toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Mazor, T.; Levin, N.; Possingham, H.P.; Levy, Y.; Rocchini, D.; Richardson, A.J.; Kark, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Can satellite-based night lights be used for conservation? The case of nesting sea turtles in the Mediterranean Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume (down) 159 Issue Pages 63-72  
  Keywords Artificial night lights; Caretta caretta; Chelonia mydas; Coastal conservation; Satellite imagery; Sea turtle conservation  
  Abstract Artificial night lights pose a major threat to multiple species. However, this threat is often disregarded in conservation management and action because it is difficult to quantify its effect. Increasing availability of high spatial-resolution satellite images may enable us to better incorporate this threat into future work, particularly in highly modified ecosystems such as the coastal zone. In this study we examine the potential of satellite night light imagery to predict the distribution of the endangered loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and green (Chelonia mydas) sea turtle nests in the eastern Mediterranean coastline. Using remote sensing tools and high resolution data derived from the SAC-C satellite and the International Space Station, we examined the relationship between the long term spatial patterns of sea turtle nests and the intensity of night lights along Israel’s entire Mediterranean coastline. We found that sea turtles nests are negatively related to night light intensity and are concentrated in darker sections along the coast. Our resulting GLMs showed that night lights were a significant factor for explaining the distribution of sea turtle nests. Other significant variables included: cliff presence, human population density and infrastructure. This study is one of the first to show that night lights estimated with satellite-based imagery can be used to help explain sea turtle nesting activity at a detailed resolution over large areas. This approach can facilitate the management of species affected by night lights, and will be particularly useful in areas that are inaccessible or where broad-scale prioritization of conservation action is required.  
  Address ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 213  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Longcore, T.; Rich, C.; Mineau, P.; MacDonald, B.; Bert, D.G.; Sullivan, L.M.; Mutrie, E.; Gauthreaux Jr., S.A.; Avery, M.L.; Crawford, R.L.; Manville II, A.M.; Travis, E.R.; Drake, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Avian mortality at communication towers in the United States and Canada: which species, how many, and where? Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume (down) 158 Issue Pages 410-419  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Birds migrating to and from breeding grounds in the United States and Canada are killed by the millions in collisions with lighted towers and their guy wires. Avian mortality at towers is highly variable across species, and the importance to each population depends on its size and trajectory. Building on our previous estimate of avian mortality at communication towers, we calculated mortality by species and by regions. To do this, we constructed a database of mortality by species at towers from available records and calculated the mean proportion of each species killed at towers within aggregated Bird Conservation Regions. These proportions were combined with mortality estimates that we previously calculated for those regions. We then compared our estimated bird mortality rates to the estimated populations of these species in the United States and Canada. Neotropical migrants suffer the greatest mortality; 97.4% of birds killed are passerines, mostly warblers (Parulidae, 58.4%), vireos (Vireonidae, 13.4%), thrushes (Turdidae, 7.7%), and sparrows (Emberizidae, 5.8%). Thirteen birds of conservation concern in the United States or Canada suffer annual mortality of 1–9% of their estimated total population. Of these, estimated annual mortality is >2% for Yellow Rail (Coturnicops noveboracensis), Swainson’s Warbler (Limnothlypis swainsonii), Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps), Bay-breasted Warbler (Setophaga castanea), Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera), Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum), Prairie Warbler (Setophaga discolor), and Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla). Avian mortality from anthropogenic sources is almost always reported in the aggregate (“number of birds killed”), which cannot detect the species-level effects necessary to make conservation assessments. Our approach to per species estimates could be undertaken for other sources of chronic anthropogenic mortality.  
  Address Communication towers; Mortality; Night lighting; Neotropical migrants; Collisions; Impact assessment; birds  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 54  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Riley, W. D.; Davison, P. I.; Maxwell, D. L.; Bendall, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Street lighting delays and disrupts the dispersal of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fry Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Biological conservation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 158 Issue Pages 140-146  
  Keywords animals; fish; animal behaviour  
  Abstract There has been a decline in the abundance of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) despite significant conservation measures designed to reduce fishing mortality. Populations at the southern edge of their historical distribution, where anthropogenic impacts on the freshwater environment may be greater, have suffered the largest decline. In this investigation, we compared the timing of Atlantic salmon fry dispersal from incubators in an aquarium under control and ecologically relevant broad spectrum street-lit conditions (median night light intensity = 12 lx). Fry dispersal occurred 2.8 days later (F = 82.9, df = 1,8, p < 0.001), and on average the fry were smaller at dispersal (0.017 g, se = 0.0012, p < 0.001, n = 730), in the incubators exposed to street lighting. Significant disruption to the diel pattern of fry dispersal was also observed. Dispersal under control conditions was significantly directed around a mean time of 4:17 h after dusk (p < 0.001, r = 0.76, n = 1990) with very few fry (<2%) dispersing during daylight hours. Under street lighting, the dispersal of fry was significantly delayed (mean time 6:38 h after dusk; p < 0.001, r = 0.39, n = 2413) with a significant proportion (32%) dispersing during daylight hours. Survival to dispersal in the controlled aquarium conditions was not lower under street-lit conditions (p = 0.21, n = 5000 eggs across 10 incubators). However, in the wild, the period between fry emergence and the establishment of feeding territories is considered to be of critical importance in the dynamics of salmonid populations and any disruption may reduce fitness.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1599  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fonken, L.K.; Lieberman, R.A.; Weil, Z.M.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim light at night exaggerates weight gain and inflammation associated with a high-fat diet in male mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Endocrinology  
  Volume (down) 154 Issue 10 Pages 3817-3825  
  Keywords Adipose Tissue, White/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Animals; Antigens, CD11b/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Appetite Regulation/*radiation effects; Arcuate Nucleus/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Behavior, Animal/radiation effects; Circadian Rhythm; Cytokines/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Diet, High-Fat/*adverse effects; Feeding Behavior/radiation effects; Gene Expression Regulation; Glucose Intolerance/etiology/immunology/metabolism/pathology; I-kappa B Kinase/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Insulin Resistance; Lighting/*adverse effects; Male; Mice; Microglia/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Nerve Tissue Proteins/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Obesity/*etiology/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Random Allocation; *Weight Gain  
  Abstract Elevated nighttime light exposure is associated with symptoms of metabolic syndrome. In industrialized societies, high-fat diet (HFD) and exposure to light at night (LAN) often cooccur and may contribute to the increasing obesity epidemic. Thus, we hypothesized that dim LAN (dLAN) would provoke additional and sustained body mass gain in mice on a HFD. Male mice were housed in either a standard light/dark cycle or dLAN and fed either chow or HFD. Exposure to dLAN and HFD increase weight gain, reduce glucose tolerance, and alter insulin secretion as compared with light/dark cycle and chow, respectively. The effects of dLAN and HFD appear additive, because mice exposed to dLAN that were fed HFD display the greatest increases in body mass. Exposure to both dLAN and HFD also change the timing of food intake and increase TNFalpha and MAC1 gene expression in white adipose tissue after 4 experimental weeks. Changes in MAC1 gene expression occur more rapidly due to HFD as compared with dLAN; after 5 days of experimental conditions, mice fed HFD already increase MAC1 gene expression in white adipose tissue. HFD also elevates microglia activation in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and hypothalamic TNFalpha, IL-6, and Ikbkb gene expression. Microglia activation is increased by dLAN, but only among chow-fed mice and dLAN does not affect inflammatory gene expression. These results suggest that dLAN exaggerates weight gain and peripheral inflammation associated with HFD.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, 636 Biomedical Research Tower, 460 West 12th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210. fonken.1@osu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-7227 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23861373 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 93  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Iwamoto, J.; Ikada, Y.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to light at night and risk of depression in the elderly Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Affective Disorders Abbreviated Journal J Affect Disord  
  Volume (down) 151 Issue 1 Pages 331-336  
  Keywords Aged; Circadian Rhythm; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression/*etiology; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Melatonin/urine; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Risk Factors; Circadian rhythm; Daytime light; Depression; Elderly; Light at night; Melatonin; Mental Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Recent advances in understanding the fundamental links between chronobiology and depressive disorders have enabled exploring novel risk factors for depression in the field of biological rhythms. Increased exposure to light at night (LAN) is common in modern life, and LAN exposure is associated with circadian misalignment. However, whether LAN exposure in home settings is associated with depression remains unclear. METHODS: We measured the intensities of nighttime bedroom light and ambulatory daytime light along with overnight urinary melatonin excretion (UME) in 516 elderly individuals (mean age, 72.8). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale. RESULTS: The median nighttime light intensity was 0.8lx (interquartile range, 0.2-3.3). The depressed group (n=101) revealed significantly higher prevalence of LAN exposure (average intensity, >/= 5 lx) compared with that of the nondepressed group (n=415) using a multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for daytime light exposure, insomnia, hypertension, sleep duration, and physical activity [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.89; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-3.25; P=0.02]. Consistently, another parameter of LAN exposure (duration of intensity >/= 10 lx, >/= 30 min) was significantly more prevalent in the depressed than in the nondepressed group (adjusted OR: 1.71; 95% CI, 1.01-2.89; P=0.046). In contrast, UME was not significantly associated with depressive symptoms. LIMITATION: Cross-sectional analysis. CONCLUSION: These results suggested that LAN exposure in home settings is significantly associated with depressive symptoms in the general elderly population. The risk of depression may be reduced by keeping nighttime bedroom dark.  
  Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Nara, Japan. obayashi@naramed-u.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0165-0327 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23856285 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 165  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Menegaux, F.; Truong, T.; Anger, A.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Lamkarkach, F.; Arveux, P.; Kerbrat, P.; Fevotte, J.; Guenel, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night work and breast cancer: a population-based case-control study in France (the CECILE study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume (down) 132 Issue 4 Pages 924-931  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Aged; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm; Employment; Female; France/epidemiology; Humans; Middle Aged; Occupations; Pregnancy; Risk Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract Night work involving disruption of circadian rhythm was suggested as a possible cause of breast cancer. We examined the role of night work in a large population-based case-control study carried out in France between 2005 and 2008. Lifetime occupational history including work schedules of each night work period was elicited in 1,232 cases of breast cancer and 1,317 population controls. Thirteen percent of the cases and 11% of the controls had ever worked on night shifts (OR = 1.27 [95% confidence interval = 0.99-1.64]). Odds ratios were 1.35 [1.01-1.80] in women who worked on overnight shifts, 1.40 [1.01-1.92] in women who had worked at night for 4.5 or more years, and 1.43 [1.01-2.03] in those who worked less than three nights per week on average. The odds ratio was 1.95 [1.13-3.35] in women employed in night work for >4 years before their first full-term pregnancy, a period where mammary gland cells are incompletely differentiated and possibly more susceptible to circadian disruption effects. Our results support the hypothesis that night work plays a role in breast cancer, particularly in women who started working at night before first full-term pregnancy.  
  Address Inserm, CESP Center for research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, Villejuif, France; Univ Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22689255 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 781  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kocifaj, M.; Solano Lamphar, H.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Skyglow effects in UV and visible spectra: radiative fluxes Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage  
  Volume (down) 127 Issue Pages 300-307  
  Keywords Animals; Darkness; Environmental Exposure/*analysis; *Light; Models, Theoretical; *Ultraviolet Rays; Light pollution; Optical thickness; Public lighting system; Two stream approximation  
  Abstract Several studies have tried to understand the mechanisms and effects of radiative transfer under different night-sky conditions. However, most of these studies are limited to the various effects of visible spectra. Nevertheless, the invisible parts of the electromagnetic spectrum can pose a more profound threat to nature. One visible threat is from what is popularly termed skyglow. Such skyglow is caused by injudiciously situated or designed artificial night lighting systems which degrade desired sky viewing. Therefore, since lamp emissions are not limited to visible electromagnetic spectra, it is necessary to consider the complete spectrum of such lamps in order to understand the physical behaviour of diffuse radiation at terrain level. In this paper, the downward diffuse radiative flux is computed in a two-stream approximation and obtained ultraviolet spectral radiative fluxes are inter-related with luminous fluxes. Such a method then permits an estimate of ultraviolet radiation if the traditionally measured illuminance on a horizontal plane is available. The utility of such a comparison of two spectral bands is shown, using the different lamp types employed in street lighting. The data demonstrate that it is insufficient to specify lamp type and its visible flux production independently of each other. Also the UV emissions have to be treated by modellers and environmental scientists because some light sources can be fairly important pollutants in the near ultraviolet. Such light sources can affect both the living organisms and ambient environment.  
  Address ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 9, Dubravska Road, 845 03 Bratislava, Slovak Republic. kocifaj@savba.sk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23792881 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 265  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Duriscoe, D.M. url  openurl
  Title Measuring Anthropogenic Sky Glow Using a Natural Sky Brightness Model. Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 125 Issue 933 Pages 1370-1382  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract Anthropogenic sky glow (a result of light pollution) combines with the natural background brightness of the night sky when viewed by an observer on the earth’s surface. In order to measure the anthropogenic component accurately, the natural component must be identified and subtracted. A model of the moonless natural sky brightness in the V-band was constructed from existing data on the Zodiacal Light, an airglow model based on the van Rhijn function, and a model of integrated starlight (including diffuse galactic light) constructed from images made with the same equipment used for sky brightness observations. The model also incorporates effective extinction by the atmosphere and is improved at high zenith angles (>80°) by the addition of atmospheric diffuse light. The model may be projected onto local horizon coordinates for a given observation at a resolution of 0.05° over the hemisphere of the sky, allowing it to be accurately registered with data images obtained from any site. Zodiacal Light and integrated starlight models compare favorably with observations from remote dark sky sites, matching within ± 8 nL over 95% of the sky. The natural airglow may be only approximately modeled, errors of up to ± 25 nL are seen when the airglow is rapidly changing or has considerable character (banding); ± 8 nL precision may be expected under favorable conditions. When subtracted from all-sky brightness data images, the model significantly improves estimates of sky glow from anthropogenic sources, especially at sites that experience slight to moderate light pollution.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 539  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Forbes, C.; Hammill, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Fear in the dark? Community-level effects of non-lethal predators change with light regime Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Oikos Abbreviated Journal Oikos  
  Volume (down) 122 Issue 12 Pages 1662-1668  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0030-1299 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 597  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liao, L.B.; Weiss, S.; Mills, S.; Hauss, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Suomi NPP VIIRS day-night band on-orbit performance: VIIRS DAY-NIGHT BAND PERFORMANCE Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res. Atmos.  
  Volume (down) 118 Issue 22 Pages 12,705-12,718  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2169897X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 956  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: