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Author Grubisic, M.; Singer, G.; Bruno, M.C.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Manfrin, A.; Monaghan, M.T.; Hölker, F.
Title A pigment composition analysis reveals community changes in pre-established stream periphyton under low-level artificial light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Limnologica Abbreviated Journal
Volume 69 Issue Pages 55-58
Keywords Plants; Ecology
Abstract (up) Freshwaters are increasingly exposed to artificial light at night (ALAN), yet the consequences for aquatic primary producers remain largely unknown. We used stream-side flumes to expose three-week-old periphyton to LED light. Pigment composition was used to infer community changes in LED-lit and control periphyton before and after three weeks of treatment. The proportion of diatoms/chrysophytes decreased (14%) and cyanobacteria increased (17%) in lit periphyton in spring. This may reduce periphyton nutritional quality in artificially-lit waters.
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ISSN 0075-9511 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1791
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Author Shi, K.; Yu, B.; Huang, C.; Wu, J.; Sun, X.
Title Exploring spatiotemporal patterns of electric power consumption in countries along the Belt and Road Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy
Volume 150 Issue Pages 847-859
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) Fully understanding spatiotemporal patterns of electric power consumption (EPC) is one of the key questions related to sustainable socioeconomic and environmental development in countries along the Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st-Century Maritime Silk Road (hereinafter referred to as the Belt and Road countries). However, studies about spatiotemporal patterns of EPC in the Belt and Road countries are still scarce due to the lack of reliable data. This study attempted to investigate spatiotemporal patterns of EPC in the Belt and Road countries from multiple perspectives. Firstly, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) nighttime stable light data were used to estimate EPC from 1992 to 2013. Subsequently, the mathematical statistic method, standard deviational ellipse, rank size rule, and correlation analysis were employed to evaluate the EPC change in detail. The results reveal that the EPC growth mainly occurs in the developing countries, especially in China. The geographical distribution of EPC in the Belt and Road countries is oriented in the Northwest-Southeast direction between 1992 and 2013. Based on the rank size rule analysis, the slope values of q are −2.392 and −2.175 between 1992 and 2013, with an average R2 value of 0.664, indicating a clear clustering pattern of EPC. It is also proved that GDP is a more important impact factor to EPC than the population. Our findings can offer an effective way to understand spatiotemporal evolution characteristics of EPC in the Belt and Road countries, and provide references for regional socioeconomic development and cooperation.
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ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2487
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Author Amavilah, V.H.
Title Artificial nighttime lights and the “real” well-being of nations : “Measuring economic growth from outer space” and welfare from right here on Earth Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Economics and Political Economy Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 209-218
Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) GDP remains too much of an imprecise measure of the standard of living. There

is a need for either substitutes or complements. Nighttime lights are a reasonable indicator of the extent, scale, and intensity of socio-economic activities, but a poor measure of national welfare. However, if nighttime lights are understood to constitute externalities, then their effects can be used to adjust measured growth for welfare. From that angle, nighttime lights appear to exert sub-optimal positive externalities in developing countries, and supra-optimal negative externality in developed countries. This means that even if we assume equal growth rates in developing and developed countries, welfare is enhanced by increasing nighttime lights in developing countries and reduced by increasing nighttime lights in developed countries.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2099
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Author Cravens, Z.M.; Boyles, J.G.
Title Illuminating the physiological implications of artificial light on an insectivorous bat community Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Oecologia Abbreviated Journal Oecologia
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract (up) Global light pollution threatens to disturb numerous wildlife species, but impacts of artificial light will likely vary among species within a community. Thus, artificial lights may change the environment in such a way as to create winners and losers as some species benefit while others do not. Insectivorous bats are nocturnal and a good model to test for differential effects of light pollution on a single community. We used a physiological technique to address this community-level question by measuring plasma ss-hydroxybutyrate (a blood metabolite) concentrations from six species of insectivorous bats in lit and unlit conditions. We also recorded bat calls acoustically to measure activity levels between experimental conditions. Blood metabolite level and acoustic activity data suggest species-specific changes in foraging around lights. In red bats (Lasiurus borealis), ss-hydroxybutyrate levels at lit sites were highest early in the night before decreasing. Acoustic data indicate pronounced peaks in activity at lit sites early in the night. In red bats on dark nights and in the other species in this community, which seem to avoid lights, ss-hydroxybutyrate remained relatively constant. Our results suggest red bats are more willing to expend energy to actively forage around lights despite potential negative impacts, while other, generally rarer species avoid lit areas. Artificial light appears to have a bifurcating effect on bat communities, whereby some species take advantage of concentrated prey resources, yet most do not. Further, this may concentrate light-intolerant species into limited dark refugia, thereby increasing competition for depauperate, phototactic insect communities.
Address Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL, 62901, USA
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ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:30446844 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2061
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Author Dutta, H.
Title Insights into the impacts of three current environmental problems on Amphibians Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication European Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 4 Issue 2 Pages 15-27
Keywords Animals; Review
Abstract (up) Global warming, light pollution and noise are common human-induced environmental problems that are escalating at a high rate. Their consequences on wildlife have mostly been overlooked, with the exception of a few species with respect to climate change. The problems often occur simultaneously and exert their negative effects together at the same time. In other words, their impacts are combined. Studies have never focused on more than one problem, and so, such combined effects have never been understood properly. The review addresses this lacuna in the case of amphibians, which are a highly vulnerable group. It divides the overall impacts of the problems into seven categories (behaviour, health, movement, distribution, phenology, development and reproductive success) and then assesses their combined impact through statistical analyses. It revealed that amphibian calling is the most vulnerable aspect to the combined impacts. This could provide important input for conservation of amphibians.
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ISSN 1339-8474 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2166
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