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Author (up) Rahman, S.A.; St Hilaire, M.A.; Gronfier, C.; Chang, A.-M.; Santhi, N.; Czeisler, C.A.; Klerman, E.B.; Lockley, S.W.
Title Functional decoupling of melatonin suppression and circadian phase resetting in humans Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol
Volume 596 Issue 11 Pages 2147-2157
Keywords Human Health
Abstract KEY POINTS: There is assumed to be a monotonic association between melatonin suppression and circadian phase resetting induced by light exposure. We tested the association between melatonin suppression and phase resetting in humans. Sixteen young healthy participants received nocturnal bright light ( approximately 9500 lux) exposure of continuous or intermittent patterns, and different durations ranging from 12 min to 6.5 h. Intermittent exposure patterns showed significant phase shifts with disproportionately less melatonin suppression. Each and every bright light stimulus in an intermittent exposure pattern induced a similar degree of melatonin suppression, but did not appear to cause an equal magnitude of phase shift. These results suggest that phase shifts and melatonin suppression are functionally independent such that one cannot be used as a proxy measure of the other. ABSTRACT: Continuous experimental light exposures show that, in general, the conditions that produce greater melatonin suppression also produce greater phase shift, leading to the assumption that one can be used as a proxy for the other. We tested this association in 16 healthy individuals who participated in a 9-day inpatient protocol by assessing melatonin suppression and phase resetting in response to a nocturnal light exposure (LE) of different patterns: (i) dim-light control (<3 lux; n = 6) or (ii) two 12-min intermittent bright light pulses (IBL) separated by 36 min of darkness ( approximately 9500 lux; n = 10). We compared these results with historical data from additional LE patterns: (i) dim-light control (<3 lux; n = 11); (ii) single continuous bright light exposure of 12 min (n = 9), 1.0 h (n = 10) or 6.5 h (n = 6); or (iii) an IBL light pattern consisting of six 15-min pulses with 1.0 h dim-light recovery intervals between them during a total of 6.5 h (n = 7). All light exposure groups had significantly greater phase-delay shifts than the dim-light control condition (P < 0.0001). While a monotonic association between melatonin suppression and circadian phase shift was observed, intermittent exposure patterns showed significant phase shifts with disproportionately less melatonin suppression. Each and every IBL stimulus induced a similar degree of melatonin suppression, but did not appear to cause an equal magnitude of phase shift. These results suggest unique specificities in how light-induced phase shifts and melatonin suppression are mediated such that one cannot be used as a proxy measure of the other.
Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-3751 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29707782 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1887
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Author (up) Rea, M.
Title The what and the where of vision lighting research Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume 50 Issue 1 Pages 14-37
Keywords Vision; Review
Abstract Vision neuroscience research and vision lighting research have historically run on parallel paths. The former discipline is primarily interested in understanding the basic neurophysiological and biophysical characteristics of the visual system, while the latter is primarily interested in understanding the best means for designing and engineering perceptions of architectural spaces and for improving safety and productivity of indoor and outdoor applications. This review frames vision lighting research conducted over the past century in terms of current vision neuroscience research, illustrating the similarities in the two research paths. It is also argued that visual lighting research could be more impactful on society at large if the basic framework established by vision neuroscience were considered in planning and conducting applications research. Specifically, studies aimed at understanding the luminous environment in terms of the what and the where of visual subsystems would provide the foundation for developing unique and highly valuable lighting applications and standards.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1956
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Author (up) Rea, M.; Skinner, N.; Bullough, J.
Title A Novel Barricade Warning Light System Using Wireless Communications Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication SAE Technical Paper 2018-01-5036 Abbreviated Journal
Volume In press Issue Pages
Keywords Lighting; Safety
Abstract Workers in construction and transportation sectors are at increased risk for work-related injuries and fatalities by nearby traffic. Barricade-mounted warning lights meeting current specifications do not always provide consistent and adequate visual guidance to drivers and can contribute to glare and reduced safety. Through an implementation of sensors and wireless communications, a novel, intelligent set of warning lights and a tablet-based interface were developed. The lights modulate between 100% and 10% of maximum intensity rather than between 100% and off in order to improve visual guidance and adjust their overall intensity based on ambient conditions. The lights can be synchronized or operated in sequential flash patterns at any frequency between 1 and 4 Hz, and sequential patterns automatically update based on global positioning satellite (GPS) locations displayed in the control interface. A successful field demonstration of the system verified that its functions were viewed favorably by transportation safety personnel.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2117
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Author (up) Robertson, B.A., Horváth, G.
Title Color polarization vision mediates the strength of an evolutionary trap Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Wiley Evolutionary Applications Abbreviated Journal
Volume In press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Evolutionary traps are scenarios in which animals are fooled by rapidly changing conditions into preferring poor-quality resources over those that better improve survival and reproductive success. The maladaptive attraction of aquatic insects to artificial sources of horizontally polarized light (e.g., glass buildings, asphalt roads) has become a first model system by which scientists can investigate the behavioral mechanisms that cause traps to occur. We employ this field-based system to experimentally investigate (a) in which portion(s) of the spectrum are polarizationally water-imitating reflectors attractive to nocturnal terrestrial and aquatics insects, and (b) which modern lamp types result in greater attraction in this typical kind of nocturnal polarized light pollution. We found that most aquatic taxa exhibited preferences for lamps based upon their color spectra, most having lowest preference for lamps emitting blue and red light. Yet, despite previously established preference for higher degrees of polarization of reflected light, most aquatic insect families were attracted to traps based upon their unpolarized spectrum. Chironomid midges, alone, showed a preference for the color of lamplight in both the horizontally polarized and unpolarized spectra indicating only this family has evolved to use light in this color range as a source of information to guide its nocturnal habitat selection. These results demonstrate that the color of artificial lighting can exacerbate or reduce its attractiveness to aquatic insects, but that the strength of attractiveness of nocturnal evolutionary traps, and so their demographic consequences, is primarily driven by unpolarized light pollution. This focuses management attention on limiting broad-spectrum light pollution, as well as its intentional deployment to attract insects back to natural habitats.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2076
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Author (up) Robertson, B.A.; Keddy-Hector, I.A.; Shrestha, S.D.; Silverberg, L.Y.; Woolner, C.E.; Hetterich, I.; Horváth, G.
Title Susceptibility to ecological traps is similar among closely related taxa but sensitive to spatial isolation Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal
Volume 135 Issue Pages 77-84
Keywords aquatic insect; behaviour; evolutionary trap; light pollution; maladaptation; polarized light pollution
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1793
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