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Author Mortazavi, S.A.R., Parhoodeh, S., Hosseini, M.A., Arabi, H., Malakooti, H., Nematollahi, S., Mortazavi, G., Darvish, L., Mortazavi, S.M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blocking Short-Wavelength Component of the Visible Light Emitted by Smartphones’ Screens Improves Human Sleep Quality Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biomedical Physics and Engineering Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue 4 Pages 375-380  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract (up) Background: It has been shown that short-wavelength blue component of the visible light spectrum can alter the circadian rhythm and suppress the level of melatonin hormone. The short-wavelength light emitted by smartphones’ screens can affect the sleep quality of the people who use these devices at night through suppression of melatonin.

Objectives: In this study, we examined the effects of covering the screens of smartphones with different filters (changing the effective wavelength of the light) on sleep delay time in 43 healthy students.

Materials and Methods: Volunteer students were asked to go to bed at 23:00 and to use their mobile phones in bed for watching a natural life documentary movie for 60 minutes. No filter was used for one night while amber and blue filters were used for other 2 nights. Photospectrometry method was used to determine the output spectrum of the light passing through the filters used for covering the screens of the mobile phones. The order for utilizing amber or blue filters or using no filter was selected randomly. After 1 hour, the participants were asked to record their sleep delay time measured by a modified form of sleep time record sheet.

Results: The mean sleep delay time for the “no-filter” night was 20.84±9.15 minutes, while the sleep delay times for the nights with amber and blue filters were 15.26±1.04 and 26.33±1.59 minutes, respectively.

Conclusion: The findings obtained in this study support this hypothesis that blue light possibly suppresses the secretion of melatonin more than the longer wavelengths of the visible light spectrum. Using amber filter in this study significantly improved the sleep quality. Altogether, these findings lead us to this conclusion that blocking the short-wavelength component of the light emitted by smartphones’ screens improves human sleep.
 
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  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2077  
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Author Lee, S.; Kakitsuba, N.; Katsuura, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Do green-blocking glasses enhance the nonvisual effects of white polychromatic light? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Physiological Anthropology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol Anthropol  
  Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages 29  
  Keywords Human Health; Vision  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: It is well known that light containing the blue component stimulates the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) and plays a role in melatonin suppression and pupillary constriction. In our previous studies, we verified that simultaneous exposure to blue and green light resulted in less pupillary constriction than blue light exposure. Hence, we hypothesized that the nonvisual effects of polychromatic white light might be increased by blocking the green component. Therefore, we conducted an experiment using optical filters that blocked blue or green component and examined the nonvisual effects of these lights on pupillary constriction and electroencephalogram power spectra. METHODS: Ten healthy young males participated in this study. The participant sat on a chair with his eyes facing an integrating sphere. After 10 min of light adaptation, the participant's left eye was exposed to white pulsed light (1000 lx; pulse width 2.5 ms) every 10 s with a blue-blocking glasses, a green-blocking glasses, or control glasses (no lens), and pupillary constriction was measured. Then, after rest for 10 min, the participant was exposed a continuous white light of 1000 lx with a blue- or green-blocking glasses or control glasses and electroencephalogram was measured. RESULTS: Pupillary constriction with the blue-blocking glasses was significantly less than that observed with the green-blocking glasses. Furthermore, pupillary constriction under the green-blocking glasses was significantly greater than that observed with the control glasses. CONCLUSIONS: A reduction in the green component of light facilitated pupillary constriction. Thus, the effects of polychromatic white light containing blue and green components on ipRGCs are apparently increased by removing the green component.  
  Address Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1880-6791 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30563575; PMCID:PMC6299521 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2153  
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Author Garcia-Saenz, A.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Espinosa, A.; Valentin, A.; Aragonés, N.; Llorca, J.; Amiano, P.; Martín Sánchez, V.; Guevara, M.; Capelo, R.; Tardón, A.; Peiró-Perez, R.; Jiménez-Moleón, J.J.; Roca-Barceló, A.; Pérez-Gómez, B.; Dierssen-Sotos, T.; Fernández-Villa, T.; Moreno-Iribas, C.; Moreno, V.; García-Pérez, J.; Castaño-Vinyals, G.; Pollán, M.; Aubé, M.; Kogevinas, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluating the Association between Artificial Light-at-Night Exposure and Breast and Prostate Cancer Risk in Spain (MCC-Spain Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 126 Issue 04 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract (up) Background: Night shift work, exposure to light at night (ALAN) and circadian disruption may increase the risk of hormone-dependent cancers.

Objectives: We evaluated the association of exposure to ALAN during sleeping time with breast and prostate cancer in a population based multicase–control study (MCC-Spain), among subjects who had never worked at night. We evaluated chronotype, a characteristic that may relate to adaptation to light at night.

Methods: We enrolled 1,219 breast cancer cases, 1,385 female controls, 623 prostate cancer cases, and 879 male controls from 11 Spanish regions in 2008–2013. Indoor ALAN information was obtained through questionnaires. Outdoor ALAN was analyzed using images from the International Space Station (ISS) available for Barcelona and Madrid for 2012–2013, including data of remotely sensed upward light intensity and blue light spectrum information for each geocoded longest residence of each MCC-Spain subject.

Results: Among Barcelona and Madrid participants with information on both indoor and outdoor ALAN, exposure to outdoor ALAN in the blue light spectrum was associated with breast cancer [adjusted odds ratio (OR) for highest vs. lowest tertile, OR=1.47; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.17] and prostate cancer (OR=2.05; 95% CI: 1.38, 3.03). In contrast, those exposed to the highest versus lowest intensity of outdoor ALAN were more likely to be controls than cases, particularly for prostate cancer. Compared with those who reported sleeping in total darkness, men who slept in “quite illuminated” bedrooms had a higher risk of prostate cancer (OR=2.79; 95% CI: 1.55, 5.04), whereas women had a slightly lower risk of breast cancer (OR=0.77; 95% CI: 0.39, 1.51).

Conclusion: Both prostate and breast cancer were associated with high estimated exposure to outdoor ALAN in the blue-enriched light spectrum.
 
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  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1871  
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Author Griepentrog, J.E.; Labiner, H.E.; Gunn, S.R.; Rosengart, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bright environmental light improves the sleepiness of nightshift ICU nurses Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Critical Care (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Crit Care  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 295  
  Keywords Circadian; Light; Night shift; Nurse; Shift work sleep disorder  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Shift work can disturb circadian homeostasis and result in fatigue, excessive sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. Light therapy has been shown to impart positive effects in night shift workers. We sought to determine whether or not prolonged exposure to bright light during a night shift reduces sleepiness and enhances psychomotor performance among ICU nurses.

METHODS: This is a single-center randomized, crossover clinical trial at a surgical trauma ICU. ICU nurses working a night shift were exposed to a 10-h period of high illuminance (1500-2000 lx) white light compared to standard ambient fluorescent lighting of the hospital. They then completed the Stanford Sleepiness Scale and the Psychomotor Vigilance Test. The primary and secondary endpoints were analyzed using the paired t test. A p value <0.05 was considered significant.

RESULTS: A total of 43 matched pairs completed both lighting exposures and were analyzed. When exposed to high illuminance lighting subjects experienced reduced sleepiness scores on the Stanford Sleepiness Scale than when exposed to standard hospital lighting: mean (sem) 2.6 (0.2) vs. 3.0 (0.2), p = 0.03. However, they committed more psychomotor errors: 2.3 (0.2) vs. 1.7 (0.2), p = 0.03.

CONCLUSIONS: A bright lighting environment for ICU nurses working the night shift reduces sleepiness but increases the number of psychomotor errors.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03331822 . Retrospectively registered on 6 November 2017.
 
  Address Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. rosengartmr@upmc.edu  
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  ISSN 1364-8535 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:30424793 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2070  
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Author Wittenbrink, N.; Ananthasubramaniam, B.; Munch, M.; Koller, B.; Maier, B.; Weschke, C.; Bes, F.; de Zeeuw, J.; Nowozin, C.; Wahnschaffe, A.; Wisniewski, S.; Zaleska, M.; Bartok, O.; Ashwal-Fluss, R.; Lammert, H.; Herzel, H.; Hummel, M.; Kadener, S.; Kunz, D.; Kramer, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title High-accuracy determination of internal circadian time from a single blood sample Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Clinical Investigation Abbreviated Journal J Clin Invest  
  Volume 128 Issue 9 Pages 3826-3839  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: The circadian clock is a fundamental and pervasive biological program that coordinates 24-hour rhythms in physiology, metabolism, and behavior, and it is essential to health. Whereas therapy adapted to time of day is increasingly reported to be highly successful, it needs to be personalized, since internal circadian time is different for each individual. In addition, internal time is not a stable trait, but is influenced by many factors, including genetic predisposition, age, sex, environmental light levels, and season. An easy and convenient diagnostic tool is currently missing. METHODS: To establish a validated test, we followed a 3-stage biomarker development strategy: (a) using circadian transcriptomics of blood monocytes from 12 individuals in a constant routine protocol combined with machine learning approaches, we identified biomarkers for internal time; and these biomarkers (b) were migrated to a clinically relevant gene expression profiling platform (NanoString) and (c) were externally validated using an independent study with 28 early or late chronotypes. RESULTS: We developed a highly accurate and simple assay (BodyTime) to estimate the internal circadian time in humans from a single blood sample. Our assay needs only a small set of blood-based transcript biomarkers and is as accurate as the current gold standard method, dim-light melatonin onset, at smaller monetary, time, and sample-number cost. CONCLUSION: The BodyTime assay provides a new diagnostic tool for personalization of health care according to the patient's circadian clock. FUNDING: This study was supported by the Bundesministerium fur Bildung und Forschung, Germany (FKZ: 13N13160 and 13N13162) and Intellux GmbH, Germany.  
  Address Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universitat Berlin, Humboldt-Universitat zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Laboratory of Chronobiology, Berlin, Germany  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-9738 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29953415; PMCID:PMC6118629 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2194  
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