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Author (up) Boucher, R.; Knefati, S.; Ouimet, C.-A.
Title Conservation du ciel nocturne : surveillance de l’éclairage extérieur et de la pollution lumineuse au parc national et à la Réserve internationale de ciel étoilé du Mont-Mégantic Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Le Naturaliste canadien Abbreviated Journal Le Naturaliste canadien
Volume 142 Issue 3 Pages 88
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract English:

Although seemingly unchanging, today, our ability to see stars on a dark night is in danger of disappearing. The reason for this is the widespread growth of light pollution from inadequate lighting systems. This study, which used a range of methods, presents the results of light pollution measurements taken within the Mont-Mégantic International Dark Sky Reserve (MMIDSR), which was created in 2007 to protect the quality of astronomical observations and research at the Mont-Mégantic Observatory, and to preserve the exceptional starry nightscape visible from the site. Two essential elements of artificial night lighting were considered: its source and its diffusion in the atmosphere. Analyses showed that despite a global trend towards an increase in light levels, population growth on the outskirts of the Parc national du Mont-Mégantic, and the arrival of problematic types of lighting fixtures on the market, the level of light pollution in the MMIDSR has remained stable over the last 10 years, not only at the zenith but across the entire sky.

French:

Pourtant d’apparence immuable, le ciel étoilé est aujourd’hui menacé de disparition. La cause est la croissance généralisée de la pollution lumineuse, résultat de l’utilisation de dispositifs d’éclairage inadéquats. Nous présentons ici les résultats de la mesure de cette pollution obtenue par différentes approches méthodologiques sur le territoire de la Réserve internationale de ciel étoilé du Mont-Mégantic (RICEMM). La RICEMM a été créée en 2007 afin de protéger la qualité des observations astronomiques et de recherche de l’observatoire du mont Mégantic, ainsi que pour conserver les paysages étoilés exceptionnels du site. Deux aspects incontournables de la lumière artificielle nocturne ont été pris en compte : ses sources, ainsi que sa diffusion dans l’atmosphère. Les analyses démontrent que le niveau de pollution lumineuse est resté stable depuis 10 ans dans la RICEMM, tant au zénith que pour l’ensemble du ciel, et ce, malgré une tendance mondiale à la hausse des niveaux d’éclairement, l’augmentation de la population dans la périphérie du parc national du Mont-Mégantic et l’arrivée sur le marché de types de luminaires problématiques.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language French Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0798 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2004
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Author (up) Bouroussis, C.A.; Topalis, F.V.
Title The effect of the spectral response of measurement instruments in the assessment of night sky brightness Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume 216 Issue Pages 56-69
Keywords Skyglow; Instrumentation
Abstract This paper deals with the errors and uncertainties in skyglow measurements caused by the variation of sky's spectrum. It considers the theoretical spectral response of common instruments that are used for light pollution assessment. Various types of light sources were used in this investigation. This study calculates the spectral mismatch errors and the corresponding correction factors for each combination of instrument and light source. The calculation method is described and the results are presented in multiple figures. Calculated data show a big variation in potential errors that can be introduced when comparing readings of diverse instruments without considering the sky spectrum variation. This makes the spectral data of the sky a mandatory input to the dark sky assessment. Useful conclusions, related to instruments with better or worse behaviour, are derived from the calculations. The paper also includes suggestions on how to conduct multi-instrument measurements with or without spectral data.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1908
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Author (up) Bowne, D.R.; Cosentino, B.J.; Anderson, L.J.; Bloch, C.P.; Cooke, S.; Crumrine, P.W.; Dallas, J.; Doran, A.; Dosch, J.J.; Druckenbrod, D.L.; Durtsche, R.D.; Garneau, D.; Genet, K.S.; Fredericksen, T.S.; Kish, P.A.; Kolozsvary, M.B.; Kuserk, F.T.; Lindquist, E.S.; Mankiewicz, C.; March, J.G.; Muir, T.J.; Murray, K.G.; Santulli, M.N.; Sicignano, F.J.; Smallwood, P.D.; Urban, R.A.; Winnett-Murray, K.; Zimmermann, C.R.
Title Effects of urbanization on the population structure of freshwater turtles across the United States Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Conservation Biology : the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Biol
Volume 32 Issue 5 Pages 1150-1161
Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing
Abstract Landscape-scale alterations that accompany urbanization may negatively affect the population structure of wildlife species such as freshwater turtles. Changes to nesting sites and higher mortality rates due to vehicular collisions and increased predator populations may particularly affect immature turtles and mature female turtles. We hypothesized that the proportions of adult female and immature turtles in a population will negatively correlate with landscape urbanization. As a collaborative effort of the Ecological Research as Education Network (EREN), we sampled freshwater turtle populations in 11 states across the central and eastern United States. Contrary to expectations, we found a significant positive relationship between proportions of mature female painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) and urbanization. We did not detect a relationship between urbanization and proportions of immature turtles. Urbanization may alter the thermal environment of nesting sites such that more females are produced as urbanization increases. Our approach of creating a collaborative network of scientists and students at undergraduate institutions proved valuable in terms of testing our hypothesis over a large spatial scale while also allowing students to gain hands-on experience in conservation science. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Department of Biology, Rogers State University, 1701 W. Will Rogers Boulevard, Claremore, OK 74017, U.S.A
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0888-8892 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29781169 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1920
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Author (up) Boyce, P.R.
Title The Present and Future of Lighting Research Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication SDAR* Journal of Sustainable Design & Applied Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Commentary; Lighting; Vision; Human Health
Abstract The aim of this paper is to consider where lighting research is today and what its future might be. There is little doubt that, today, lighting research is an active field. A brief review of the topics being studied reveals that they range from residual studies on visibility and visual discomfort, through attempts to identify the influence of lighting on factors beyond visibility such as mood and behaviour, to the whole new field of light and health. But activity alone is not enough to justify a future. For lighting research to have a future it is necessary for it to

be influential. To become influential, research needs to focus its attention on outcomes that matter to people and the elements of those outcomes on which lighting is known to have a major influence. Further, researchers will have to be determined to overcome the barriers to changing lighting practice. By doing this, lighting research may change the world for the better, to be an important topic, not an irrelevance.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2113
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Author (up) Brelsford, CC; Robson, TM
Title Blue light advances bud burst in branches of three deciduous tree species under short-day conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Trees Abbreviated Journal
Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 1157-1164
Keywords Plants
Abstract During spring, utilising multiple cues allow tree species from temperate and boreal regions to coordinate their bud burst and leaf out, at the right moment to capitalise on favourable conditions for photosynthesis. Whilst the effect of blue light (400–500 nm) has been shown to increase percentage bud burst of axillary shoots of Rosa sp., the effects of blue light on spring-time bud burst of deciduous tree species have not previously been reported. We tested the hypotheses that blue light would advance spring bud burst in tree species, and that late-successional species would respond more than early-successional species, whose bud burst is primarily determined by temperature. The bud development of Alnus glutinosa, Betula pendula, and Quercus robur branches, cut from dormant trees, was monitored under two light treatments of equal photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400–700 nm) and temperature, either with or without blue light, under controlled environmental conditions. In the presence of blue light, the mean time required to reach 50% bud burst was reduced by 3.3 days in Betula pendula, 6 days in Alnus glutinosa, and 6.3 days in Quercus robur. This result highlights the potential of the blue region of the solar spectrum to be used as an extra cue that could help plants to regulate their spring phenology, alongside photoperiod and temperature. Understanding how plants combine photoreceptor-mediated cues with other environmental cues such as temperature to control phenology is essential if we are to accurately predict how tree species might respond to climate change.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1847
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