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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Do artificially illuminated skies affect biodiversity in nocturnal landscapes? Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal Landscape Ecol  
  Volume (down) 28 Issue 9 Pages 1637-1640  
  Keywords skyglow; light pollution; biodiversity  
  Abstract The skyglow from cities at night is one of the most dramatic modifications that humans have made to Earth’s biosphere, and it is increasingly extending into nocturnal landscapes (nightscapes) far beyond urban areas. This scattered light is dim and homogenous compared to a lit street, but can be bright compared to natural celestial light sources, such as stars. Because of the large area of Earth affected by artificial skyglow, it is essential to verify whether skyglow is a selective pressure in nocturnal landscapes. We propose two scientific approaches that could examine whether skyglow affects biodiversity.  
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  ISSN 0921-2973 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 35  
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Author Femia, N.; Fortunato, M.; Vitelli, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light-to-Light: PV-Fed LED Lighting Systems Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics Abbreviated Journal IEEE Trans. Power Electron.  
  Volume (down) 28 Issue 8 Pages 4063-4073  
  Keywords light-to-light systems; outdoor lighting; lighting technology; LED; LED lighting; photovoltaics; PV  
  Abstract This paper discusses the principle of operation, dynamic modeling, and control design for light-to-light (LtL) systems, whose aim is to directly convert the sun irradiation into artificial light. The system discussed in this paper is composed by a photovoltaic (PV) panel, an LED array, a dc-dc converter dedicated to the maximum power point tracking of the PV panel and a dc-dc converter dedicated to drive the LEDs array. A system controller is also included, whose goal is to ensure the matching between the maximum available PV power and the LED power by means of a low-frequency LEDs dimming. An experimental design example is discussed to illustrate the functionalities of the LtL system.  
  Address Dipt. di Ing. Elettron. e Ing. Inf., Univ. of Salerno, Salerno, Italy  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0885-8993 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 331  
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Author Grant, R.; Halliday, T.; Chadwick, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Amphibians' response to the lunar synodic cycle--a review of current knowledge, recommendations, and implications for conservation Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal Behavioral Ecology  
  Volume (down) 24 Issue 1 Pages 53-62  
  Keywords amphibians; circular statistics; light; lunar cycle; moon phase; predator avoidance; reproductive synchronization; moonlight  
  Abstract The way in which amphibians respond to the geophysical changes brought about by the lunar synodic cycle is a neglected area of their ecology, but one which has recently generated interest. Knowledge of how amphibians respond to lunar phase is of intrinsic interest and also may be important for conservation and monitoring of populations. We surveyed the literature on amphibians’ responses to the lunar cycle and found 79 examples where moon phase in relation to amphibian behavior and ecology had been studied, across diverse amphibian taxa. Of the examples reviewed, most of them show some type of response to lunar phase, with only a few species being unaffected. We found that there is no significant difference between the numbers of species which increase, and those that decrease activity or reproductive behavior (including calling) during a full moon. The responses to the lunar cycle can not be generalized across taxonomic group, but instead are highly species specific and relate directly to the species’ ecology. The primary reasons for changes in amphibian behavior in response to the lunar cycle appear to be temporal synchronization of breeding and predator avoidance. Responses to changes in prey availability, facilitation of visual signalling and use of lunar cues in navigation and homing are less prevalent but merit further investigation. Comparisons between studies are hampered by differences in field and analytical methods; we therefore make a number of recommendations for future collection and analysis of data related to lunar phase.  
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  ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 81  
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Author Bolshakov, C.V.; Bulyuk, V.N.; Sinelschikova, A.Y.; Vorotkov, M.V. url  openurl
  Title Influence of the vertical light beam on numbers and flight trajectories of night-migrating songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Avian Ecol. Behav. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 24 Issue Pages 35–49  
  Keywords Animals; nocturnal migration; light pollution; numbers; flight track; extrinsic factors  
  Abstract In this paper we analyse the data obtained in the automatic regime by the Optical Electronic Device (OED, Vorotkov et al. 2009; Bolshakov et al. 2010) for autumn nocturnal passage of passerines on the Courish Spit on the Baltic Sea and estimate: (1) numbers aloft under differ- ent types of wind (following wind, opposing wind and calm conditions); (2) flight trajectories in the 5° cone of white light. We found that under natural nocturnal illumination conditions, the vertical cone of white light impacts the detectable numbers aloft and disturbs straight flight trajectories. The OED data obtained throughout the night suggest, after correction for ground speed and the mean flight altitude, the actual number of birds in the light cone peaks at calm conditions, is halved under following winds which are optimal for passage and is 21 times lower under unfavourable headwinds. It is assumed that high numbers in the light cone under calm conditions is an artefact of bird attraction by light and their concentration around the searchlights. The OED data obtained for midnight ±1 hour, flying migrants respond to the vertical light cone under all types of wind conditions by altering their straight flight trajec- tories. However, this response is most apparent in still air conditions. The proportion of birds that change their flight track reaches 43%. We assume that under such conditions some birds are not only attracted to the illuminated zone at low altitudes, but, besides slowing down their ground speed, change their trajectories to the degree of flying in circles. To determine combi- nations of factors and to test for their possible impact on the probability of response to light, we used a binary logistic regression. The presence of birds with straight vs. curved tracks was used as the dependent variable. Final logistic models obtained for midnight ±1 hour for calm conditions and headwinds, suggest that occurrence probability of songbirds with curvilinear flight tracks is higher for small birds, when no or just a small part of Moon disk is visible and under high air humidity. Under headwinds the probability of occurrence of birds flying curvi- linear tracks is also higher under overcast. For following winds, the probability of occurrence birds flying curvilinearly was higher when many small birds were aloft, when air humidity was high and when wind was not strictly following. Unlike other wind situations, this model did not include the size of visible part of the Moon disk as a significant factor. The increase of occurrence of curvilinear flight tracks through the light beam when winds were not exactly following was probably caused by the problems with compensating the lateral component of tailwinds under high velocities, especially by small birds.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 378  
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Author Meyer, L.A.; Sullivan, S.M.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bright lights, big city: influences of ecological light pollution on reciprocal stream-riparian invertebrate fluxes Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Ecological Applications Abbreviated Journal Ecological Applications  
  Volume (down) 23 Issue 6 Pages 1322-1330  
  Keywords ecological light pollution; ecosystem function; stream–riparian invertebrate fluxes; tetragnathid spiders; urban streams  
  Abstract Cities produce considerable ecological light pollution (ELP), yet the effects of artificial night lighting on biological communities and ecosystem function have not been fully explored. From June 2010 to June 2011, we surveyed aquatic emergent insects, riparian arthropods entering the water, and riparian spiders of the family Tetragnathidae at nine stream reaches representing common ambient ELP levels of Columbus, Ohio, USA, streams (low, 0.1–0.5 lux; moderate, 0.6–2.0 lux; high, 2.1–4.0 lux). In August 2011, we experimentally increased light levels at the low- and moderate-treatment reaches to 10–12 lux to represent urban streams exposed to extremely high levels of ELP. Although season exerted the dominant influence on invertebrate fluxes over the course of the year, when analyzed by season, we found that light strongly influenced multiple invertebrate responses. The experimental light addition resulted in a 44% decrease in tetragnathid spider density (P = 0.035), decreases of 16% in family richness (P = 0.040) and 76% in mean body size (P = 0.022) of aquatic emergent insects, and a 309% increase in mean body size of terrestrial arthropods (P = 0.015). Our results provide evidence that artificial light sources can alter community structure and ecosystem function in streams via changes in reciprocal aquatic–terrestrial fluxes of invertebrates.  
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  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 102  
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