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Author Hüppop, O.; Ciach, M.; Diehl, R.; Reynolds, D.R.; Stepanian, P.M.; Menz, M.H.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Perspectives and challenges for the use of radar in biological conservation Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ecography Abbreviated Journal Ecography  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Review  
  Abstract (up) Radar is at the forefront for the study of broad‐scale aerial movements of birds, bats and insects and related issues in biological conservation. Radar techniques are especially useful for investigating species which fly at high altitudes, in darkness, or which are too small for applying electronic tags. Here, we present an overview of radar applications in biological conservation and highlight its future possibilities. Depending on the type of radar, information can be gathered on local‐ to continental‐scale movements of airborne organisms and their behaviour. Such data can quantify flyway usage, biomass and nutrient transport (bioflow), population sizes, dynamics and distributions, times and dimensions of movements, areas and times of mass emergence and swarming, habitat use and activity ranges. Radar also captures behavioural responses to anthropogenic disturbances, artificial light and man‐made structures. Weather surveillance and other long‐range radar networks allow spatially broad overviews of important stopover areas, songbird mass roosts and emergences from bat caves. Mobile radars, including repurposed marine radars and commercially dedicated ‘bird radars’, offer the ability to track and monitor the local movements of individuals or groups of flying animals. Harmonic radar techniques have been used for tracking short‐range movements of insects and other small animals of conservation interest. However, a major challenge in aeroecology is determining the taxonomic identity of the targets, which often requires ancillary data obtained from other methods. Radar data have become a global source of information on ecosystem structure, composition, services and function and will play an increasing role in the monitoring and conservation of flying animals and threatened habitats worldwide.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2204  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gaynor, K.M.; Hojnowski, C.E.; Carter, N.H.; Brashares, J.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The influence of human disturbance on wildlife nocturnality Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 360 Issue 6394 Pages 1232-1235  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Rapid expansion of human activity has driven well-documented shifts in the spatial distribution of wildlife, but the cumulative effect of human disturbance on the temporal dynamics of animals has not been quantified. We examined anthropogenic effects on mammal diel activity patterns, conducting a meta-analysis of 76 studies of 62 species from six continents. Our global study revealed a strong effect of humans on daily patterns of wildlife activity. Animals increased their nocturnality by an average factor of 1.36 in response to human disturbance. This finding was consistent across continents, habitats, taxa, and human activities. As the global human footprint expands, temporal avoidance of humans may facilitate human-wildlife coexistence. However, such responses can result in marked shifts away from natural patterns of activity, with consequences for fitness, population persistence, community interactions, and evolution.  
  Address Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher AAAS Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29903973 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1988  
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Author Farkas, T.D.; Kiràly, T.; Pardy, T.; Rang, T.; Rang, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Application of power line communication technology in street lighting control Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Design & Nature and Ecodynamics Abbreviated Journal Int. J. DNE  
  Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 176-186  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract (up) Rapidly increasing usage of telecommunication systems causes new transmission technologies and networks to emerge. Not only the efficiency, reliability and accessibility of the network are important, but also the economic issues. One cost-effective solution could be power line communication (PLC) technology, which transmits data using the existing electricity infrastructure. The application of this communication technique is an attractive and innovative solution for the realization of smart cities and smart homes. With intelligent control networks, energy savings can be optimized and the operating as well as maintenance costs can be reduced. Since outdoor lighting systems are the major consumers of electricity, to create a modern, energy-efficient city, intelligent street lighting control is needed. This paper provides an overview of power line communication principles including the theoretical background of data communication, modulation techniques, channel access methods, protocols, disturbances and noises. Furthermore, in order to highlight the benefits of a PLC-based street lighting control system, a pilot project will be presented.  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1755-7437 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2091  
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Author McGlashan, E.M.; Nandam, L.S.; Vidafar, P.; Mansfield, D.R.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Cain, S.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The SSRI citalopram increases the sensitivity of the human circadian system to light in an acute dose Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Psychopharmacology Abbreviated Journal Psychopharmacology (Berl)  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract (up) RATIONALE: Disturbances of the circadian system are common in depression. Though they typically subside when depression is treated with antidepressants, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Despite being the most commonly prescribed class of antidepressants, the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on the human circadian clock is not well understood. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of the SSRI citalopram (30 mg) on the sensitivity of the human circadian system to light. METHODS: This study used a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects, crossover design. Participants completed two melatonin suppression assessments in room level light (~ 100 lx), taking either a single dose of citalopram 30 mg or a placebo at the beginning of each light exposure. Melatonin suppression was calculated by comparing placebo and citalopram light exposure conditions to a dim light baseline. RESULTS: A 47% increase in melatonin suppression was observed after administration of an acute dose of citalopram, with all participants showing more suppression after citalopram administration (large effect, d = 1.54). Further, melatonin onset occurred later under normal room light with citalopram compared to placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Increased sensitivity of the circadian system to light could assist in explaining some of the inter-individual variability in antidepressant treatment responses, as it is likely to assist in recovery in some patients, while causing further disruption for others.  
  Address Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, 18 Innovation Walk, Clayton, VIC, 3800, Australia. sean.cain@monash.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-3158 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30219986 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2012  
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Author Cai, W.; Yue, J.; Dai, Q.; Hao, L.; Lin, Y.; Shi, W.; Huang, Y.; Wei, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of room surface reflectance on corneal illuminance and rule-of-thumb equations for circadian lighting design Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment  
  Volume 141 Issue Pages 288-297  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract (up) Recently, corneal illuminance attracts much attention because it is closely related to important functions of indoor lighting. Especially, applying circadian light in the built environment places a challenging requirement on indirect corneal illuminance. In this work, rule-of-thumb equations are proposed to guide circadian lighting design: (i) for artificial lighting, Ecor,avg (i) = (Φ/C1) · ρ/(1−ρ′), where Ecor,avg (i) is the average indirect corneal illuminance at standing or sitting positions, Φ is the initial flux from luminaires, C1 is a constant comparable to the total room surface area, ρ is the reflectance of the surface where the first reflection occurs, and ρ′ is the area-weighted average of surface reflectance; and (ii) for daylighting, Ecor,avg (i) = C2 · WWR · ρ/(1−ρ′), where C2 is a constant, and WWR represents the window-to-wall ratio.

The equations above are validated by comparing against numerical simulation data obtained with the Radiance software. For artificial lighting simulation, various combinations of room surface reflectance, initial light distribution, and WWR are investigated; and for daylighting simulation, different combinations of surface reflectance, WWR, and geographic location are analyzed. The good fits to simulation data indicate that the proposed simple equations can provide reasonably accurate results for quick feedback at the field. It is also demonstrated that room surface reflectance has a dominant impact on indirect corneal illuminance. The approach of improving surface reflectance is more favorable than increasing luminaire flux or expanding window area, and therefore should be the recommended approach to achieve quality and efficient circadian lighting.
 
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1929  
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