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Author Borck, P.C.; Batista, T.M.; Vettorazzi, J.F.; Soares, G.M.; Lubaczeuski, C.; Guan, D.; Boschero, A.C.; Vieira, E.; Lazar, M.A.; Carneiro, E.M.
Title Nighttime light exposure enhances Rev-erbalpha-targeting microRNAs and contributes to hepatic steatosis Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental Abbreviated Journal Metabolism
Volume 85 Issue Pages 250-258
Keywords Animals
Abstract (up) OBJECTIVE: The exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) disrupts the biological rhythms and has been associated with the development of metabolic syndrome. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) display a critical role in fine-tuning the circadian system and energy metabolism. In this study, we aimed to assess whether altered miRNAs expression in the liver underlies metabolic disorders caused by disrupted biological rhythms. RESULTS: We found that C3H/HePas mice exposed to ALAN developed obesity, and hepatic steatosis, which was paralleled by decreased expression of Rev-erbalpha and up-regulation of its lipogenic targets ACL and FAS in liver. Furthermore, the expression of Rev-erbalpha-targeting miRNAs, miR-140-5p, 185-5p, 326-5p and 328-5p were increased in this group. Consistently, overexpression of these miRNAs in primary hepatocytes reduced Rev-erbalpha expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Importantly, overexpression of Rev-erbalpha-targeting miRNAs increased mRNA levels of Acly and Fasn. CONCLUSION: Thus, altered miRNA profile is an important mechanism underlying the disruption of the peripheral clock caused by exposure to ALAN, which could lead to hepatic steatosis.
Address Obesity and Comorbidities Research Center, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas/UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil; Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas/UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0026-0495 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29751019 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1891
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Author Hall, A.L.; Davies, H.W.; Koehoorn, M.
Title Personal light-at-night exposures and components of variability in two common shift work industries: uses and implications for future research Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Work Environ Health
Volume 44 Issue 1 Pages 80-87
Keywords Human Health
Abstract (up) Objectives Shift workers' increased risk of various adverse health outcomes has been linked to light-at-night (LAN) exposure, but few studies have measured LAN exposure in workplaces. To inform future research methods, this study aimed to (i) measure shift workers' exposures to LAN across industries, occupations, and work environments and (ii) assess components of variance across different exposure groupings and metrics. Methods Between October 2015 and March 2016, 152 personal full-shift measurements were collected from 102 night shift workers in emergency health services (paramedics, dispatchers) and healthcare industries (nurses, care aides, security guards, unit clerks, and laboratory, pharmacy, and respiratory therapy staff) in the province of British Columbia, Canada. Descriptive and variance component analyses were conducted for the 23:00-05:00 period to characterize exposures using multiple metrics of potential biological relevance (median lux, 90 thpercentile lux, sum of minutes >/=30 lux, and sum of minutes >/=100 lux). Results Average exposure levels were highest in the healthcare industry. By occupation, laboratory workers and care aides displayed the highest and emergency dispatch officers displayed the lowest levels for all LAN exposure metrics. Between-group variance was large relative to within-group variance for all exposure groupings and metrics, and increased as grouping specificity increased (moving from industry to occupation). Conclusions Results from this study suggest that high-level grouping schemes may provide a simple yet effective way of characterizing individual LAN exposures in epidemiological studies of shift work. Ongoing measurement of LAN exposures and assessment of exposure variability is needed in future studies of shift workers as a means to increase sampling efficiency, reduce measurement error, and maximize researchers' ability to detect relationships where they exist.
Address School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, V6T1Z3, Canada. amyhall@mail.ubc.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0355-3140 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28951937 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1754
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Author Scheuermaier, K.; Munch, M.; Ronda, J.M.; Duffy, J.F.
Title Improved cognitive morning performance in healthy older adults following blue-enriched light exposure on the previous evening Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res
Volume 348 Issue Pages 267-275
Keywords Human Health
Abstract (up) OBJECTIVES: Exposure to light can have acute alerting and circadian phase-shifting effects. This study investigated the effects of evening exposure to blue-enriched polychromatic white (BEL) vs. polychromatic white light (WL) on sleep inertia dissipation the following morning in older adults. METHODS: Ten healthy older adults (average age=63.3 yrs; 6F) participated in a 13-day study comprising three baseline days, an initial circadian phase assessment, four days with 2-h evening light exposures, a post light exposure circadian phase assessment and three recovery days. Participants were randomized to either BEL or WL of the same irradiance for the four evening light exposures. On the next mornings at 2, 12, 22 and 32min after each wake time, the participants completed a 90-s digit-symbol substitution test (DSST) to assess working memory, and objective alertness was assessed using a wake EEG recording. DSST and power density from the wake EEG recordings were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: DSST performance improved with time awake (p<0.0001) and across study days in both light exposure groups (p<0.0001). There was no main effect of group, although we observed a significant day x group interaction (p=0.0004), whereby participants exposed to BEL performed significantly better on the first two mornings after light exposures than participants in WL (post-hoc, p<0.05). On those days, the BEL group showed higher EEG activity in some of the frequency bins in the sigma and beta range (p<0.05) on the wake EEG. CONCLUSION: Exposure to blue-enriched white light in the evening significantly improved DSST performance the following morning when compared to polychromatic white light. This was associated with a higher level of objective alertness on the wake EEG, but not with changes in sleep or circadian timing.
Address Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29684473 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1899
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Author Taufique, S.T.; Prabhat, A.; Kumar, V.
Title Light at night affects hippocampal and nidopallial cytoarchitecture: Implication for impairment of brain function in diurnal corvids Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals
Abstract (up) Our previous studies have shown that light at night (LAN) impaired cognitive performance and affected neurogenesis and neurochemistry in the cognition-associated brain regions, particularly the hippocampus (HP) and lateral caudal nidopallium (NCL) of Indian house crows (Corvus splendens). Here, we examined the cytoarchitecture and mapped out the morphology of neurons and glia-neuron density in HP and NCL regions of crows that were first entrained to 12-hr light (LL): 12-hr darkness (LD) and then exposed to the light regime in which 12-hr darkness was either replaced by daytime light (i.e., constant light, LL) or by dim light (i.e., dim light at night, dLAN), with controls continued on LD 12:12. Compared with LD, there was a significant decrease in the soma size, suggesting reduced neuronal plasticity without affecting the neuronal density of both HP and NCL of crows under LL and dLAN conditions. In parallel, we found a reduced number of glia cells and, hence, decreased glia-neuron ratio positively correlated with soma size in both, HP and NCL regions. These results for the first time demonstrate LAN-induced negative effects on the brain cytoarchitecture of a diurnal species and give insight for possible influence on the brain health and functions in animals including humans that might be inadvertently exposed to LAN in an emerging night-illuminated urban environment.
Address Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi, India
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30288960 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2022
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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Kurumatani, N.
Title Obayashi et al. Respond to “Light at Night Predicts Depression—What Next?” Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages 439-440
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract (up) Our research includes some strengths and limitations. The most important strength is objective measurement of light at night (LAN) intensity using a bedside light meter. Most previous studies evaluating the association between LAN and health outcomes have assessed indoor LAN levels using a self-reported questionnaire or outdoor LAN levels using satellite data; however, self-reported indoor LAN levels has not yet been validated with objective measurement and outdoor LAN levels are surrogates for an individual LAN exposure. The second strength of our study includes its longitudinal design using multivariable methods to adjust for confounders, which indicated LAN exposure may be a cause of the incidence of depressive symptoms. Indeed, the depressive score evaluated by questionnaires may be above or below the cut-off value over the short term; therefore, a long-term study considering such unstable outcomes should be conducted. In the current study, LAN exposure was measured for only two nights; thus, an amplitude of LAN intensity has been focused. However, multiple measurements over time in the future study would allow an analysis of fluctuations in LAN exposure, which might be important for circadian physiology.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1717
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