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Author (up) Aubé, M.; Simoneau, A.
Title New features to the night sky radiance model illumina: Hyperspectral support, improved obstacles and cloud reflection Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume 211 Issue Pages 25-34
Keywords
Abstract Illumina is one of the most physically detailed artificial night sky brightness model to date. It has been in continuous development since 2005 [1]. In 2016–17, many improvements were made to the Illumina code including an overhead cloud scheme, an improved blocking scheme for subgrid obstacles (trees and buildings), and most importantly, a full hyperspectral modeling approach. Code optimization resulted in significant reduction in execution time enabling users to run the model on standard personal computers for some applications.

After describing the new schemes introduced in the model, we give some examples of applications for a peri-urban and a rural site both located inside the International Dark Sky reserve of Mont-Mégantic (QC, Canada).
Address Cégep de Sherbrooke, 475, rue du Cégep, Sherbrooke, Québec J1E 4K1, Canada; martin.aube(at)cegepsherbrooke.qc.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1818
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Author (up) Aubé, M.; Simoneau, A.; Wainscoat, R.; Nelson, L.
Title Modeling the effects of phosphor converted LED lighting to the night sky of the Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 478 Issue 2 Pages 1776-1783
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract The goal of this study is to evaluate the current level of light pollution in the night sky at the Haleakala Observatory on the island of Maui in Hawaii. This is accomplished with a numerical model that was tested in the first International Dark Sky Reserve located in Mont-Mégantic National Park in Canada. The model uses ground data on the artificial light sources present in the region of study, geographical data, and remotely sensed data for: 1) the nightly upward radiance; 2) the terrain elevation; and, 3) the ground spectral reflectance of the region. The results of the model give a measure of the current state of the sky spectral radiance at the Haleakala Observatory. Then, using the current state as a reference point, multiple light conversion plans are elaborated and evaluated using the model. We can thus estimate the expected impact of each conversion plan on the night sky radiance spectrum. A complete conversion to white (LEDs) with (CCT) of 4000K and 3000K are contrasted with a conversion using (PC) amber (LEDs). We include recommendations concerning the street lamps to be used in sensitive areas like the cities of Kahului and Kihei and suggest best lighting practices related to the color of lamps used at night.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1907
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Author (up) Aulsebrook, A.E.; Jones, T.M.; Mulder, R.A.; Lesku, J.A.
Title Impacts of artificial light at night on sleep: A review and prospectus Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 409-418
Keywords Review; Animals; Health
Abstract Natural cycles of light and darkness govern the timing of most aspects of animal behavior and physiology. Artificial light at night (ALAN)-a recent and pervasive form of pollution-can mask natural photoperiodic cues and interfere with biological rhythms. One such rhythm vulnerable to perturbation is the sleep-wake cycle. ALAN may greatly influence sleep in humans and wildlife, particularly in animals that sleep predominantly at night. There has been some recent evidence for impacts of ALAN on sleep, but critical questions remain. Some of these can be addressed by adopting approaches already entrenched in sleep research. In this paper, we review the current evidence for impacts of ALAN on sleep, highlight gaps in our understanding, and suggest opportunities for future research.
Address La Trobe University, School of Life Sciences, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29869374 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1933
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Author (up) Ayuga, C.E.T.; Zamorano, J.
Title LICA AstroCalc, a software to analyze the impact of artificial light: Extracting parameters from the spectra of street and indoor lamps Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume 214 Issue Pages 33-38
Keywords Vision; Lighting; Instrumentation
Abstract The night sky spectra of light-polluted areas is the result of the artificial light scattered back from the atmosphere and the reemission of the light after reflections in painted surfaces. This emission comes mainly from street and decorative lamps. We have built an extensive database of lamps spectra covering from UV to near IR and the software needed to analyze them. We describe the LICA-AstroCalc free software that is a user friendly GUI tool to extract information from our database spectra or any other user provided spectrum. The software also includes the complete color database of paints from NCS comprising 1950 types. This helps to evaluate how different colors modify the reflected spectra from different lamps. All spectroscopic measurements have been validated with recommendations from CIELAB and ISO from NCS database.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1882
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Author (up) Azam, C.; Le Viol, I.; Bas, Y.; Zissis, G.; Vernet, A.; Julien, J.-F.; Kerbiriou, C.
Title Evidence for distance and illuminance thresholds in the effects of artificial lighting on bat activity Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning
Volume 175 Issue Pages 123-135
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution is a major threat to biodiversity worldwide. There is a crucial need to elaborate artificial lighting recommendations to mitigate its impact on wildlife. In the present study, we investigated how streetlight spatial position and light trespass impacted the use of ecological corridors by transiting bats in anthropogenic landscapes. Through a paired, in situ experiment, we estimated how streetlight distance of impact and vertical and horizontal illuminance influenced the transiting activity of 6 species and 2 genera of bats. We selected 27 pairs composed of 1 lit site and 1 control unlit site in areas practicing either part-night or full-night lighting. We recorded bat activity at 0, 10, 25, 50 and 100 m, and measured vertical and horizontal light illuminance at the 5 distance steps (range = 0.1–30.2 lx). While streetlight attraction effect was mostly limited to a 10 m radius for Pipistrellus sp. and Nyctalus sp., streetlight avoidance was detected at up to 25 and 50 m for Myotis sp. and Eptesicus serotinus, respectively. Streetlight effects on Myotis sp. and Nyctalus sp. remained after lamps were turned-off. Illuminance had a negative effect on Myotis sp. below 1 lx, a mixed effect on E. serotinus, and a positive effect on the other species, although a peak of activity was observed between 1 and 5 lx for P. pipistrellus and N. leisleri. We recommend separating streetlights from ecological corridors by at least 50 m and avoiding vertical light trespass beyond 0.1 lx to ensure their use by light-sensitive bats.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1842
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