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Author (up) Coleman, G.; Gigg, J.; Canal, M.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Postnatal light alters hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function and induces a depressive-like phenotype in adult mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume 44 Issue 10 Pages 2807-2817  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The postnatal light environment that a mouse experiences during the critical first 3 postnatal weeks has long-term effects on both its circadian rhythm output and clock gene expression. Furthermore, data from our lab suggest that postnatal light may also impact the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which is a key regulator of stress. To test the effect of postnatal light exposure on adult stress responses and circadian rhythmicity, we raised mice under either 24-h light-dark cycles (LD), constant light (LL) or constant dark (DD) during the first 3 postnatal weeks. After weaning we then exposed all animals to LD cycles (basal conditions), followed by LL (stressed conditions) environments. We examined brain neuropeptide and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression, plasma corticosterone concentration rhythm and body temperature rhythm, together with depression- and anxiety-related behaviour. Results showed that LL- and DD-raised mice exhibited decreased GR expression in the hippocampus, increased plasma corticosterone concentration at the onset of the dark phase and a depressive phenotype when exposed to LD cycles later in life. Furthermore, LL-raised mice showed increased corticotrophin-releasing hormone mRNA expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. When exposed to LL as adults, LL-raised mice showed a significant circadian rhythm of plasma corticosterone concentration, together with a shorter period and stronger circadian rhythm of body temperature compared to DD-raised mice. Taken together, these data suggest that altered postnatal light environments have long-term effects on the HPA axis and the circadian system, which can lead to altered stress responses and a depressive phenotype in adulthood. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, AV Hill Building, Oxford Road, M13 9PT, Manchester, UK. maria.canal@manchester.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27591429 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1523  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Colwell, C.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian Rhythms: Does Burning the Midnight Oil Leave You Weak? Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 26 Issue 14 Pages R669-71  
  Keywords Commentary  
  Abstract A new study shows that nocturnal light exposure rapidly disrupts the central circadian clock as well as reduces motor performance and bone health. These findings provide a striking example of the costs of living in a disrupted light/dark cycle.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Semel Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. Electronic address: CColwell@mednet.ucla.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27458911 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1494  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Connelly, S.J.; Stoeckel, J.A.; Gitzen, R.A.; Williamson, C.E.; Gonzalez, M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Clonal Selection on Daphnia Tolerance to Dark Experimental Conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue 7 Pages e0159628  
  Keywords Darkness, Animals  
  Abstract Recent studies have demonstrated substantial effects of environmental stress that vary among clones. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV) is an important abiotic stressor that is highly variable in aquatic ecosystems due to diel and seasonal variations in incident sunlight as well as to differences in the UV transparency of water among water bodies, the depth distribution of organisms, and the ability of organisms to detect and respond to UV. In contrast to the convention that all UV is damaging, evidence is accumulating for the beneficial effects of exposure to low levels of UV radiation. Whereas UV has been frequently observed as the primary light-related stressor, herein we present evidence that dark conditions may be similarly “stressful” (reduction of overall fitness), and stress responses vary among clones of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia parvula. We have identified a significant relationship between survivorship and reduced fecundity of clones maintained in dark conditions, but no correlation between tolerance of the clones to dark and UV radiation. Low tolerance to dark conditions can have negative effects not only on accumulated stresses in organisms (e.g. the repair of UV-induced damage in organisms with photolyase), but potentially on the overall physiology and fitness of organisms. Our results support recent evidence of the beneficial effects of low-level UV exposure for some organisms.  
  Address Department of Biology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27434210 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1491  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Contel, T.M.; Ferrandis, I.G.; Ferrandis, X.G. url  openurl
  Title Light pollution in natural science textbooks in Spanish secondary education Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education Abbreviated Journal Eur. J. Sci. Math. Ed.  
  Volume 4 Issue 2 Pages 129-139  
  Keywords Education; Light pollution, Secondary education, Natural science textbooks, Spanish secondary education curriculum  
  Abstract Light pollution has emerged with the industrial development in recent decades. It is becoming a significant environmental issue for cities today and it will probably become more important in the near future. However, very little research has been carried out on this issue in the field of science teaching, despite there being a general agreement that education has an important contribution to make in the protection of the environment. This research analyses this problem in secondary education, through the official curriculum and textbooks published for the Valencian Region (Spain).  We have based the research on the “Content analysis” method. Light pollution, despite being included in the Spanish compulsory secondary education curriculum, is an issue that is barely touched on in the majority of the first and second year Natural Science textbooks analysed.  
  Address Department of Nursing, Research and Health Care Managemen, Ctatholic University of Valencia “San Vicente Martir”, Valencia, Spain; ignacio.garcia‐ferrandis(at)uv.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2301-251X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1433  
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Author (up) Correa, A.; Barba, A.; Padilla, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light Effects on Behavioural Performance Depend on the Individual State of Vigilance Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue 11 Pages e0164945  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Research has shown that exposure to bright white light or blue-enriched light enhances alertness, but this effect is not consistently observed in tasks demanding high-level cognition (e.g., Sustained Attention to Response Task-SART, which measures inhibitory control). Individual differences in sensitivity to light effects might be mediated by variations in the basal level of arousal. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the participants' behavioural state of vigilance before light exposure, through the Psychomotor Vigilance Task. Then we compared the effects of a blue-enriched vs. dim light at nighttime on the performance of the auditory SART, by controlling for individual differences in basal arousal. The results replicated the alerting effects of blue-enriched light, as indexed by lower values of both proximal temperature and distal-proximal gradient. The main finding was that lighting effects on SART performance were highly variable across individuals and depended on their prior state of vigilance. Specifically, participants with higher levels of basal vigilance before light exposure benefited most from blue-enriched lighting, responding faster in the SART. These results highlight the importance of considering basal vigilance to define the boundary conditions of light effects on cognitive performance. Our study adds to current research delineating the complex and reciprocal interactions between lighting effects, arousal, cognitive task demands and behavioural performance.  
  Address Departamento de Psicologia Experimental. Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27820822 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1554  
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