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Author Russart, K.L.G.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night as an environmental endocrine disruptor Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 190 Issue Pages 82-89  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals  
  Abstract (up) Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are often consequences of human activity; however, the effects of EEDs are not limited to humans. A primary focus over the past approximately 30years has been on chemical EEDs, but the repercussions of non-chemical EEDs, such as artificial light at night (LAN), are of increasing interest. The sensitivity of the circadian system to light and the influence of circadian organization on overall physiology and behavior make the system a target for disruption with widespread effects. Indeed, there is increasing evidence for a role of LAN in human health, including disruption of circadian regulation and melatonin signaling, metabolic dysregulation, cancer risk, and disruption of other hormonally-driven systems. These effects are not limited to humans; domesticated animals as well as wildlife are also exposed to LAN, and at risk for disrupted circadian rhythms. Here, we review data that support the role of LAN as an endocrine disruptor in humans to be considered in treatments and lifestyle suggestions. We also present the effects of LAN in other animals, and discuss the potential for ecosystem-wide effects of artificial LAN. This can inform decisions in agricultural practices and urban lighting decisions to avoid unintended outcomes.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28870443 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1719  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fu, D.; Xia, X.; Duan, M.; Zhang, X.; Li, X.; Wang, J.; Liu, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping nighttime PM 2.5 from VIIRS DNB using a linear mixed-effect model Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Atmospheric Environment Abbreviated Journal Atmospheric Environment  
  Volume 178 Issue Pages 214-222  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract (up) Estimation of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) from daytime satellite aerosol products is widely reported in the literature; however, remote sensing of nighttime surface PM2.5 from space is very limited. PM2.5 shows a distinct diurnal cycle and PM2.5 concentration at 1:00 local standard time (LST) has a linear correlation coefficient (R) of 0.80 with daily-mean PM2.5. Therefore, estimation of nighttime PM2.5 is required toward an improved understanding of temporal variation of PM2.5 and its effects on air quality. Using data from the Day/Night Band (DNB) of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) and hourly PM2.5 data at 35 stations in Beijing, a mixed-effect model is developed here to estimate nighttime PM2.5 from nighttime light radiance measurements based on the assumption that the DNB-PM2.5 relationship is constant spatially but varies temporally. Cross-validation showed that the model developed using all stations predict daily PM2.5 with mean determination coefficient (R2) of 0.87 ±± 0.12, 0.83 ±0.10±0.10, 0.87 ±± 0.09, 0.83 ±± 0.10 in spring, summer, autumn and winter. Further analysis showed that the best model performance was achieved in urban stations with average cross-validation R2 of 0.92. In rural stations, DNB light signal is weak and was likely smeared by lunar illuminance that resulted in relatively poor estimation of PM2.5. The fixed and random parameters of the mixed-effect model in urban stations differed from those in suburban stations, which indicated that the assumption of the mixed-effect model should be carefully evaluated when used at a regional scale.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1352-2310 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1814  
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Author Beyer, R., Chhabra, E., Galdo, V., & Rama M. url  openurl
  Title Measuring Districts’ Monthly Economic Activity from Outer Space Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The World Bank Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract (up) Evening-hour luminosity observed using satellites is a good proxy for economic activity. The strengths of measuring economic activity using nightlight measurements include that the data capture informal activity, are available in near real-time, are cheap to obtain, and can be used to conduct very spatially granular analysis. This paper presents a measure of monthly economic activity at the district level based on cleaned Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite nightlight and rural population. The paper demonstrates that this new method can shed light on recent episodes in South Asia: first, the 2015 earthquake in Nepal; second, demonetization in India; and, third, violent conflict outbreaks in Afghanistan.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2965  
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Author Robertson, B.A., Horváth, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Color polarization vision mediates the strength of an evolutionary trap Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Wiley Evolutionary Applications Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume In press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract (up) Evolutionary traps are scenarios in which animals are fooled by rapidly changing conditions into preferring poor-quality resources over those that better improve survival and reproductive success. The maladaptive attraction of aquatic insects to artificial sources of horizontally polarized light (e.g., glass buildings, asphalt roads) has become a first model system by which scientists can investigate the behavioral mechanisms that cause traps to occur. We employ this field-based system to experimentally investigate (a) in which portion(s) of the spectrum are polarizationally water-imitating reflectors attractive to nocturnal terrestrial and aquatics insects, and (b) which modern lamp types result in greater attraction in this typical kind of nocturnal polarized light pollution. We found that most aquatic taxa exhibited preferences for lamps based upon their color spectra, most having lowest preference for lamps emitting blue and red light. Yet, despite previously established preference for higher degrees of polarization of reflected light, most aquatic insect families were attracted to traps based upon their unpolarized spectrum. Chironomid midges, alone, showed a preference for the color of lamplight in both the horizontally polarized and unpolarized spectra indicating only this family has evolved to use light in this color range as a source of information to guide its nocturnal habitat selection. These results demonstrate that the color of artificial lighting can exacerbate or reduce its attractiveness to aquatic insects, but that the strength of attractiveness of nocturnal evolutionary traps, and so their demographic consequences, is primarily driven by unpolarized light pollution. This focuses management attention on limiting broad-spectrum light pollution, as well as its intentional deployment to attract insects back to natural habitats.  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2076  
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Author Hansen, M.J.; Cocherell, D.E.; Cooke, S.J.; Patrick, P.H.; Sills, M.; Fangue, N.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Behavioural guidance of Chinook salmon smolts: the variable effects of LED spectral wavelength and strobing frequency Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Conservation Physiology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract (up) Exploiting species-specific behavioural responses of fish to light is an increasingly promising technique to reduce the entrainment or impingement of fish that results from the diversion of water for human activities, such as hydropower or irrigation. Whilst there is some evidence that white light can be an effective deterrent for Chinook salmon smolts, the results have been mixed. There is a need to test the response of fish to different spectra and strobing frequencies to improve deterrent performance. We tested the movement and spatial response of groups of four fish to combinations of light-emitting diode (LED) spectra (red, green, blue and white light) during the day and night, and strobing frequencies (constant and 2Hz) during the day, using innovative LED technology intended as a behavioural guidance device for use in the field. Whilst strobing did not alter fish behaviour when compared to constant light, the red light had a repulsive effect during the day, with fish under this treatment spending significantly less time in the half of the arena closest to the behavioural guidance device compared to both the control and blue light. Importantly, this effect disappeared at night, where there were no differences in movement and space use found between spectra. There was some evidence of a potential attractive response of fish to the blue and green light during the day. Under these light treatments, fish spent the highest amount of time closest to the behavioural guidance device. Further tests manipulating the light intensity in the different spectra are needed to verify the mechanistic determinants of the observed behaviours. Results are discussed in reference to the known spectral sensitivities of the cone and rod photopigments in these fish, and further experiments are suggested to better relate the work to mitigating the effects on fish of infrastructure used for hydropower and irrigation.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2051-1434 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1947  
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