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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Kurumatani, N.
Title Bedroom Light Exposure at Night and the Incidence of Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study of the HEIJO-KYO Cohort Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal (up) Am J Epidemiol
Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages 427-434
Keywords Human Health; Mental Health; indoor light; geriatrics; Sleep; Sleep Disorders
Abstract Previous studies have indicated that minimal exposure to light at night (LAN) increases depression risk, even at 5 lux, in nocturnal and diurnal mammals. Although such low-level LAN may affect human circadian physiology, the association between exposure to LAN and depressive symptoms remains uncertain. In the present study, bedroom light intensity was measured objectively, and depressive symptoms were assessed, during 2010-2014 in Nara, Japan. Of 863 participants (mean age = 71.5 years) who did not have depressive symptoms at baseline, 73 participants reported development of depressive symptoms during follow-up (median, 24 months). Compared with the “dark” group (average of <5 lux; n = 710), the LAN group (average of >/=5 lux; n = 153) exhibited a significantly higher depression risk (hazard ratio = 1.89; 95% CI: 1.13, 3.14), according to a Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and economic status. Further, the significance remained in a multivariable model adjusting for hypertension, diabetes, and sleep parameters (hazard ratio = 1.72; 95% CI: 1.03, 2.89). Sensitivity analyses using bedroom light data with a cutoff value of >/=10 lux suggested consistent results. In conclusion, these results indicated that exposure to LAN in home settings was independently associated with subsequent depression risk in an elderly general population.
Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, 840 Shijocho, Kashiharashi, Nara 634-8521, Japan; e-mail: obayashi(at)naramed-u.ac.jp
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28992236 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1815
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Author Christie, S.; Vincent, A.D.; Li, H.; Frisby, C.L.; Kentish, S.J.; O'Rielly, R.; Wittert, G.A.; Page, A.J.
Title A rotating light cycle promotes weight gain and hepatic lipid storage in mice Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology Abbreviated Journal (up) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Processes involved in regulation of energy balance and intermediary metabolism are aligned to the light-dark cycle. Shift-work and high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity disrupt circadian rhythmicity and are associated with increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This study aimed to determine the effect of simulating shift work on hepatic lipid accumulation in lean and HFD-mice. C57BL/6 mice fed a standard laboratory diet (SLD) or HFD for 4wks were further allocated to a normal light (NL)-cycle (lights on:0600-1800hr) or rotating light (RL)-cycle (3-days NL and 4-days reversed (lights on:1800-0600hr) repeated) for 8wks. Tissue was collected every 3hrs beginning at 0600hr. HFD-mice gained more weight than SLD-mice, and RL-mice gained more weight than NL-mice. SLD-NL and HFD-NL mice, but not RL-mice, were more active, had higher respiratory quotients and consumed/expended more energy during the dark phase compared to the light phase. Blood glucose and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were elevated in HFD and SLD-RL compared to SLD-NL mice. Hepatic glycogen was elevated in HFD compared to SLD-mice. Hepatic triglycerides were elevated in SLD-RL and HFD-mice compared to SLD-NL. Circadian rhythmicity of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACACA) mRNA was phase shifted in SLD-RL and HFD-NL and lost in HFD-RL mice. Hepatic ACACA protein was reduced in SLD-RL and HFD-mice compared to SLD-NL mice. Hepatic adipose triglyceride lipase was elevated in HFD-NL compared to SLD-NL but lower in RL-mice compared to NL-mice irrespective of diet. -Conclusion: A RL-cycle model of shift-work promotes weight gain and hepatic lipid storage even in lean conditions.
Address Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0193-1857 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30188750 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2123
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Author Navas Gonzalez, F.J.; Jordana Vidal, J.; Pizarro Inostroza, G.; Arando Arbulu, A.; Delgado Bermejo, J.V.
Title Can Donkey Behavior and Cognition Be Used to Trace Back, Explain, or Forecast Moon Cycle and Weather Events? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal (up) Animals (Basel)
Volume 8 Issue 11 Pages
Keywords Moonlight; Animals
Abstract Donkeys have been reported to be highly sensitive to environmental changes. Their 8900-8400-year-old evolution process made them interact with diverse environmental situations that were very distant from their harsh origins. These changing situations not only affect donkeys' short-term behavior but may also determine their long-term cognitive skills from birth. Thus, animal behavior becomes a useful tool to obtain past, present or predict information from the environmental situation of a particular area. We performed an operant conditioning test on 300 donkeys to assess their response type, mood, response intensity, and learning capabilities, while we simultaneously registered 14 categorical environmental factors. We quantified the effect power of such environmental factors on donkey behavior and cognition. We used principal component analysis (CATPCA) to reduce the number of factors affecting each behavioral variable and built categorical regression (CATREG) equations to model for the effects of potential factor combinations. Effect power ranged from 7.9% for the birth season on learning (p < 0.05) to 38.8% for birth moon phase on mood (p < 0.001). CATPCA suggests the percentage of variance explained by a four-dimension-model (comprising the dimensions of response type, mood, response intensity and learning capabilities), is 75.9%. CATREG suggests environmental predictors explain 28.8% of the variability of response type, 37.0% of mood, and 37.5% of response intensity, and learning capabilities.
Address The Worldwide Donkey Breeds Project, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, University of Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba, Spain. juanviagr218@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30463193 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2083
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Author Grubisic, M.; Van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Manfrin, A.; Hölker, F.
Title Insect declines and agroecosystems: does light pollution matter? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Annals of Applied Biology Abbreviated Journal (up) Ann. of Appl. Biol.
Volume 173 Issue 1 Pages 180-189
Keywords Animals; Ecology; Review
Abstract Drastic declines in insect populations, ‘Ecological Armageddon’, have recently gained increased attention in the scientific community, and are commonly considered to be the consequence of large‐scale factors such as land‐use changes, use of pesticides, climate change and habitat fragmentation. Artificial light at night (ALAN), a pervasive global change that strongly impacts insects, remains, however, infrequently recognised as a potential contributor to the observed declines. Here, we provide a summary of recent evidence of impacts of ALAN on insects and discuss how these impacts can drive declines in insect populations in light‐polluted areas. ALAN can increase overall environmental pressure on insect populations, and this is particularly important in agroecosystems where insect communities provide important ecosystem services (such as natural pest control, pollination, conservation of soil structure and fertility and nutrient cycling), and are already under considerable environmental pressure. We discuss how changes in insect populations driven by ALAN and ALAN itself may hinder these services to influence crop production and biodiversity in agricultural landscapes. Understanding the contribution of ALAN and other factors to the decline of insects is an important step towards mitigation and the recovery of the insect fauna in our landscapes. In future studies, the role of increased nocturnal illumination also needs to be examined as a possible causal factor of insect declines in the ongoing ‘Ecological Armageddon’, along with the more commonly examined factors. Given the large scale of agricultural land use and the potential of ALAN to indirectly and directly impact crop production and biodiversity, a better understanding of effects of ALAN in agroecosystems is urgently needed.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1939
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Author Babadi, S.; Ramirez-Inguiez, R.; Boutaleb, T.; Mallick, T.
Title Producing uniform illumination within a rectangular area by using a nonimaging optic Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Applied Optics Abbreviated Journal (up) Appl. Opt.
Volume 57 Issue 31 Pages 9357
Keywords Lighting
Abstract This paper proposes a new design method to create a novel optical element to generate uniform illumination within a rectangular area. Based on this model, an illuminated area is irradiated by two sets of rays; the first one irradiates the target plane after refraction from the top section of the lens, and the second one irradiates from the reflection at the side profile of the lens and then from refraction at the top part of the lens. The results show that a uniformity of over 90% can be achieved.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1559-128X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2046
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