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Author Kyba, C.C.M.
Title Is light pollution getting better or worse? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Astronomy Abbreviated Journal Nat Astron
Volume 2 Issue 4 Pages 267-269
Keywords Skyglow; Commentary
Abstract (up) Awareness of light pollution is spreading, but with changing lighting technologies, emissions are shifting to wavelengths our current measuring devices cannot assess well. Community involvement is essential to evaluate changes in sky brightness.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2397-3366 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1870
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Author Min, J.-young; Min, K.-bok
Title Outdoor light at night and the prevalence of depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors: a cross-sectional study in a nationally representative sample of Korean adults Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Affective Disorders Abbreviated Journal Journal of Affective Disorders
Volume 227 Issue Pages 199-205
Keywords Human Health
Abstract (up) Background

Outdoor light at night (LAN) is an increasingly prevalent type of environmental pollution. Studies have demonstrated that outdoor LAN can disrupt circadian rhythms, potentially contributing to insomnia, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic changes in humans. We investigated the association of outdoor LAN with depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors in South Korean adults.

Methods

This study used data from the 2009 Korean Community Health Survey, a representative sample dataset. Study population consisted of 113,119 participants for the assessment of depressive symptoms and 152,159 participants for the assessment of suicidal behavior. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Korean version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (depressive symptoms, score of > 16). Suicidal behaviors were defined as the experience of suicidal ideation or attempt. Outdoor LAN was estimated by satellite data from the National Centers for Environmental Information.

Results

Participants with depressive symptoms or history of suicidal behaviors were more likely to have exposure to outdoor LAN than those without depressive symptoms or suicidal behaviors. Compared with adults living in areas exposed to the lowest outdoor LAN, those living in areas exposed to the highest levels had higher likelihood depressive symptoms (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.15–1.46) or suicidal behaviors (OR = 1.27; 95% CI: 1.16–1.39). Significant dose-response relationships were observed between outdoor LAN and the odds of depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors.

Conclusion

Outdoor LAN was found to be significantly associated with depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors, suggesting that it may be an environmental contributor to mental health problems.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0165-0327 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1777
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Author Suh, Y.-W.; Na, K.-H.; Ahn, S.-E.; Oh, J.
Title Effect of Ambient Light Exposure on Ocular Fatigue during Sleep Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Korean Medical Science Abbreviated Journal J Korean Med Sci
Volume 33 Issue 38 Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract (up) Background

To investigate the influence of nocturnal ambient light on visual function and ocular fatigue.

Methods

Sixty healthy subjects (30 males and 30 females) aged 19 through 29 years with no history of ocular disease were recruited. All subjects spent 3 consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. During the first and second nights, the subjects were not exposed to light during sleep, but during the third night, they were exposed to ambient light, measuring 5 or 10 lux at the eye level, which was randomly allocated with 30 subjects each. The visual function and ocular fatigue were assessed at 7 a.m. on the 3rd and 4th mornings, using best-corrected visual acuity, refractive error, conjunctival hyperemia, tear break-up time, maximal blinking interval, ocular surface temperature, and subjective symptoms reported on a questionnaire.

Results

Three male and three female subjects failed to complete the study (4 in the 5 lux; 2 from the 10 lux). For the entire 54 subjects, tear break-up time and maximal blinking interval decreased (P = 0.015; 0.010, respectively), and nasal and temporal conjunctival hyperemia increased significantly after sleep under any ambient light (P < 0.001; 0.021, respectively). Eye tiredness and soreness also increased (P = 0.004; 0.024, respectively). After sleep under 5 lux light, only nasal conjunctival hyperemia increased significantly (P = 0.008). After sleep under 10 lux light, nasal and temporal conjunctival hyperemia, eye tiredness, soreness, difficulty in focusing, and ocular discomfort increased significantly (P < 0.05).

Conclusion

Nocturnal ambient light exposure increases ocular fatigue. Avoiding ambient light during sleep could be recommended to prevent ocular fatigue.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1011-8934 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1991
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Author Kozaki, T.; Hidaka, Y.; Takakura, J.-Y.; Kusano, Y.
Title Suppression of salivary melatonin secretion under 100-Hz flickering and non-flickering blue light Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Physiological Anthropology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol Anthropol
Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages 23
Keywords Human Health
Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Bright light at night is known to suppress melatonin secretion. Novel photoreceptors named intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are mainly responsible for projecting dark/bright information to the suprachiasmatic nucleus and thus regulating the circadian system. However, it has been shown that the amplitude of the electroretinogram of ipRGCs is considerably lower under flickering light at 100 Hz than at 1-5 Hz, suggesting that flickering light may also affect the circadian system. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated light-induced melatonin suppression under flickering and non-flickering light. METHODS: Twelve male participants between the ages of 20 and 23 years (mean +/- S.D. = 21.6 +/- 1.5 years) were exposed to three light conditions (dim, 100-Hz flickering, and non-flickering blue light) from 1:00 A.M. to 2:30 A.M., and saliva samples were obtained just before 1:00 A.M. and at 1:15, 1:30, 2:00, and 2:30 A.M. RESULTS: A repeated measures t test with Bonferroni correction showed that at 1:15 A.M., melatonin concentrations were significantly lower following exposure to non-flickering light compared with dim light, whereas there was no significant difference between the dim and 100-Hz flickering light conditions. By contrast, after 1:30 A.M., the mean melatonin concentrations were significantly lower under both 100-Hz flickering and non-flickering light than under dim light. CONCLUSION: Although melatonin suppression rate tended to be lower under 100-Hz flickering light than under non-flickering light at the initial 15 min of the light exposure, the present study suggests that 100-Hz flickering light may have the same impact on melatonin secretion as non-flickering light.
Address Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences, Nishikyushu University, Kanzaki, Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1880-6791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30340620 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2039
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Author Johns, L.E.; Jones, M.E.; Schoemaker, M.J.; McFadden, E.; Ashworth, A.; Swerdlow, A.J.
Title Domestic light at night and breast cancer risk: a prospective analysis of 105 000 UK women in the Generations Study Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer
Volume 118 Issue Pages 600-606
Keywords Human Health
Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Circadian disruption caused by exposure to light at night (LAN) has been proposed as a risk factor for breast cancer and a reason for secular increases in incidence. Studies to date have largely been ecological or case-control in design and findings have been mixed. METHODS: We investigated the relationship between LAN and breast cancer risk in the UK Generations Study. Bedroom light levels and sleeping patterns at age 20 and at study recruitment were obtained by questionnaire. Analyses were conducted on 105 866 participants with no prior history of breast cancer. During an average of 6.1 years of follow-up, 1775 cases of breast cancer were diagnosed. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs), adjusting for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: There was no association between LAN level and breast cancer risk overall (highest compared with lowest LAN level at recruitment: HR=1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88-1.15), or for invasive (HR=0.98, 95% CI: 0.85-1.13) or in situ (HR=0.96, 95% CI: 0.83-1.11) breast cancer, or oestrogen-receptor (ER) positive (HR=0.98, 95% CI: 0.84-1.14); or negative (HR=1.16, 95% CI: 0.82-1.65) tumours separately. The findings did not differ by menopausal status. Adjusting for sleep duration, sleeping at unusual times (non-peak sleep) and history of night work did not affect the results. Night waking with exposure to light, occurring around age 20, was associated with a reduced risk of premenopausal breast cancer (HR for breast cancer overall=0.74, 95% CI: 0.55-0.99; HR for ER-positive breast cancer=0.69, 95% CI: 0.49-0.97). CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective cohort analysis of LAN, there was no evidence that LAN exposure increased the risk of subsequent breast cancer, although the suggestion of a lower breast cancer risk in pre-menopausal women with a history of night waking in their twenties may warrant further investigation.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 23 January 2018; doi:10.1038/bjc.2017.359 www.bjcancer.com.
Address Division of Breast Cancer Research, The Institute of Cancer Research, London SW3 6JB, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29360812 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1803
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