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Author Bagan, H.; Borjigin, H.; Yamagata, Y.
Title Assessing nighttime lights for mapping the urban areas of 50 cities across the globe Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science Abbreviated Journal Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science
Volume Issue Pages 2399808317752926
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) Nighttime data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System have been widely used to map urban/built-up areas (hereafter referred to as “built-up area”), but to date there has not been a geographically comprehensive evaluation of the effectiveness of using nighttime lights data to map urban areas. We created accurate, convenient, and scalable grid cells based on Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System nighttime light pixels. We then calculated the density of Landsat-derived built-up areas within each grid cell. We explored the relationship between Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System nighttime lights data and the density of built-up areas to assess the utility of nighttime lights for mapping urban areas in 50 cities across the globe. We found that the brightness of nighttime lights was only in moderate agreement with the density of built-up areas; moreover, correlations between nighttime lights and Landsat-derived built-up areas were weak. Even in relatively sparsely populated urban regions (where the density of the built-up area is less than 20%), the highest correlation coefficient (R2) was only 0.4. Furthermore, nighttime lights showed lighted areas that extended beyond the area of large cities, and nighttime lights reduced the area of small cities. The results suggest that it is difficult to use the regression model to calibrate the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System nighttime lights to fit urban built up areas.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2399-8083 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1795
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Author Ma, W.; Li, P.
Title An Object Similarity-Based Thresholding Method for Urban Area Mapping from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day/Night Band (VIIRS DNB) Data Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 263
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) Nighttime light data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) provides a unique data source for mapping and monitoring urban areas at regional and global scales. This study proposes an object similarity-based thresholding method using VIIRS DNB data to map urban areas. The threshold for a target potential urban object was determined by comparing its similarity with all reference urban objects with known optimal thresholds derived from Landsat data. The proposed method includes four major steps: potential urban object generation, threshold optimization for reference urban objects, object similarity comparison, and urban area mapping. The proposed method was evaluated using VIIRS DNB data of China and compared with existing mapping methods in terms of threshold estimation and urban area mapping. The results indicated that the proposed method estimated thresholds and mapped urban areas accurately and generally performed better than the cluster-based logistic regression method. The correlation coefficients between the estimated thresholds and the reference thresholds were 0.9201–0.9409 (using Euclidean distance as similarity measure) and 0.9461–0.9523 (using Mahalanobis distance as similarity measure) for the proposed method and 0.9435–0.9503 for the logistic regression method. The average Kappa Coefficients of the urban area maps were 0.58 (Euclidean distance) and 0.57 (Mahalanobis distance) for the proposed method and 0.51 for the logistic regression method. The proposed method shows potential to map urban areas at a regional scale effectively in an economic and convenient way.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2341
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Author Alaasam, V.J.; Duncan, R.; Casagrande, S.; Davies, S.; Sidher, A.; Seymoure, B.; Shen, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Ouyang, J.Q.
Title Light at night disrupts nocturnal rest and elevates glucocorticoids at cool color temperatures Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 465-472
Keywords Animals
Abstract (up) Nighttime light pollution is quickly becoming a pervasive, global concern. Since the invention and proliferation of light-emitting diodes (LED), it has become common for consumers to select from a range of color temperatures of light with varying spectra. Yet, the biological impacts of these different spectra on organisms remain unclear. We tested if nighttime illumination of LEDs, at two commercially available color temperatures (3000 and 5000 K) and at ecologically relevant illumination levels affected body condition, food intake, locomotor activity, and glucocorticoid levels in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). We found that individuals exposed to 5000 K light had higher rates of nighttime activity (peaking after 1 week of treatment) compared to 3000 K light and controls (no nighttime light). Birds in the 5000 K treatment group also had increased corticosterone levels from pretreatment levels compared to 3000 K and control groups but no changes in body condition or food intake. Individuals that were active during the night did not consequently decrease daytime activity. This study adds to the growing evidence that the spectrum of artificial light at night is important, and we advocate the use of nighttime lighting with warmer color temperatures of 3000 K instead of 5000 K to decrease energetic costs for avian taxa.
Address Department of Biology, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29766666 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1909
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Author Zhao, N.; Cao, G.; Zhang, W.; Samson, E.L.
Title Tweets or nighttime lights: Comparison for preeminence in estimating socioeconomic factors Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing
Volume 146 Issue Pages 1-10
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) Nighttime lights (NTL) imagery is one of the most commonly used tools to quantitatively study socioeconomic systems over large areas. In this study we aim to use location-based social media big data to challenge the primacy of NTL imagery on estimating socioeconomic factors. Geo-tagged tweets posted in the contiguous United States in 2013 were retrieved to produce a tweet image with the same spatial resolution of the NTL imagery (i.e., 0.00833° × 0.00833°). Sum tweet (the total number of tweets) and sum light (summed DN value of the NTL image) of each state or county were obtained from the tweets and the NTL images, respectively, to estimate three important socioeconomic factors: personal income, electric power consumption, and fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions. Results show that sum tweet is a better measure of personal income and electric power consumption while carbon dioxide emissions can be more accurately estimated by sum light. We further exploited that African-Americans adults are more likely than White seniors to post geotagged tweets in the US, yet did not find any significant correlations between proportions of the subpopulations and the estimation accuracy of the socioeconomic factors. Existence of saturated pixels and blooming effects and failure to remove gas flaring reduce quality of NTL imagery in estimating socioeconomic factors, however, such problems are nonexistent in the tweet images. This study reveals that the number of geo-tagged tweets has great potential to be deemed as a substitute of brightness of NTL to assess socioeconomic factors over large geographic areas.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0924-2716 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1994
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Author Kong, Y.; Stasiak, M.; Dixon, M.A.; Zheng, Y.
Title Blue light associated with low phytochrome activity can promote elongation growth as shade-avoidance response: A comparison with red light in four bedding plant species Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Environmental and Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal Environmental and Experimental Botany
Volume 155 Issue Pages 345-359
Keywords Plants
Abstract (up) o explore the action mode of blue light on elongation growth of bedding plants, the plant growth and morphology traits of petunia (Petunia × hybrida, ‘Duvet Red’), calibrachoa (Calibrachoa × hybrida, ‘Kabloom Deep Blue’), geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum, ‘Pinto Premium Salmon’), and marigold (Tagetes erecta, ‘Antigua Orange’) were compared under four light quality treatments: (1) R, “pure” red light (660 nm); (2) B, “pure” blue light (450 nm); (3) BR, “unpure” blue light created by mixing B with a low level of R to provide B/R ≈ 9; (4) BRF, “unpure” blue light created by adding a low level of far red light to BR with red/far red ≈ 1. Continuous (24-h) light-emitting diode lighting with either 100 or 50 μmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetic photon flux density at ≈ 23℃ was used with the above treatments. After 14–20 day of lighting treatment, B promoted elongation growth compared to R, as demonstrated by a greater canopy height, main stem length, internode length, and daily main stem extension rate. However, BR showed similar or inhibitory effects on these traits relative to R, while BRF exhibited similar promotion effects as B. The calculated phytochrome photoequilibrium, an indication of phytochrome activity, was higher for R (0.89) and BR (0.74) than for B (0.49) and BRF (0.63). Adding red (or far red) light reversed the effects of B (or BR) on elongation growth and the phytochrome photoequilibrium, suggesting that blue light promotion of elongation growth is related to the lower phytochrome activity. Also, B and BRF, when compared to R or BR, promoted elongation growth to a greater degree at 50 than 100 μmol m−2 s−1 for petunia and calibrachoa. In addition to the promoted elongation growth, B and BRF reduced side branch number, biomass allocation to side branches, leaf epinasty, leaf angle, and/or leaf chlorophyll content relative to R or BR, but increased individual leaf area, petiole length, and/or biomass allocation to main stem, which varied with different species. It suggests that the promoted elongation growth by blue light associated with lower phytochrome activity is one of shade-avoidance responses with varying sensitivity among species.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0098-8472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1973
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