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Author (up) Pilz, L.K.; Levandovski, R.; Oliveira, M.A.B.; Hidalgo, M.P.; Roenneberg, T.
Title Sleep and light exposure across different levels of urbanisation in Brazilian communities Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 11389
Keywords Human Health; Sleep
Abstract Quilombos are settlements originally founded by Africans and African descendants (Quilombolas) in remote parts of Brazil to escape slavery. Due to individual histories, Quilombos nowadays exhibit different states of industrialisation, making them ideal for studying the influence of electrification on daily behaviour. In a comparative approach, we aimed to understand whether and how human sleep changes with the introduction of artificial light. We investigated daily rest-activity-rhythms and sleep-patterns in the Quilombolas' by both wrist actimetry and the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ; the results of these two instruments correlated highly). Seven communities (MCTQ: N = 213/actimetry: N = 125) were compared in this study. Light exposure, phase of activity, sleep timing and duration differ across communities with various levels of urbanisation and histories of access to electricity. People living without electricity and those, who acquired it only very recently on average sleep earlier than those in more urbanised communities (mid-sleep about 1 hour earlier); sleep duration tends to be longer. Our results and those of others show that use of electricity and modern lifestyles have changed sleep behaviour. To understand the consequences of these changes for health, further studies are warranted.
Address Visiting Professor at UFRGS/CAPES, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. roenneberg@lmu.de
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:30061685 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1968
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Author (up) Point, S.
Title Blue Light Hazard: are exposure limit values protective enough for newborn infants? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Radioprotection Abbreviated Journal
Volume 53 Issue 3 Pages 219-224
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Blue Light Hazard is an emerging concern for health of population. Nevertheless, acute exposure to blue rays from artificial light is well taken into account by normative requirements applicable to lamps engineering and risk for general population is low. There is also no evidence for a chronic effect of artificial lighting on retina for general population at radiance below exposure limit values. That said, children in the very first years of life constitute a specific population to consider. On one side, eye anatomy of very young infants is different from elder young people or adults. On the other side, infants can be in close contact with some luminous toys or night lights. This paper presents a first approach for taking into account the specific anatomy of newborn infants’ eyes in blue light hazard evaluation. Results show that differences of crystalline lens transparency, focal length and pupil diameter could induce a significantly higher retinal exposure than for adult.
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1982
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Author (up) Porcheret, K.; Wald, L.; Fritschi, L.; Gerkema, M.; Gordijn, M.; Merrrow, M.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Rock, D.; Sletten, T.L.; Warman, G.; Wulff, K.; Roenneberg, T.; Foster, R.G.
Title Chronotype and environmental light exposure in a student population Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 35 Issue 10 Pages 1365-1374
Keywords Human Health
Abstract In humans and most other species, changes in the intensity and duration of light provide a critical set of signals for the synchronisation of the circadian system to the astronomical day. The timing of activity within the 24 h day defines an individual's chronotype, i.e. morning, intermediate or evening type. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between environmental light exposure, due to geographical location, on the chronotype of university students. Over 6 000 university students from cities in the Northern Hemisphere (Oxford, Munich and Groningen) and Southern Hemisphere (Perth, Melbourne and Auckland) completed the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire. In parallel, light measures (daily irradiance, timing of sunrise and sunset) were compiled from satellite or ground stations at each of these locations. Our data shows that later mid-sleep point on free days (corrected for oversleep on weekends MFSsc) is associated with (i) residing further from the equator, (ii) a later sunset, (iii) spending more time outside and (iv) waking from sleep significantly after sunrise. However, surprisingly, MSFsc did not correlate with daily light intensity at the different geographical locations. Although these findings appear to contradict earlier studies suggesting that in the wider population increased light exposure is associated with an earlier chronotype, our findings are derived exclusively from a student population aged between 17 and 26 years. We therefore suggest that the age and occupation of our population increase the likelihood that these individuals will experience relatively little light exposure in the morning whilst encountering more light exposure later in the day, when light has a delaying effect upon the circadian system.
Address a Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute (SCNi), Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences , University of Oxford , Oxford , UK
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ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:29913073 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1962
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Author (up) Posch, T.; Binder, F.; Puschnig, J.
Title Systematic measurements of the night sky brightness at 26 locations in Eastern Austria Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume 211 Issue Pages 144-165
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract We present an analysis of the zenithal night sky brightness (henceforth: NSB) measurements at 26 locations in Eastern Austria focussing on the years 2015-2016, both during clear and cloudy to overcast nights. All measurements have been performed with ’Sky Quality Meters’ (SQMs). For some of the locations, simultaneous aerosol content measurements are available, such that we were able to find a correlation between light pollution and air pollution at those stations. For all locations, we examined the circalunar periodicity of the NSB, seasonal variations as well as long-term trends in the recorded light pollution. The latter task proved difficult, however, due to varying meteorological conditions, potential detector ’aging’ and other effects. For several remote locations, a darkening of the overcast night sky by up to 1 magnitude is recorded – indicating a very low level of light pollution –, while for the majority of the examined locations, a brightening of the night sky by up to a factor of 15 occurs due to clouds. We present suitable ways to plot and analyze huge long-term NSB datasets, such as mean-NSB histograms, circalunar, annual (’hourglass’) and cumulative (’jellyfish’) plots. We show that five of the examined locations reach sufficiently low levels of light pollution – with NSB values down to 21.8 magSQM/arcsec2 – as to allow the establishment of dark sky reserves, even to the point of reaching the ’gold tier’ defined by the International Dark Sky Association. Based on the ’hourglass’ plots, we find a strong circalunar periodicity of the NSB in small towns and villages ( <  5.000 inhabitants), with amplitudes of of up to 5 magnitudes. Using the ’jellyfish’ plots, on the other hand, we demonstrate that the examined city skies brighten by up to 3 magnitudes under cloudy conditions, which strongly dominate in those cumulative data representations. Nocturnal gradients of the NSB of 0.0–0.14 magSQM/arcsec2/hr are found. The long-term development of the night sky brightness was evaluated based on the 2012-17 data for one of our sites, possibly indicating a slight ( 2%) decrease of the mean zenithal NSB at the Vienna University Observatory.
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ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1825
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Author (up) Price, J.T.; Drye, B.; Domangue, R.J.; Paladino, F.V.
Title Exploring The Role of Artificial Lighting in Loggerhead Turtle (Caretta caretta) Nest-Site Selection and Hatchling Disorientation Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Herpetological Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 415-422
Keywords Animals
Abstract Beachfront artificial lighting can deter nesting sea turtles and disrupt the seaward orientation of hatchlings following their emergence from the nest. We investigated the effects of variable artificial lighting along the 17.5-km beachfront of St. George Island, Florida, USA on both nesting and hatchling Loggerhead Turtles (Caretta caretta). We hypothesized that illumination affects nest-site selection and hatchling orientation of Loggerhead Turtles. We predicted that zones with higher artificial luminance levels would have a reduced number of nests laid by Loggerhead Turtles, as well as an increased hatchling disorientation rate. We divided the beachfront into zones 500 m in length and recorded nighttime luminance measurements with a photometer throughout the 2015 nesting season. The 2015 luminance values were analyzed together with Loggerhead Turtle nesting data from the 2015 season, as well as related to a longer-term dataset from 2011–2015. We found a negative relationship between nestsite selection and the intensity of artificial luminance, such that the brighter zones along the beachfront had fewer nests. Within this relationship, we found that nest density was significantly lower above a beachfront luminance value of ~800 μcd/m2. Finally, we found that hatchling disorientations occurred more frequently in zones with greater luminance. While many factors can affect nesting and hatchling Loggerhead behavior, our results suggest that variable intensities of artificial lighting at a nesting site may lead to a spatially clumped arrangement of nests and hatchling disorientations. These results can help improve the conservation and protection of nesting habitat as they further our understanding of the effects of artificial beachfront lighting on Loggerhead Turtles.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2106
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