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Author (up) Du, M.; Wang, L.; Zou, S.; Shi, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modeling the Census Tract Level Housing Vacancy Rate with the Jilin1-03 Satellite and Other Geospatial Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 10 Issue 12 Pages 1920  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The vacant house is an essential phenomenon of urban decay and population loss. Exploration of the correlations between housing vacancy and some socio-environmental factors is conducive to understanding the mechanism of urban shrinking and revitalization. In recent years, rapidly developing night-time remote sensing, which has the ability to detect artificial lights, has been widely applied in applications associated with human activities. Current night-time remote sensing studies on housing vacancy rates are limited by the coarse spatial resolution of data. The launch of the Jilin1-03 satellite, which carried a high spatial resolution (HSR) night-time imaging camera, provides a new supportive data source. In this paper, we examined this new high spatial resolution night-time light dataset in housing vacancy rate estimation. Specifically, a stepwise multivariable linear regression model was engaged to estimate the housing vacancy rate at a very fine scale, the census tract level. Three types of variables derived from geospatial data and night-time image represent the physical environment, landuse (LU) structure, and human activities, respectively. The linear regression models were constructed and analyzed. The analysis results show that (1) the HVRs estimating model using the Jilin1-03 satellite and other ancillary geospatial data fits well with the Census statistical data (adjusted R2 = 0.656, predicted R2 = 0.603, RMSE = 0.046) and thus is a valid estimation model; (2) the Jilin1-03 satellite night-time data contributed a 28% (from 0.510 to 0.656) fitting accuracy increase and a 68% (from 0.359 to 0.603) predicting accuracy increase in the estimate model of the housing vacancy rate. Reflecting socio-economic conditions, the luminous intensity of commercial areas derived from the Jilin1-03 satellite is the most influential variable to housing vacancy. Land use structure indirectly and partially demonstrated that the social environment factors in the community have strong correlations with residential vacancy. Moreover, the physical environment factor, which depicts vegetation conditions in the residential areas, is also a significant indicator of housing vacancy. In conclusion, the emergence of HSR night light data opens a new door to future microscopic scale study within cities.  
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  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2124  
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Author (up) Dunster, G.P.; de la Iglesia, L.; Ben-Hamo, M.; Nave, C.; Fleischer, J.G.; Panda, S.; de la Iglesia, H.O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleepmore in Seattle: Later school start times are associated with more sleep and better performance in high school students Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Sci. Adv.  
  Volume 4 Issue 12 Pages eaau6200  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Most teenagers are chronically sleep deprived. One strategy proposed to lengthen adolescent sleep is to delay secondary school start times. This would allow students to wake up later without shifting their bedtime, which is biologically determined by the circadian clock, resulting in a net increase in sleep. So far, there is no objective quantitative data showing that a single intervention such as delaying the school start time significantly increases daily sleep. The Seattle School District delayed the secondary school start time by nearly an hour. We carried out a pre-/post-research study and show that there was an increase in the daily median sleep duration of 34 min, associated with a 4.5% increase in the median grades of the students and an improvement in attendance.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2131  
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Author (up) Duriscoe, D.M.; Anderson, S.J.; Luginbuhl, C.B.; Baugh, K.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A simplified model of all-sky artificial sky glow derived from VIIRS Day/Night band data Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 214 Issue Pages 133-145  
  Keywords Skyglow; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract We present a simplified method using geographic analysis tools to predict the average artificial luminance over the hemisphere of the night sky, expressed as a ratio to the natural condition. The VIIRS Day/Night Band upward radiance data from the Suomi NPP orbiting satellite was used for input to the model. The method is based upon a relation between sky glow brightness and the distance from the observer to the source of upward radiance. This relationship was developed using a Garstang radiative transfer model with Day/Night Band data as input, then refined and calibrated with ground-based all-sky V-band photometric data taken under cloudless and low atmospheric aerosol conditions. An excellent correlation was found between observed sky quality and the predicted values from the remotely sensed data. Thematic maps of large regions of the earth showing predicted artificial V-band sky brightness may be quickly generated with modest computing resources. We have found a fast and accurate method based on previous work to model all-sky quality. We provide limitations to this method. The proposed model meets requirements needed by decision makers and land managers of an easy to interpret and understand metric of sky quality.  
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  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1879  
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Author (up) Durrant, J.; Botha, L.M.; Green, M.P.; Jones, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night prolongs juvenile development time in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool B Mol Dev Evol  
  Volume 330 Issue 4 Pages 225-233  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract A growing body of evidence exists to support a detrimental effect of the presence of artificial light at night (ALAN) on life-history and fitness traits. However, few studies simultaneously investigate multiple traits and the life stages at which changes manifest. We experimentally manipulated ALAN intensities, within those found in the natural environment, to explore the consequences for growth, survival, and reproductive success of the field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. We reared crickets from egg to adult under a daily light-cycle consisting of 12 hr bright daylight (2,600 lx) followed by either 12 hr darkness (0 lx) or dim-light environments (1, 10, or 100 lx). We found egg hatch, adult survival, and reproductive measures were largely comparable for all treatments. However, juvenile development time (number of days from egg to adult) was on average 10 days (14%) longer and adults were also larger when crickets were exposed to any light at night (1, 10, or 100 lx). Our data demonstrate that chronic lifetime exposure to ALAN can modulate the timing of life-history events and may disrupt phenology to a similar extent as other abiotic factors.  
  Address The School of BioSciences, Faculty of Science, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1552-5007 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:29862646 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1925  
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Author (up) Dutta, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Insights into the impacts of three current environmental problems on Amphibians Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication European Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 4 Issue 2 Pages 15-27  
  Keywords Review; Animals  
  Abstract Global warming, light pollution and noise are common human-induced environmental problems that are escalating at a high rate. Their consequences on wildlife have mostly been overlooked, with the exception of a few species with respect to climate change. The problems often occur simultaneously and exert their negative effects together at the same time. In other words, their impacts are combined. Studies have never focused on more than one problem, and so, such combined effects have never been understood properly. The review addresses this lacuna in the case of amphibians, which are a highly vulnerable group. It divides the overall impacts of the problems into seven categories (behaviour, health, movement, distribution, phenology, development and reproductive success) and then assesses their combined impact through statistical analyses. It revealed that amphibian calling is the most vulnerable aspect to the combined impacts. This could provide important input for conservation of amphibians.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1339-8474 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2166  
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