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Author Nelson, R.J.; Chbeir, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dark matters: effects of light at night on metabolism Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Nutr Soc  
  Volume 77 Issue 3 Pages 223-229  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract (up) Life on earth has evolved during the past several billion years under relatively bright days and dark night conditions. The wide-spread adoption of electric lights during the past century exposed animals, both human and non-human, to significant light at night for the first time in their evolutionary history. Endogenous circadian clocks depend on light to entrain to the external daily environment and seasonal rhythms depend on clear nightly melatonin signals to assess time of year. Thus, light at night can derange temporal adaptations. Indeed, disruption of naturally evolved light-dark cycles results in several physiological and behavioural changes with potentially serious implications for physiology, behaviour and mood. In this review, data from night-shift workers on their elevated risk for metabolic disorders, as well as data from animal studies will be discussed. Night-shift workers are predisposed to obesity and dysregulated metabolism that may result from disrupted circadian rhythms. Although studies in human subjects are correlative, animal studies have revealed several mechanisms through which light at night may exert its effects on metabolism by disrupting circadian rhythms that are associated with inflammation, both in the brain and in the periphery. Disruption of the typical timing of food intake is a key effect of light at night and subsequent metabolic dysregulation. Strategies to avoid the effects of light at night on body mass dysregulation should be pursued.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience,The Ohio State University,Columbus, OH 43210,USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0029-6651 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29747703 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1896  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Petrova, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Illuminating austerity: Lighting poverty as an agent and signifier of the Greek crisis Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication European Urban and Regional Studies Abbreviated Journal Eur Urban Reg Stud  
  Volume 25 Issue 4 Pages 360-372  
  Keywords Economics; Society  
  Abstract (up) Light – whether natural or artificial – plays multiple roles in the home: both as a material enabler of everyday life and as a device for exercising a variety of social relations. The post-2008 Greek economic crisis has endangered those roles by limiting people's ability to access or afford adequate energy services. This paper focuses on the enforced lack of illumination in the home, and the strategies and tactics undertaken by households to overcome this challenge. I connect illumination practices and discourses to the implementation of austerity, by arguing that the threat of darkness has become a tool for compelling vulnerable groups to pay their electricity bills. The evidence presented in the paper is based on two sets of interviews with 25 households (including a total of 55 adult members) living in and around Thessaloniki – Greece's second largest city, and one that has suffered severe economic consequences as a result of the crisis. I have established that the under-consumption of light is one of the most pronounced expressions of energy poverty, and as such endangers the ability to participate in the customs that define membership of society. But the emergence of activist-led amateur electricians and the symbolic and material mobilization of light for political purposes have also created multiple opportunities for resistance.  
  Address The University of Manchester, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0969-7764 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30369725; PMCID:PMC6187059 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2453  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Emmer, K.M.; Russart, K.L.G.; Walker, W.H.; Nelson, R.J.; DeVries, A.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light at night on laboratory animals and research outcomes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Behav Neurosci  
  Volume 132 Issue 4 Pages 302-314  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract (up) Light has substantial influences on the physiology and behavior of most laboratory animals. As such, lighting conditions within animal rooms are potentially significant and often underappreciated variables within experiments. Disruption of the light/dark cycle, primarily by exposing animals to light at night (LAN), disturbs biological rhythms and has widespread physiological consequences because of mechanisms such as melatonin suppression, sympathetic stimulation, and altered circadian clock gene expression. Thus, attention to the lighting environment of laboratory animals and maintaining consistency of a light/dark cycle is imperative for study reproducibility. Light intensity, as well as wavelength, photoperiod, and timing, are all important variables. Although modern rodent facilities are designed to facilitate appropriate light cycling, there are simple ways to modify rooms to prevent extraneous light exposure during the dark period. Attention to lighting conditions of laboratory animals by both researchers and research care staff ensures best practices for maintaining animal welfare, as well as reproducibility of research results. (PsycINFO Database Record  
  Address Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0735-7044 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29952608 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1957  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ludvigsen, M.; Berge, J.; Geoffroy, M.; Cohen, J.H.; De La Torre, P.R.; Nornes, S.M.; Singh, H.; Sorensen, A.J.; Daase, M.; Johnsen, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Use of an Autonomous Surface Vehicle reveals small-scale diel vertical migrations of zooplankton and susceptibility to light pollution under low solar irradiance Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Sci Adv  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages eaap9887  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract (up) Light is a major cue for nearly all life on Earth. However, most of our knowledge concerning the importance of light is based on organisms' response to light during daytime, including the dusk and dawn phase. When it is dark, light is most often considered as pollution, with increasing appreciation of its negative ecological effects. Using an Autonomous Surface Vehicle fitted with a hyperspectral irradiance sensor and an acoustic profiler, we detected and quantified the behavior of zooplankton in an unpolluted light environment in the high Arctic polar night and compared the results with that from a light-polluted environment close to our research vessels. First, in environments free of light pollution, the zooplankton community is intimately connected to the ambient light regime and performs synchronized diel vertical migrations in the upper 30 m despite the sun never rising above the horizon. Second, the vast majority of the pelagic community exhibits a strong light-escape response in the presence of artificial light, observed down to 100 m. We conclude that artificial light from traditional sampling platforms affects the zooplankton community to a degree where it is impossible to examine its abundance and natural rhythms within the upper 100 m. This study underscores the need to adjust sampling platforms, particularly in dim-light conditions, to capture relevant physical and biological data for ecological studies. It also highlights a previously unchartered susceptibility to light pollution in a region destined to see significant changes in light climate due to a reduced ice cover and an increased anthropogenic activity.  
  Address Centre for Autonomous Operations and Systems, Department of Biology, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29326985; PMCID:PMC5762190 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1806  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Konkal, P.; Ganesh, C.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to low or high light intensity affects pituitary-testicular activity in the fish Oreochromis mossambicus Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture  
  Volume 497 Issue Pages 109-116  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract (up) Light is an important factor for the successful reproduction of most fish. In this investigation, effect of different light intensities on pituitary-testis axis was studied for a period of 21 days, under normal photoperiodic regime in the tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus. The mean numbers of spermatogonia (Sg), primary spermatocytes (Ps), secondary spermatocytes (Ss), early spermatids (Est) and late spermatids (Lst) did not show significant difference between fish exposed to moderate light intensity (MLI) and initial controls or controls, whereas the mean numbers of Sg were significantly lower in fish exposed to low light intensity (LLI) compared to those of initial controls, controls and MLI groups. However, the mean numbers of Ps, Ss, Est and Lst were significantly lower in fish exposed to LLI and high light intensity (HLI) compared to those of other experimental groups. Furthermore, in the pituitary gland, weakly immunoreactive luteinizing hormone (LH) secreting cells were observed in the proximal pars distalis (PPD) region in fish exposed to LLI and HLI in contrast to the intense immunolabelling of these cells in initial controls, controls and MLI groups. The androgen receptors showed diminished immunoreactivity in the Sertoli cells along the seminiferous lobules of the testis in fish exposed to LLI and HLI, whereas the strongly immunoreactive androgen receptors were observed in the Sertoli cells in initial controls, controls and MLI groups. Taken together, these results indicate that long-term exposure to low or high light intensity light suppresses spermatogenetic process and that this inhibition is due to reduced secretory activity of LH cells in the pituitary gland and androgen secretion in the testis of the fish O. mossambicus.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1974  
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