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Author (up) Ehrlich, D.; Schiavina, M.; Pesaresi, M.; Kemper, T.
Title Detecting spatial pattern of inequalities from remote sensing – Towards mapping of deprived communities and poverty Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication EUR 29465 EN Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages JRC113941
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Spatial inequalities across the globe are not easy to detect and satellite data have shown to be of use in this task. Earth Observation (EO) data combined with other information sources can provide complementary information to those derived from traditional methods. This research shows patterns of inequalities emerging by combining global night lights measured from Earth Observation, population density and built-up in 2015. The focus of the paper is to describe the spatial patterns that emerge by combing the three variables. This work focuses on processing EO data to derive information products, and in combining built-up- and population density with night-time lights emission. The built-up surface was derived entirely from remote sensing archives using artificial intelligence and pattern recognition techniques. The built-up was combined with population census data to derive population density. Also the night-time lights emission data were available from EO satellite sensors. The three layers are subsequently combined as three colour compositions based on the three primary colours (i.e. red, green and blue) to display the “spatial human settlement pattern” maps. These GHSL nightlights provide insights in inequalities across the globe. Many patterns seem to be associated with countries income. Typically, high income countries are very well lit at night, low income countries are poorly lit at night. All larger cities of the world are lit at night, those in low-income countries are often less well lit than cites in high-income countries. There are also important differences in nightlights emission in conflict areas, or along borders of countries. This report provides a selected number of patterns that are described at the regional, national and local scale. However, in depth analysis would be required to assess more precisely that relation between wealth access to energy and countries GDP, for example. This work also addresses regional inequality in GHSL nightlights in Slovakia. The country was selected to address the deprivation of the Roma minority community. The work aims to relate the information from the GHSL nightlights with that collected from field survey and census information conducted at the national level. Socio-economic data available at subnational level was correlated with nightlight. The analysis shows that despite the potential of GHSL nightlights in identifying deprived areas, the measurement scale of satellite derived nightlights at 375 x 375 m to 750 x 750 m pixel size is too coarse to capture the inequalities of deprived communities that occur at finer scale. In addition, in the European context, the gradient of inequality is not strong enough to produce strong evidence. Although there is a specific pattern of GHSL nightlights in settlements with high Roma presence, this cannot be used to identify such areas among the others. This work is part of the exploratory data analysis conducted within the GHSL team. The exploratory analysis will be followed by more quantitative assessments that will be available in future work.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher European Union Place of Publication Luxembourg Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-92-79-97528-8 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2821
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Author (up) El-Bakry, H.A.; Ismail, I.A.; Soliman, S.S.
Title Immunosenescence-like state is accelerated by constant light exposure and counteracted by melatonin or turmeric administration through DJ-1/Nrf2 and P53/Bax pathways Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B, Biology Abbreviated Journal J Photochem Photobiol B
Volume 186 Issue Pages 69-80
Keywords Animals
Abstract The awareness of the interrelationship between immunosenescence and constant light exposure can provide new insights into the consequences of excessive exposure to light at night due to light pollution or shift work. Here, we investigated whether constant light exposure (LL) acts as an inducer of immunosenescence. We also determined the role of melatonin or turmeric in reversing the putative effects of constant light and explored for the first time the underlying molecular mechanisms. Young (3-4-month-old) rats were exposed daily to LL alone or in combination with each of melatonin and turmeric for 12weeks. A group of aged rats (18-months old; n=6) was used as a reference for natural immunosenescence. Constant light exposure resulted in remarkable pathophysiological alterations resembling those noticed in normal aged rats, manifested as apparent decreases in antioxidant activities as well as Nrf2 and DJ-1 expressions, striking augmentation in oxidative stress, proinflammatory cytokines and expression of TNFalpha, Bax, and p53 genes, and deleterious changes of lymphoid organs, Co-administration of melatonin or turmeric was able to reverse all alterations induced by LL through upregulation of Nrf2/DJ-1 and downregulation of p53/Bax pathways. These data suggest that LL accelerates immunosenescence via oxidative stress and apoptotic pathways. They also demonstrate for the first time that turmeric is comparable to melatonin in boosting the immune function and counteracting the LL-associated immunosenescence. These effects suggest that turmeric supplementation can be used as an inexpensive intervention to prevent circadian disruption-related immunosenescence. However, to validate the effects of turmeric on humans further studies are warranted.
Address Department of Zoology & Entomology, Faculty of Science, Minia University, Egypt
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1011-1344 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30015062 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1984
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Author (up) Elvidge, C.D.; Bazilian, M.D.; Zhizhin, M.; Ghosh, T.; Baugh, K.; Hsu, F.-C.
Title The potential role of natural gas flaring in meeting greenhouse gas mitigation targets Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Energy Strategy Reviews Abbreviated Journal Energy Strategy Reviews
Volume 20 Issue Pages 156-162
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract In this paper, we compare 2015 satellite-derived natural gas (gas) flaring data with the greenhouse gas reduction targets presented by those countries in their nationally determined contributions (NDC) under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Paris Agreement. Converting from flaring to utilization is an attractive option for reducing emissions. The analysis rates the potential role of reduction of gas flaring in meeting country-specific NDC targets. The analysis includes three categories of flaring: upstream in oil and gas production areas, downstream at refineries and transport facilities, and industrial (e.g., coal mines, landfills, water treatment plants, etc.). Upstream flaring dominates with 90.6% of all flaring. Global flaring represents less than 2% of the NDC reduction target. However, most gas flaring is concentrated in a limited set of countries, leaving the possibility that flaring reduction could contribute a sizeable portion of the NDC targets for specific countries. States that could fully meet their NDC targets through gas flaring reductions include: Yemen (240%), Algeria (197%), and Iraq (136%). Countries which could meet a substantial portion of their NDC targets with gas flaring reductions include: Gabon (94%), Algeria (48%), Venezuela (47%), Iran (34%), and Sudan (33%). On the other hand, several countries with large flared gas volumes could only meet a small portion of their NDC targets from gas flaring reductions, including the Russian Federation (2.4%) and the USA (0.1%). These findings may be useful in guiding national level efforts to meet NDC greenhouse gas reduction targets.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2211467X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2055
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Author (up) Elvidge, C.D.; Ghosh, T.; Baugh, K.; Zhizhin, M.; Hsu, F.-C.; Katada, N.S.; Penalosa, W.; Hung, B.Q.
Title Rating the Effectiveness of Fishery Closures With Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Boat Detection Data Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 5 Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Fishery closures are widely used to promote the sustainability of fish stocks. Fishery agencies typically have very little data relevant to planning closure enforcement actions and evaluating the effectiveness of closures, due in part to the vast expanse and remote nature of many closures. In some cases the effectiveness of closures can be evaluated using data from GPS based beacons, such as Automatic Identification System (AIS) or Vessel Monitoring Systems (VMS) installed on fishing boats. In fisheries where few boats are equipped with AIS or VMS, the rating of closures relies on other data sources capable of detecting or inferring fishing activity. One such source comes from low light imaging data collected by the NASA/NOAA Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), which can detect fishing boats using lights to attract catch. This is a widely used practice in Asia and several other regions. NOAA has developed an automatic system for reporting the locations of VIIRS boat detections with a nominal 4 h temporal latency. VIIRS boat detection alerts are running for more than 900 fishery closures in the Philippines, with email and SMS transmission modes. These alerts are being actively used in the Philippines to plan enforcement actions and there is a growing list of apprehensions that occurred based on tip-offs from VIIRS. The VIIRS boat detection archive extends back to April 2012. A VIIRS closure index (VCI) has been developed to rate the effectiveness of closures on monthly increments in terms of a percentage. The VCI analysis was performed on three types of closures: an ad hoc fishery closure associated with a toxic industrial discharge, a seasonal fishery closure and a permanent closure in restricted coastal waters. The VCI results indicate that it is possible to rank the effectiveness of different closure, year-to-year differences in compliance levels, and to identify closure encroachments which may warrant additional enforcement effort.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2087
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Author (up) Emmer, K.M.; Russart, K.L.G.; Walker, W.H.; Nelson, R.J.; DeVries, A.C.
Title Effects of light at night on laboratory animals and research outcomes Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Behav Neurosci
Volume 132 Issue 4 Pages 302-314
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light has substantial influences on the physiology and behavior of most laboratory animals. As such, lighting conditions within animal rooms are potentially significant and often underappreciated variables within experiments. Disruption of the light/dark cycle, primarily by exposing animals to light at night (LAN), disturbs biological rhythms and has widespread physiological consequences because of mechanisms such as melatonin suppression, sympathetic stimulation, and altered circadian clock gene expression. Thus, attention to the lighting environment of laboratory animals and maintaining consistency of a light/dark cycle is imperative for study reproducibility. Light intensity, as well as wavelength, photoperiod, and timing, are all important variables. Although modern rodent facilities are designed to facilitate appropriate light cycling, there are simple ways to modify rooms to prevent extraneous light exposure during the dark period. Attention to lighting conditions of laboratory animals by both researchers and research care staff ensures best practices for maintaining animal welfare, as well as reproducibility of research results. (PsycINFO Database Record
Address Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0735-7044 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29952608 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1957
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