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Author Gonzalez, T.J.; Lu, Y.; Boswell, M.; Boswell, W.; Medrano, G.; Walter, S.; Ellis, S.; Savage, M.; Varga, Z.M.; Lawrence, C.; Sanders, G.; Walter, R.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Fluorescent light exposure incites acute and prolonged immune responses in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) skin Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Toxicology & Pharmacology : CBP Abbreviated Journal Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol  
  Volume 208 Issue Pages 87-95  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light produces an emission spectrum that is considerably different than the solar spectrum. Artificial light has been shown to affect various behavior and physiological processes in vertebrates. However, there exists a paucity of data regarding the molecular genetic effects of artificial light exposure. Previous studies showed that one of the commonly used fluorescent light source (FL; 4100K or “cool white”) can affect signaling pathways related to maintenance of circadian rhythm, cell cycle progression, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair/recombination in the skin of male Xiphophorus maculatus. These observations raise questions concerning the kinetics of the FL induced gene expression response, and which biological functions become modulated at various times after light exposure. To address these questions, we exposed zebrafish to 4100K FL and utilized RNASeq to assess gene expression changes in skin at various times (1 to 12h) after FL exposure. We found 4100K FL incites a robust early (1-2h) transcriptional response, followed by a more protracted late response (i.e., 4-12h). The early transcriptional response involves genes associated with cell migration/infiltration and cell proliferation as part of an overall increase in immune function and inflammation. The protracted late transcriptional response occurs within gene sets predicted to maintain and perpetuate the inflammatory response, as well as suppression of lipid, xenobiotic, and melatonin metabolism.  
  Address (down) Xiphophorus Genetic Stock Center, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 419 Centennial Hall, Texas State University, 601 University Drive, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA. Electronic address: RWalter@txstate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1532-0456 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28965927 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1740  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sanders, D.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How ecological communities respond to artificial light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 394-400  
  Keywords Ecology  
  Abstract Many ecosystems worldwide are exposed to artificial light at night (ALAN), from streetlights and other sources, and a wide range of organisms has been shown to respond to this anthropogenic pressure. This raises concerns about the consequences for major ecosystem functions and their stability. However, there is limited understanding of how whole ecological communities respond to ALAN, and this cannot be gained simply by making predictions from observed single species physiological, behavioral, or ecological responses. Research needs to include an important building block of ecological communities, namely the interactions between species that drive ecological and evolutionary processes in ecosystems. Here, we summarize current knowledge about community responses to ALAN and illustrate different pathways and their impact on ecosystem functioning and stability. We discuss that documentation of the impact of ALAN on species interaction networks and trait distributions provides useful tools to link changes in community structure to ecosystem functions. Finally, we suggest several approaches to advance research that will link the diverse impact of ALAN to changes in ecosystems.  
  Address (down) Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, Institute for Advanced Study, Berlin, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29656458 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1857  
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Author Pilz, L.K.; Levandovski, R.; Oliveira, M.A.B.; Hidalgo, M.P.; Roenneberg, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep and light exposure across different levels of urbanisation in Brazilian communities Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 11389  
  Keywords Human Health; Sleep  
  Abstract Quilombos are settlements originally founded by Africans and African descendants (Quilombolas) in remote parts of Brazil to escape slavery. Due to individual histories, Quilombos nowadays exhibit different states of industrialisation, making them ideal for studying the influence of electrification on daily behaviour. In a comparative approach, we aimed to understand whether and how human sleep changes with the introduction of artificial light. We investigated daily rest-activity-rhythms and sleep-patterns in the Quilombolas' by both wrist actimetry and the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ; the results of these two instruments correlated highly). Seven communities (MCTQ: N = 213/actimetry: N = 125) were compared in this study. Light exposure, phase of activity, sleep timing and duration differ across communities with various levels of urbanisation and histories of access to electricity. People living without electricity and those, who acquired it only very recently on average sleep earlier than those in more urbanised communities (mid-sleep about 1 hour earlier); sleep duration tends to be longer. Our results and those of others show that use of electricity and modern lifestyles have changed sleep behaviour. To understand the consequences of these changes for health, further studies are warranted.  
  Address (down) Visiting Professor at UFRGS/CAPES, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. roenneberg@lmu.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30061685 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1968  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pattison, P.M.; Tsao, J.Y.; Brainard, G.C.; Bugbee, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title LEDs for photons, physiology and food Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 563 Issue 7732 Pages 493-500  
  Keywords Review; Lighting; Human Health; Plants  
  Abstract Lighting based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) not only is more energy efficient than traditional lighting, but also enables improved performance and control. The colour, intensity and distribution of light can now be controlled with unprecedented precision, enabling light to be used both as a signal for specific physiological responses in humans and plants, and as an efficient fuel for fresh food production. Here we show how a broad and improved understanding of the physiological responses to light will facilitate greater energy savings and provide health and productivity benefits that have not previously been associated with lighting.  
  Address (down) Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30464269 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2110  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stafstrom, J.A.; Hebets, E.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Male attraction to female airborne cues by the net-casting spider, Deinopis spinosa Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behav Processes  
  Volume 159 Issue Pages 23-30  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract For many animals, finding a mate can be a difficult task. For males, it often involves actively searching for conspecific females, sometimes over great distances. This mate-searching can be aided through chemical or visual signals or cues produced by sexually receptive females. Here, we investigate the roles of olfaction and vision in mate-searching in a strictly nocturnal net-casting spider, Deinopis spinosa. First, we used an olfactometer assay to determine if mature male D. spinosa respond to conspecific airborne cues. We found that mature males, but not mature females, were attracted to airborne cues of mature female conspecifics. We next investigated the relative importance of olfaction and vision in male mate-searching. While manipulating airflow and light levels in screened enclosures in the laboratory, we tested freely moving mature males for mate-searching success. We found no effect of our airflow treatment on mate-searching success. Light levels, however, affected mate-searching in an unexpected way – males were more likely to locate females in complete darkness when compared to dim-light conditions. Our results suggest that visual cues are not necessary for successful male mate-searching in D. spinosa, but that the visual environment can nonetheless influence male behavior. In summary, we provide evidence suggesting that airborne cues, but not visual cues, are important in D. spinosa male mate-searching efforts, though the source of these chemical airborne cues remains unknown.  
  Address (down) University of Nebraska – Lincoln, School of Biological Sciences, NE, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0376-6357 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30562562 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2152  
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