin.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-2372 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1555
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Author Brainard, G.C.; Coyle, W.; Ayers, M.; Kemp, J.; Warfield, B.; Maida, J.; Bowen, C.; Bernecker, C.; Lockley, S.W.; Hanifin, J.P.
Title Solid-state lighting for the International Space Station: Tests of visual performance and melatonin regulation Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Acta Astronautica Abbreviated Journal Acta Astronautica
Volume (down) 92 Issue 1 Pages 21-28
Keywords Human Health; Lighting
Abstract The International Space Station (ISS) uses General Luminaire Assemblies (GLAs) that house fluorescent lamps for illuminating the astronauts' working and living environments. Solid-state light emitting diodes (LEDs) are attractive candidates for replacing the GLAs on the ISS. The advantages of LEDs over conventional fluorescent light sources include lower up-mass, power consumption and heat generation, as well as fewer toxic materials, greater resistance to damage and long lamp life. A prototype Solid-State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) was developed and successfully installed on the ISS. The broad aim of the ongoing work is to test light emitted by prototype SSLAs for supporting astronaut vision and assessing neuroendocrine, circadian, neurobehavioral and sleep effects. Three completed ground-based studies are presented here including experiments on visual performance, color discrimination, and acute plasma melatonin suppression in cohorts of healthy, human subjects under different SSLA light exposure conditions within a high-fidelity replica of the ISS Crew Quarters (CQ). All visual tests were done under indirect daylight at 201 lx, fluorescent room light at 531 lx and 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ at 1266 lx. Visual performance was assessed with numerical verification tests (NVT). NVT data show that there are no significant differences in score (F=0.73, p=0.48) or time (F=0.14, p=0.87) for subjects performing five contrast tests (10%–100%). Color discrimination was assessed with Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue tests (FM-100). The FM-100 data showed no significant differences (F=0.01, p=0.99) in color discrimination for indirect daylight, fluorescent room light and 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ. Plasma melatonin suppression data show that there are significant differences (F=29.61, p<0.0001) across the percent change scores of plasma melatonin for five corneal irradiances, ranging from 0 to 405 &#956;W/cm2 of 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ (0–1270 lx). Risk factors for the health and safety of astronauts include disturbed circadian rhythms and altered sleep–wake patterns. These studies will help determine if SSLA lighting can be used both to support astronaut vision and serve as an in-flight countermeasure for circadian desynchrony, sleep disruption and cognitive performance deficits on the ISS.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0094-5765 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1533
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Author van der Burght, B.W.; Hansen, M.; Olsen, J.; Zhou, J.; Wu, Y.; Nissen, M.H.; Sparrow, J.R.
Title Early changes in gene expression induced by blue light irradiation of A2E-laden retinal pigment epithelial cells Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Acta Ophthalmologica Abbreviated Journal Acta Ophthalmol
Volume (down) 91 Issue 7 Pages e537-45
Keywords Apoptosis; Cell Line; Cell Survival; Gene Expression Regulation/*physiology; Humans; Light; Lipofuscin/genetics; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; Principal Component Analysis; Pyridinium Compounds; RNA, Messenger/genetics; Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction; Retinal Pigment Epithelium/metabolism/pathology/*radiation effects; Retinoids/*genetics; Transcriptome; A2e; age-related macular degeneration; apoptosis; complement cascade; gene expression; retinal pigment epithelial cells; blue light; retinal pigment epithelial; epigenetics
Abstract PURPOSE: Accumulation of bisretinoids as lipofuscin in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is implicated in the pathogenesis of some blinding diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To identify genes whose expression may change under conditions of bisretinoid accumulation, we investigated the differential gene expression in RPE cells that had accumulated the lipofuscin fluorophore A2E and were exposed to blue light (430 nm). METHODS: A2E-laden RPE cells were exposed to blue light (A2E/430 nm) at various time intervals. Cell death was quantified using Dead Red staining, and RNA levels for the entire genome was determined using DNA microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome 2.0 Plus). Array results for selected genes were confirmed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Principal component analysis revealed that the A2E-laden RPE cells irradiated with blue light were clearly distinguishable from the control samples. We found differential regulation of genes belonging to the following functional groups: transcription factors, stress response, apoptosis and immune response. Among the last mentioned were downregulation of four genes that coded for proteins that have an inhibitory effect on the complement cascade: (complement factor H, complement factor H-related 1, complement factor I and vitronectin) and of two belonging to the classical pathway (complement component 1, s subcomponent and complement component 1, r subcomponent). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that blue light irradiation of A2E-laden RPE cells can alter the transcription of genes belonging to different functional pathways including stress response, apoptosis and the immune response. We suggest that these molecules may be associated to the pathogenesis of AMD and can potentially serve as future therapeutic targets.
Address Department of International Health, Immunology and Microbiology, Eye Research Unit, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkDepartment of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkDepartment of Ophthalmology, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1755-375X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23742627 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 346
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Author Shimose, T.; Yokawa, K.; Tachihara, K.
Title Higher Catch Rates Around the Full Moon for Blue Marlin, Makaira Nigricans, in a Diurnal Trolling Fishery Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Bulletin of Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Bms
Volume (down) 89 Issue 3 Pages 759-765
Keywords fish; blue marlin; Makaira nigricans; Moon; moonlight; Feeding Behavior
Abstract The relationship between lunar phase and catch rates of blue marlin, Makaira nigricans Lacépède, 1802, in a diurnal trolling fishery at Yonaguni Island, southwestern Japan, was investigated. The mean catch per unit effort of blue marlin to lunar day was expressed by a periodic regression and significantly increased around the full moon. The stomach content index also significantly increased around the full moon in small blue marlin (<200 cm lower jaw–fork length), indicating that diurnal feeding activities of blue marlin increased around the full moon, especially for smaller individuals. The diurnal feeding activity is thought to be influenced by the nighttime activities of blue marlin and/or prey movements.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-4977 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 63
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Author Chamorro, E.; Bonnin-Arias, C.; Perez-Carrasco, M.J.; Munoz de Luna, J.; Vazquez, D.; Sanchez-Ramos, C.
Title Effects of light-emitting diode radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Photochemistry and Photobiology Abbreviated Journal Photochem Photobiol
Volume (down) 89 Issue 2 Pages 468-473
Keywords Human Health; Apoptosis/*radiation effects; Biological Markers/metabolism; Caspases/metabolism; Cell Survival/radiation effects; DNA Damage; Epithelial Cells/cytology/metabolism/*radiation effects; Histones/metabolism; Humans; Light; Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial/*radiation effects; Mitochondria/*radiation effects; Photoperiod; Primary Cell Culture; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism; Retinal Pigment Epithelium/cytology/metabolism/*radiation effects
Abstract Human visual system is exposed to high levels of natural and artificial lights of different spectra and intensities along lifetime. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are the basic lighting components in screens of PCs, phones and TV sets; hence it is so important to know the implications of LED radiations on the human visual system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LEDs radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPEpiC). They were exposed to three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles, using blue-468 nm, green-525 nm, red-616 nm and white light. Cellular viability of HRPEpiC was evaluated by labeling all nuclei with DAPI; Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined by H2DCFDA staining; mitochondrial membrane potential was quantified by TMRM staining; DNA damage was determined by H2AX histone activation, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspases-3,-7 activation. It is shown that LED radiations decrease 75-99% cellular viability, and increase 66-89% cellular apoptosis. They also increase ROS production and DNA damage. Fluorescence intensity of apoptosis was 3.7% in nonirradiated cells and 88.8%, 86.1%, 83.9% and 65.5% in cells exposed to white, blue, green or red light, respectively. This study indicates three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles of exposure to LED lighting affect in vitro HRPEpiC.
Address Neuro-Computing and Neuro-Robotics Research Group, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. eva.chamorro@opt.ucm.es
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-8655 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22989198 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 511
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Author Gaston, K.J.; Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Hopkins, J.
Title The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution: a mechanistic appraisal Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society Abbreviated Journal Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc
Volume (down) 88 Issue 4 Pages 912-927
Keywords dark; information; light; moonlight; night; pollution; resources; rhythms; time
Abstract The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution have been a longstanding source of concern, accentuated by realized and projected growth in electrical lighting. As human communities and lighting technologies develop, artificial light increasingly modifies natural light regimes by encroaching on dark refuges in space, in time, and across wavelengths. A wide variety of ecological implications of artificial light have been identified. However, the primary research to date is largely focused on the disruptive influence of nighttime light on higher vertebrates, and while comprehensive reviews have been compiled along taxonomic lines and within specific research domains, the subject is in need of synthesis within a common mechanistic framework. Here we propose such a framework that focuses on the cross-factoring of the ways in which artificial lighting alters natural light regimes (spatially, temporally, and spectrally), and the ways in which light influences biological systems, particularly the distinction between light as a resource and light as an information source. We review the evidence for each of the combinations of this cross-factoring. As artificial lighting alters natural patterns of light in space, time and across wavelengths, natural patterns of resource use and information flows may be disrupted, with downstream effects to the structure and function of ecosystems. This review highlights: (i) the potential influence of nighttime lighting at all levels of biological organisation (from cell to ecosystem); (ii) the significant impact that even low levels of nighttime light pollution can have; and (iii) the existence of major research gaps, particularly in terms of the impacts of light at population and ecosystem levels, identification of intensity thresholds, and the spatial extent of impacts in the vicinity of artificial lights.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9EZ, U.K
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3231 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23565807 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 14
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