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Author (up) Russo, D., Ancillotto, L., Cistrone, L., Libralato, N., Domer, A., Cohen, S., Korine, C.
Title Effects of artificial illumination on drinking bats: a field test in forest and desert habitats Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume In press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Bats show pronounced and often‐adverse reactions to artificial illumination at night (ALAN) when commuting, roosting or foraging. ALAN also affects bat drinking activity, at least when lighting occurs over short intervals. We tested whether continuous illumination of drinking sites over 4‐h periods would lead bats to tolerate ALAN and resume drinking in the course of the night. We conducted our experiments in forest (Italy) and desert (Israel) sites to test whether in the latter habitat, where water is scarce, a greater motivation to drink might lead to less adverse bat reactions. We recorded 6853 drinking buzzes and 1647 feeding buzzes from 17 species and one species group. In the forest sites, species that hunt in open spaces or along forest edges showed little (P. pipistrellus and H. savii) or no (P. kuhlii and N. leisleri) drinking activity decrease, while those associated with forest interiors (Barbastella barbastellus, Plecotus auritus and bats in the genus Myotis) exhibited a strong negative response. In the desert sites, all studied species reduced drinking activity, yet in the desert populations of P. kuhlii we recorded stronger adverse reactions only far from human settlements. The harsh reactions that the desert bat species showed towards ALAN rule out any effect of a greater motivation to drink. Illumination had no effect on foraging by most species, except in the forest sites, where Pipistrellus kuhlii and Nyctalus leisleri increased foraging when the light was on, and in the desert sites, where Hypsugo bodenheimeri decreased foraging in such situations. The progressive human encroachment that is taking place in many world regions on both forests and especially deserts, where few sites for drinking are available, may jeopardize bat populations also through increased exposure to ALAN.
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Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2075
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Author (up) Rybnikova, N.; Portnov, B.A.
Title Population-level study links short-wavelength nighttime illumination with breast cancer incidence in a major metropolitan area Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 35 Issue 9 Pages 1198-1208
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Several population-level studies revealed a positive association between breast cancer (BC) incidence and artificial light at night (ALAN) exposure. However, the effect of short-wavelength illumination, implicated by laboratory research and small-scale cohort studies as the main driving force behind BC-ALAN association, has not been supported by any population-level study carried out to date. We investigated a possible link between BC and ALAN of different subspectra using a multi-spectral year-2011 satellite image, taken from the International Space Station, and superimposing it with year-2013 BC incidence data available for the Great Haifa Metropolitan Area in Israel. The analysis was performed using both ordinary least square (OLS) and spatial dependency models, controlling for socioeconomic and locational attributes of the study area. The study revealed strong associations between BC and blue and green light subspectra (B = 0.336 +/- 0.001 and B = 0.335 +/- 0.002, respectively; p < 0.01), compared to a somewhat weaker effect for the red subspectrum (B = 0.056 +/- 0.001; p < 0.01). However, spatial dependency models, controlling for spatial autocorrelation of regression residuals, confirmed only a positive association between BC incidence and short-wavelength (blue) ALAN subspectrum (z = 2.462, p < 0.05) while reporting insignificant associations between BC and either green (z = 1.425, p > 0.1) or red (z = -0.604, p > 0.1) subspectra. The obtained result is in line with the results of laboratory- and small-scale cohort studies linking short-wavelength nighttime illumination with circadian disruption and melatonin suppression. The detected effect of blue lights on BC incidence may help to develop informed illumination policies aimed at minimizing the adverse health effects of ALAN exposure on human health.
Address a Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management , University of Haifa , Haifa , Israel
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ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:29768068 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1906
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Author (up) Rybnikova, N.; Stevens, R.G.; Gregorio, D.I.; Samociuk, H.; Portnov, B.A.
Title Kernel density analysis reveals a halo pattern of breast cancer incidence in Connecticut Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology
Volume 26 Issue Pages 143-151
Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing
Abstract Breast cancer (BC) incidence rates in Connecticut are among the highest in the United States, and are unevenly distributed within the state. Our goal was to determine whether artificial light at night (ALAN) played a role. Using BC records obtained from the Connecticut Tumor Registry, we applied the double kernel density (DKD) estimator to produce a continuous relative risk surface of a disease throughout the State. A multi-variate analysis compared DKD and census track estimates with population density, fertility rate, percent of non-white population, population below poverty level, and ALAN levels. The analysis identified a “halo” geographic pattern of BC incidence, with the highest rates of the disease observed at distances 5-15 km from the state's major cities. The “halo” was of high-income communities, with high ALAN, located in suburban fringes of the state's main cities.
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ISSN 1877-5845 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1961
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Author (up) S Fotios, J Uttley
Title Illuminance required to detect a pavement obstacle of critical size Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 50 Issue Pages 390-404
Keywords Vision; Lighting
Abstract This paper investigates the illuminance needed to detect trip hazards for pedestrians walking after dark. In previous work, it was assumed that the critical obstacle height is 25&#8201;mm: further review of accident data and foot clearance data suggests instead that 10&#8201;mm is the critical height. Eye tracking records suggest a tendency for obstacles to be detected approximately 3.4&#8201;m ahead. Interpretation of obstacle detection data suggests horizontal photopic illuminances of up to 0.9&#8201;lux are required for peripheral detection of a 10&#8201;mm obstacle 3.4&#8201;m ahead, according to the scotopic/photopic ratio of the lighting and the age of the observer.
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Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1765
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Author (up) Sanders, D.; Gaston, K.J.
Title How ecological communities respond to artificial light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 394-400
Keywords Ecology
Abstract Many ecosystems worldwide are exposed to artificial light at night (ALAN), from streetlights and other sources, and a wide range of organisms has been shown to respond to this anthropogenic pressure. This raises concerns about the consequences for major ecosystem functions and their stability. However, there is limited understanding of how whole ecological communities respond to ALAN, and this cannot be gained simply by making predictions from observed single species physiological, behavioral, or ecological responses. Research needs to include an important building block of ecological communities, namely the interactions between species that drive ecological and evolutionary processes in ecosystems. Here, we summarize current knowledge about community responses to ALAN and illustrate different pathways and their impact on ecosystem functioning and stability. We discuss that documentation of the impact of ALAN on species interaction networks and trait distributions provides useful tools to link changes in community structure to ecosystem functions. Finally, we suggest several approaches to advance research that will link the diverse impact of ALAN to changes in ecosystems.
Address Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, Institute for Advanced Study, Berlin, Germany
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:29656458 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1857
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