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Author (up) Singhal, R. K., Kumar, M., & Bose, B.
Title Ecophysiological Responses of Artificial Night Light Pollution in Plants Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract Early in the 20th century, disparate human developmental processes culminate excess artificial light during night time and distort the phenological, physiological and ecological responses, which are sustained in the plants, animals and microorganism from millions of years. Earlier studies regarding artificial light (AL) during the night predominantly covered the drastic effects on animal systems. Although, drastic effects of AL during night time are enormous; therefore, the present topic is focused on the physiological and ecological consequences of artificial night light pollution (ANLP) on plant systems. In these consequences, most of the plant processes under ANLP are affected intensely and cause compelling changes in plant life cycle from germination to maturity. However, severe effects were observed in the case of pollination, photoreceptor signalling, flowering and microhabitats of plants. Along with drastic effects on ecology and environments, its relevance to human developmental processes cannot be avoided. Therefore, we need to equipoise between sustainable environment and steadily human development processes. Further, selection of plant/crop species, which are more responsive to ANLP, can minimize the ecological consequences of night light pollution. Likewise, changing artificial nightscape with the implication of new LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes) lightening policies like UJALA (www.ujala.gov.in), which are low cost, more durable, eco-friendly and less emitter of CO2, have potential to overcome the biodiversity threats, which arise due to old artificial lightening technology from decades. Hence, adopting new advance artificial lightening technology and understanding its impact on plant ecosystem will be a future challenge for plant biologist.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2352
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Author (up) Skandali, C.; Lambiri, Y.S.
Title Optimization of Urban Street Lighting Conditions Focusing On Energy Saving, Safety and Users’ Needs Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Contemporary Urban Affairs Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue 3 Pages 112-121
Keywords Lighting; Economics; Planning
Abstract The outdoor lighting constitutes a significant part of the night activities of people in contemporary cities. Nevertheless, in many cases, this may result in the increasing and irrational use of it affecting the users of public areas, the environment and driving safety. The subject of this paper is to extend the discussion on the subject, to provide answers and to suggest methods for the improvement of the existing conditions in urban street lighting through the use of new technologies and smart lighting management systems, with the aim of achieving a smooth relationship between the user’s needs, safety, sustainability, quality of life and energy saving.
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Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2101
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Author (up) Smith, H.M.; Neaves, L.E.; Divljan, A.
Title Predation on cicadas by an Australian Flying-fox Pteropus poliocephalus based on DNA evidence Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Australian Zoologist Abbreviated Journal Australian Zoologist
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Historically, reports of insectivory in family Pteropodidae have largely been anecdotal and thought to be an incidental corollary of flying-foxes feeding on plant products. More recent direct observations of flying-foxes catching and consuming insects, as well as advances in techniques that increase our ability to detect dietary items, suggest that this behaviour may be deliberate and more common than previously thought. Usually, multiple insects are consumed, but it appears that flying-foxes hunt and eat them one at a time. However, we have collected and photographed oral ejecta pellets under trees with high flying-fox activity, some containing evidence of multiple masticated insects. Further genetic analysis proved that these pellets came from Grey-headed Flying-foxes Pteropus poliocephalus. We propose that flying-foxes use an array of insect feeding strategies, most likely in response to variation in insect abundance and activity, as well as abiotic factors such as light and temperature.
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ISSN 0067-2238 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2148
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Author (up) Solano-Lamphar, H.A.; Kocifaj, M.
Title Numerical research on the effects the skyglow could have in phytochromes and RQE photoreceptors of plants Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage
Volume 209 Issue Pages 484-494
Keywords Plants; Skyglow
Abstract The increase of artificial light at night has a terrible impact on organisms with nightlife patterns such as a migration, nutrition, reproduction and collective interaction. Plants are not free from this issue as they have life cycle events occurring not only yearly but also daily. Such events relate to daytime variations with seasons in which the flowers of deciduous trees bloom and the leaves of certain trees fall off and change color. A response of plants to artificial light at night still remains poorly quantified; but recent scientific research suggest that skyglow can disturb plants processes. For instance, low levels of light affect deciduous plants, which shed their leaves as days grow short in the fall. In this paper we model skyglow considering the features of artificial light that can affect natural processes of plants during the night. A case-study was conducted to mimic skyglow effects in real location for which experimental data exist. In our numerical simulations we found that some lighting systems can have an effect on plant photoreceptors and affect the phenology of plants. Specifically, the lamps that emit the electromagnetic energy in a wide spectral range can have greater effect on the photosensitivity of the plants. We believe the results obtained here will motivate botanists to make a targeted experiment to verify or challenge our findings. If the night light can change plant behavior under some conditions, it can have significant implications in botany, biology, or even agriculture.
Address ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska Road 9, 845 03, Bratislava, Slovak Republic; Faculty of Mathematics, Physics, and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynska Dolina, 842 48, Bratislava, Slovakia. Electronic address: kocifaj@savba.sk
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ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:29316469 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1854
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Author (up) Souman, J.L.; Borra, T.; de Goijer, I.; Schlangen, L.J.M.; Vlaskamp, B.N.S.; Lucassen, M.P.
Title Spectral Tuning of White Light Allows for Strong Reduction in Melatonin Suppression without Changing Illumination Level or Color Temperature Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 420-431
Keywords Human Health; Lighting
Abstract Studies with monochromatic light stimuli have shown that the action spectrum for melatonin suppression exhibits its highest sensitivity at short wavelengths, around 460 to 480 nm. Other studies have demonstrated that filtering out the short wavelengths from white light reduces melatonin suppression. However, this filtering of short wavelengths was generally confounded with reduced light intensity and/or changes in color temperature. Moreover, it changed the appearance from white light to yellow/orange, rendering it unusable for many practical applications. Here, we show that selectively tuning a polychromatic white light spectrum, compensating for the reduction in spectral power between 450 and 500 nm by enhancing power at even shorter wavelengths, can produce greatly different effects on melatonin production, without changes in illuminance or color temperature. On different evenings, 15 participants were exposed to 3 h of white light with either low or high power between 450 and 500 nm, and the effects on salivary melatonin levels and alertness were compared with those during a dim light baseline. Exposure to the spectrum with low power between 450 and 500 nm, but high power at even shorter wavelengths, did not suppress melatonin compared with dim light, despite a large difference in illuminance (175 vs. <5 lux). In contrast, exposure to the spectrum with high power between 450 and 500 nm (also 175 lux) resulted in almost 50% melatonin suppression. For alertness, no significant differences between the 3 conditions were observed. These results open up new opportunities for lighting applications that allow for the use of electrical lighting without disturbance of melatonin production.
Address Philips Lighting Research, Department Lighting Applications, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
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ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:29984614 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1985
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