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Author Park, C.Y.
Title Night Light Pollution and Ocular Fatigue Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Korean Medical Science Abbreviated Journal J Korean Med Sci
Volume 33 Issue 38 Pages e257
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract
Address (down) Department of Ophthalmology, Dongguk University, Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1011-8934 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30220898; PMCID:PMC6137033 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2011
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Author Nelson, R.J.; Chbeir, S.
Title Dark matters: effects of light at night on metabolism Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Nutr Soc
Volume 77 Issue 3 Pages 223-229
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Life on earth has evolved during the past several billion years under relatively bright days and dark night conditions. The wide-spread adoption of electric lights during the past century exposed animals, both human and non-human, to significant light at night for the first time in their evolutionary history. Endogenous circadian clocks depend on light to entrain to the external daily environment and seasonal rhythms depend on clear nightly melatonin signals to assess time of year. Thus, light at night can derange temporal adaptations. Indeed, disruption of naturally evolved light-dark cycles results in several physiological and behavioural changes with potentially serious implications for physiology, behaviour and mood. In this review, data from night-shift workers on their elevated risk for metabolic disorders, as well as data from animal studies will be discussed. Night-shift workers are predisposed to obesity and dysregulated metabolism that may result from disrupted circadian rhythms. Although studies in human subjects are correlative, animal studies have revealed several mechanisms through which light at night may exert its effects on metabolism by disrupting circadian rhythms that are associated with inflammation, both in the brain and in the periphery. Disruption of the typical timing of food intake is a key effect of light at night and subsequent metabolic dysregulation. Strategies to avoid the effects of light at night on body mass dysregulation should be pursued.
Address (down) Department of Neuroscience,The Ohio State University,Columbus, OH 43210,USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0029-6651 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29747703 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1896
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Author Russart, K.L.G.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Light at night as an environmental endocrine disruptor Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav
Volume 190 Issue Pages 82-89
Keywords Human Health; Animals
Abstract Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are often consequences of human activity; however, the effects of EEDs are not limited to humans. A primary focus over the past approximately 30years has been on chemical EEDs, but the repercussions of non-chemical EEDs, such as artificial light at night (LAN), are of increasing interest. The sensitivity of the circadian system to light and the influence of circadian organization on overall physiology and behavior make the system a target for disruption with widespread effects. Indeed, there is increasing evidence for a role of LAN in human health, including disruption of circadian regulation and melatonin signaling, metabolic dysregulation, cancer risk, and disruption of other hormonally-driven systems. These effects are not limited to humans; domesticated animals as well as wildlife are also exposed to LAN, and at risk for disrupted circadian rhythms. Here, we review data that support the role of LAN as an endocrine disruptor in humans to be considered in treatments and lifestyle suggestions. We also present the effects of LAN in other animals, and discuss the potential for ecosystem-wide effects of artificial LAN. This can inform decisions in agricultural practices and urban lighting decisions to avoid unintended outcomes.
Address (down) Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28870443 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1719
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Author Hanifin, J.P.; Lockley, S.W.; Cecil, K.; West, K.; Jablonski, M.; Warfield, B.; James, M.; Ayers, M.; Byrne, B.; Gerner, E.; Pineda, C.; Rollag, M.; Brainard, G.C.
Title Randomized trial of polychromatic blue-enriched light for circadian phase shifting, melatonin suppression, and alerting responses Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Wavelength comparisons have indicated that circadian phase-shifting and enhancement of subjective and EEG-correlates of alertness have a higher sensitivity to short wavelength visible light. The aim of the current study was to test whether polychromatic light enriched in the blue portion of the spectrum (17,000K) has increased efficacy for melatonin suppression, circadian phase-shifting, and alertness as compared to an equal photon density exposure to a standard white polychromatic light (4000K). Twenty healthy participants were studied in a time-free environment for 7days. The protocol included two baseline days followed by a 26-h constant routine (CR1) to assess initial circadian phase. Following CR1, participants were exposed to a full-field fluorescent light (1x10(14) photons/cm(2)/s, 4000K or 17,000K, n=10/condition) for 6.5h during the biological night. Following an 8h recovery sleep, a second 30-h CR was performed. Melatonin suppression was assessed from the difference during the light exposure and the corresponding clock time 24h earlier during CR1. Phase-shifts were calculated from the clock time difference in dim light melatonin onset time (DLMO) between CR1 and CR2. Blue-enriched light caused significantly greater suppression of melatonin than standard light ((mean+/-SD) 70.9+/-19.6% and 42.8+/-29.1%, respectively, p<0.05). There was no significant difference in the magnitude of phase delay shifts. Blue-enriched light significantly improved subjective alertness (p<0.05) but no differences were found for objective alertness. These data contribute to the optimization of the short wavelength-enriched spectra and intensities needed for circadian, neuroendocrine and neurobehavioral regulation.
Address (down) Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30296404 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2025
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Author Abbott, S.M.; Malkani, R.G.; Zee, P.C.
Title Circadian disruption and human health: A bidirectional relationship Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract Circadian rhythm disorders have been classically associated with disorders of abnormal timing of the sleep-wake cycle, however circadian dysfunction can play a role in a wide range of pathology, ranging from the increased risk for cardiometabolic disease and malignancy in shift workers, prompting the need for a new field focused on the larger concept of circadian medicine. The relationship between circadian disruption and human health is bidirectional, with changes in circadian amplitude often preceding the classical symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders. As our understanding of the importance of circadian dysfunction in disease grows, we need to develop better clinical techniques for identifying circadian rhythms and also develop circadian based strategies for disease management. Overall this review highlights the need to bring the concept of time to all aspects of medicine, emphasizing circadian medicine as a prime example of both personalized and precision medicine.
Address (down) Department of Neurology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30549337 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2154
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