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Author (up) McGlashan, E.M.; Nandam, L.S.; Vidafar, P.; Mansfield, D.R.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Cain, S.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The SSRI citalopram increases the sensitivity of the human circadian system to light in an acute dose Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Psychopharmacology Abbreviated Journal Psychopharmacology (Berl)  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract RATIONALE: Disturbances of the circadian system are common in depression. Though they typically subside when depression is treated with antidepressants, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Despite being the most commonly prescribed class of antidepressants, the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on the human circadian clock is not well understood. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of the SSRI citalopram (30 mg) on the sensitivity of the human circadian system to light. METHODS: This study used a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects, crossover design. Participants completed two melatonin suppression assessments in room level light (~ 100 lx), taking either a single dose of citalopram 30 mg or a placebo at the beginning of each light exposure. Melatonin suppression was calculated by comparing placebo and citalopram light exposure conditions to a dim light baseline. RESULTS: A 47% increase in melatonin suppression was observed after administration of an acute dose of citalopram, with all participants showing more suppression after citalopram administration (large effect, d = 1.54). Further, melatonin onset occurred later under normal room light with citalopram compared to placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Increased sensitivity of the circadian system to light could assist in explaining some of the inter-individual variability in antidepressant treatment responses, as it is likely to assist in recovery in some patients, while causing further disruption for others.  
  Address Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, 18 Innovation Walk, Clayton, VIC, 3800, Australia. sean.cain@monash.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-3158 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30219986 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2012  
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Author (up) McGlashan, E.M.; Poudel, G.R.; Vidafar, P.; Drummond, S.P.A.; Cain, S.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Imaging Individual Differences in the Response of the Human Suprachiasmatic Area to Light Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front. Neurol.  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Circadian disruption is associated with poor health outcomes, including sleep and mood disorders. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus acts as the master biological clock in mammals, regulating circadian rhythms throughout the body. The clock is synchronized to the day/night cycle via retinal light exposure. The BOLD-fMRI response of the human suprachiasmatic area to light has been shown to be greater in the night than in the day, consistent with the known sensitivity of the clock to light at night. Whether the BOLD-fMRI response of the human suprachiasmatic area to light is related to a functional outcome has not been demonstrated. In a pilot study (n = 10), we investigated suprachiasmatic area activation in response to light in a 30 s block-paradigm of lights on (100 lux) and lights off (< 1 lux) using the BOLD-fMRI response, compared to each participant's melatonin suppression response to moderate indoor light (100 lux). We found a significant correlation between activation in the suprachiasmatic area in response to light in the scanner and melatonin suppression, with increased melatonin suppression being associated with increased suprachiasmatic area activation in response to the same light level. These preliminary findings are a first step toward using imaging techniques to measure individual differences in circadian light sensitivity, a measure that may have clinical relevance in understanding vulnerability in disorders that are influenced by circadian disruption.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1664-2295 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2114  
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Author (up) McKenna, H.; van der Horst, G.T.J.; Reiss, I.; Martin, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clinical chronobiology: a timely consideration in critical care medicine Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Critical Care (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Crit Care  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 124  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract A fundamental aspect of human physiology is its cyclical nature over a 24-h period, a feature conserved across most life on Earth. Organisms compartmentalise processes with respect to time in order to promote survival, in a manner that mirrors the rotation of the planet and accompanying diurnal cycles of light and darkness. The influence of circadian rhythms can no longer be overlooked in clinical settings; this review provides intensivists with an up-to-date understanding of the burgeoning field of chronobiology, and suggests ways to incorporate these concepts into daily practice to improve patient outcomes. We outline the function of molecular clocks in remote tissues, which adjust cellular and global physiological function according to the time of day, and the potential clinical advantages to keeping in time with them. We highlight the consequences of “chronopathology”, when this harmony is lost, and the risk factors for this condition in critically ill patients. We introduce the concept of “chronofitness” as a new target in the treatment of critical illness: preserving the internal synchronisation of clocks in different tissues, as well as external synchronisation with the environment. We describe methods for monitoring circadian rhythms in a clinical setting, and how this technology may be used for identifying optimal time windows for interventions, or to alert the physician to a critical deterioration of circadian rhythmicity. We suggest a chronobiological approach to critical illness, involving multicomponent strategies to promote chronofitness (chronobundles), and further investment in the development of personalised, time-based treatment for critically ill patients.  
  Address Critical Care Unit, Royal Free Hospital, Pond Street, London, NW3 2QG, UK. daniel.martin@ucl.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1364-8535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29747699 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1897  
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Author (up) McLay, L.K.; Nagarajan-Radha, V.; Green, M.P.; Jones, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim artificial light at night affects mating, reproductive output, and reactive oxygen species in Drosophila melanogaster Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 419-428  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Humans are lighting the night-time environment with ever increasing extent and intensity, resulting in a variety of negative ecological effects in individuals and populations. Effects of light at night on reproductive fitness traits are demonstrated across taxa however, the mechanisms underlying these effects are largely untested. One possible mechanism is that light at night may result in perturbed reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress levels. Here, we reared Drosophila melanogaster under either dim (10 lx) light or no light (0 lx) at night for three generations and then compared mating and lifetime oviposition patterns. In a second experiment, we explored whether exposure to light at night treatments resulted in variation in ROS levels in the heads and ovaries of six, 23- and 36-day-old females. We demonstrate that dim light at night affects mating and reproductive output: 10 lx flies courted for longer prior to mating, and female oviposition patterns differed to 0 lx females. ROS levels were lower in the ovaries but not heads, of 10 lx compared with 0 lx females. We suggest that reduced ROS levels may reflect changes in ovarian physiology and cell signaling, which may be related to the differences observed in oviposition patterns. Taken together, our results indicate negative consequences for invertebrates under more stressful, urban, lit conditions and further investigation into the mechanisms driving these changes is warranted to manage invertebrate communities in a brighter future.  
  Address School of BioSciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29733537 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1889  
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Author (up) McMahon, D.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Illuminating the Enlightenment: Public Lighting Practices in the Siècle Des Lumières* Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Past & Present Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 240 Issue 1 Pages 119-159  
  Keywords History; Psychology  
  Abstract This article explores the relationship between the Enlightenment as a cultural and intellectual phenomenon and actual illumination in the long 18th century. Focused on street lighting in Paris, it nonetheless seeks to situate the French case in the broader context of developments in public lighting in the French provinces, Europe, and the Atlantic World. In the concerted effort to illuminate dark streets, the Enlightenment was operationalized in ways that bore fundamentally on commerce, sociability, and perceptions of progress, enlightened government, and enlightened space. At the same time, the attempt to illuminate formerly dark spaces generated reactions. A ‘dialectic of illumination’ was the counterpart to the dialectic of Enlightenment, fostering resistance to the new regime of light and its efforts to impose, through human ingenuity and instrumental reason, greater security and social control.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-2746 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1972  
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