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Author Rowse, E.G.; Harris, S.; Jones, G.
Title Effects of dimming light-emitting diode street lights on light-opportunistic and light-averse bats in suburban habitats Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal R. Soc. open sci.
Volume 5 Issue 6 Pages 180205
Keywords Animals; Lighting
Abstract (up) Emerging lighting technologies provide opportunities for reducing carbon footprints, and for biodiversity conservation. In addition to installing light-emitting diode street lights, many local authorities are also dimming street lights. This might benefit light-averse bat species by creating dark refuges for these bats to forage and commute in human-dominated habitats. We conducted a field experiment to determine how light intensity affects the activity of the light-opportunistic Pipistrellus pipistrellus and light-averse bats in the genus Myotis. We used four lighting levels controlled under a central management system at existing street lights in a suburban environment (0, 25, 50 and 100% of the original output). Higher light intensities (50 and 100% of original output) increased the activity of light-opportunistic species but reduced the activity of light-averse bats. Compared to the unlit treatment, the 25% lighting level did not significantly affect either P. pipistrellus or Myotis spp. Our results suggest that it is possible to achieve a light intensity that provides both economic and ecological benefits by providing sufficient light for human requirements while not deterring light-averse bats.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2054-5703 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1931
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Author Neri, L.; Coscieme, L.; Giannetti, B.F.; Pulselli, F.M.
Title Imputing missing data in non-renewable empower time series from night-time lights observations Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ecological Indicators Abbreviated Journal Ecological Indicators
Volume 84 Issue Pages 106-118
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) Emergy is an environmental accounting tool, with a specific set of indicators, that proved to be highly informative for sustainability assessment of national economies. The empower, defined as emergy per unit time, is a measure of the overall flow of resources used by a system in order to support its functioning. Continuous time-series of empower are not available for most of the world countries, due to the large amount of data needed for its calculation year by year. In this paper, we aim at filling this gap by means of a model that facilitates reconstruction of continuous time series of the non-renewable component of empower for a set of 57 countries of the world from 1995 to 2012. The reconstruction is based on a 3 year global emergy dataset and on the acknowledged relationships between the use of non-renewables, satellite observed artificial lights emitted at night, and Gross Domestic Product. Results show that this method provides accurate estimations of non-renewable empower at the country scale. The estimation model can be extended onward and backward in time and replicated for more countries, also using higher-resolution satellite imageries newly available. Besides representing an important advancement in emergy theory, this information is helpful for monitoring progresses toward Sustainable Development and energy use international goals.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1470160X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1706
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Author Gago-Calderón, A.; Hermoso-Orzáez, M.; De Andres-Diaz, J.; Redrado-Salvatierra, G.
Title Evaluation of Uniformity and Glare Improvement with Low Energy Efficiency Losses in Street Lighting LED Luminaires Using Laser-Sintered Polyamide-Based Diffuse Covers Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Energies Abbreviated Journal Energies
Volume 11 Issue 4 Pages 816
Keywords Lighting
Abstract (up) Energy saving in street lighting is garnering more interest and has become a priority in municipal management. Therefore, LED luminaires are gradually becoming prevalent in our cities. Beyond their energy/economic saving potential, quality in public lighting installations concerns aspects such as uniformity and glare which must be maintained if not improved in any installation renewal project using this technology. The high light intensity generated in a discrete point in LED packages and its directional nature result in significant deficiencies in these last two parameters. To soften these effects, translucent covers are being used as one of the most common solutions with the drawback of significant light intensity losses. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the behavior of LED luminaire’s polyamide-based optical covers manufactured with a laser-sintered process. These are designed to improve glare and uniformity output, to minimize light output reductions, and to be industrially manufactured with no increment of cost for their lighting equipment compared to conventional transparent polycarbonate solutions. A laboratory and field lighting test study has been applied to different covers with the same LED lamp and luminaire to compare the performance of three different solutions built with different polymeric materials and with different light transmission surface textures. The photometric results have been observed and discussed to demonstrate the ability to significantly improve the lighting performance of LED luminaires—illuminance and uniformity levels and discomfort and disability glare indexes— using an improved optic cover.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1996-1073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1844
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Author Boucher, R.; Knefati, S.; Ouimet, C.-A.
Title Conservation du ciel nocturne : surveillance de l’éclairage extérieur et de la pollution lumineuse au parc national et à la Réserve internationale de ciel étoilé du Mont-Mégantic Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Le Naturaliste canadien Abbreviated Journal Le Naturaliste canadien
Volume 142 Issue 3 Pages 88
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract (up) English:

Although seemingly unchanging, today, our ability to see stars on a dark night is in danger of disappearing. The reason for this is the widespread growth of light pollution from inadequate lighting systems. This study, which used a range of methods, presents the results of light pollution measurements taken within the Mont-Mégantic International Dark Sky Reserve (MMIDSR), which was created in 2007 to protect the quality of astronomical observations and research at the Mont-Mégantic Observatory, and to preserve the exceptional starry nightscape visible from the site. Two essential elements of artificial night lighting were considered: its source and its diffusion in the atmosphere. Analyses showed that despite a global trend towards an increase in light levels, population growth on the outskirts of the Parc national du Mont-Mégantic, and the arrival of problematic types of lighting fixtures on the market, the level of light pollution in the MMIDSR has remained stable over the last 10 years, not only at the zenith but across the entire sky.

French:

Pourtant d’apparence immuable, le ciel étoilé est aujourd’hui menacé de disparition. La cause est la croissance généralisée de la pollution lumineuse, résultat de l’utilisation de dispositifs d’éclairage inadéquats. Nous présentons ici les résultats de la mesure de cette pollution obtenue par différentes approches méthodologiques sur le territoire de la Réserve internationale de ciel étoilé du Mont-Mégantic (RICEMM). La RICEMM a été créée en 2007 afin de protéger la qualité des observations astronomiques et de recherche de l’observatoire du mont Mégantic, ainsi que pour conserver les paysages étoilés exceptionnels du site. Deux aspects incontournables de la lumière artificielle nocturne ont été pris en compte : ses sources, ainsi que sa diffusion dans l’atmosphère. Les analyses démontrent que le niveau de pollution lumineuse est resté stable depuis 10 ans dans la RICEMM, tant au zénith que pour l’ensemble du ciel, et ce, malgré une tendance mondiale à la hausse des niveaux d’éclairement, l’augmentation de la population dans la périphérie du parc national du Mont-Mégantic et l’arrivée sur le marché de types de luminaires problématiques.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language French Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0798 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2004
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Author Russart, K.L.G.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Light at night as an environmental endocrine disruptor Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav
Volume 190 Issue Pages 82-89
Keywords Human Health; Animals
Abstract (up) Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are often consequences of human activity; however, the effects of EEDs are not limited to humans. A primary focus over the past approximately 30years has been on chemical EEDs, but the repercussions of non-chemical EEDs, such as artificial light at night (LAN), are of increasing interest. The sensitivity of the circadian system to light and the influence of circadian organization on overall physiology and behavior make the system a target for disruption with widespread effects. Indeed, there is increasing evidence for a role of LAN in human health, including disruption of circadian regulation and melatonin signaling, metabolic dysregulation, cancer risk, and disruption of other hormonally-driven systems. These effects are not limited to humans; domesticated animals as well as wildlife are also exposed to LAN, and at risk for disrupted circadian rhythms. Here, we review data that support the role of LAN as an endocrine disruptor in humans to be considered in treatments and lifestyle suggestions. We also present the effects of LAN in other animals, and discuss the potential for ecosystem-wide effects of artificial LAN. This can inform decisions in agricultural practices and urban lighting decisions to avoid unintended outcomes.
Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28870443 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1719
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