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Author (up) Hüppop, O.; Ciach, M.; Diehl, R.; Reynolds, D.R.; Stepanian, P.M.; Menz, M.H.M.
Title Perspectives and challenges for the use of radar in biological conservation Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ecography Abbreviated Journal Ecography
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Review
Abstract Radar is at the forefront for the study of broad‐scale aerial movements of birds, bats and insects and related issues in biological conservation. Radar techniques are especially useful for investigating species which fly at high altitudes, in darkness, or which are too small for applying electronic tags. Here, we present an overview of radar applications in biological conservation and highlight its future possibilities. Depending on the type of radar, information can be gathered on local‐ to continental‐scale movements of airborne organisms and their behaviour. Such data can quantify flyway usage, biomass and nutrient transport (bioflow), population sizes, dynamics and distributions, times and dimensions of movements, areas and times of mass emergence and swarming, habitat use and activity ranges. Radar also captures behavioural responses to anthropogenic disturbances, artificial light and man‐made structures. Weather surveillance and other long‐range radar networks allow spatially broad overviews of important stopover areas, songbird mass roosts and emergences from bat caves. Mobile radars, including repurposed marine radars and commercially dedicated ‘bird radars’, offer the ability to track and monitor the local movements of individuals or groups of flying animals. Harmonic radar techniques have been used for tracking short‐range movements of insects and other small animals of conservation interest. However, a major challenge in aeroecology is determining the taxonomic identity of the targets, which often requires ancillary data obtained from other methods. Radar data have become a global source of information on ecosystem structure, composition, services and function and will play an increasing role in the monitoring and conservation of flying animals and threatened habitats worldwide.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2204
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Author (up) Ivajnsic, D., & Žiberna, I.
Title Daljinsko zaznavanje svetlobne onesnaženosti v Sloveniji / Remote sensing of light polution in Slovenia Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Revija za geografijo Abbreviated Journal
Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 113-132
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Izvleček

Daljinsko zaznavanje svetlobne onesnaženosti v Sloveniji

V članku so predstavljeni rezultati analize svetlobne onesnaženosti na območju Slovenije v obdobju 2013-2017. Podatki so pridobljeni s satelita Suomi NPP, ki snema površje Zemlje tudi v nočnem kanalu. Prikazani so rezultati svetlobne onesnaženosti po občinah in trendi svetlobne onesnaženosti v omenjenem obdobju. Posebej so izpostavljena območja z zelo visokimi in nizkimi vrednostmi svetlobne onesnaženosti.

Abstract

Remote sensing of light pollution in Slovenia

The study deals with the problem of light pollution in Slovenia in the period 2013-2017. Remotely sensed data were obtained from the Suomi NPP satellite, which is scanning the earth's surface at night. The findings and geospatial trends of light pollution in the mentioned time period are discussed on the national and municipal levels. Some areas with very high and low levels of light pollution were exposed.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Slovenian Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2343
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Author (up) Jan Stenvers, D.; Scheer, F.A.J.L.; Schrauwen, P.; la Fleur, S.E.; Kalsbeek, A.
Title Circadian clocks and insulin resistance Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Reviews. Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Nat Rev Endocrinol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract Insulin resistance is a main determinant in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The circadian timing system consists of a central brain clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and various peripheral tissue clocks. The circadian timing system is responsible for the coordination of many daily processes, including the daily rhythm in human glucose metabolism. The central clock regulates food intake, energy expenditure and whole-body insulin sensitivity, and these actions are further fine-tuned by local peripheral clocks. For instance, the peripheral clock in the gut regulates glucose absorption, peripheral clocks in muscle, adipose tissue and liver regulate local insulin sensitivity, and the peripheral clock in the pancreas regulates insulin secretion. Misalignment between different components of the circadian timing system and daily rhythms of sleep-wake behaviour or food intake as a result of genetic, environmental or behavioural factors might be an important contributor to the development of insulin resistance. Specifically, clock gene mutations, exposure to artificial light-dark cycles, disturbed sleep, shift work and social jet lag are factors that might contribute to circadian disruption. Here, we review the physiological links between circadian clocks, glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, and present current evidence for a relationship between circadian disruption and insulin resistance. We conclude by proposing several strategies that aim to use chronobiological knowledge to improve human metabolic health.
Address Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN), Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), Amsterdam, Netherlands. a.kalsbeek@nin.knaw.nl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1759-5029 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30531917 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2133
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Author (up) Jechow, A.; Ribas, S.J.; Domingo, R.C.; Hölker, F.; Kolláth, Z.; Kyba, C.C.M.
Title Tracking the dynamics of skyglow with differential photometry using a digital camera with fisheye lens Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume 209 Issue Pages 212-223
Keywords Skyglow; Instrumentation
Abstract rtificial skyglow is dynamic due to changing atmospheric conditions and the switching on and off of artificial lights throughout the night. Street lights as well as the ornamental illumination of historical sites and buildings are sometimes switched off at a certain time to save energy. Ornamental lights in particular are often directed upwards, and can therefore have a major contribution towards brightening of the night sky. Here we use differential photometry to investigate the change in night sky brightness and illuminance during an automated regular switch-off of ornamental light in the town of Balaguer and an organized switch-off of all public lights in the village of Àger, both near Montsec Astronomical Park in Spain. The sites were observed during two nights with clear and cloudy conditions using a DSLR camera and a fisheye lens. A time series of images makes it possible to track changes in lighting conditions and sky brightness simultaneously. During the clear night, the ornamental lights in Balaguer contribute over 20% of the skyglow at zenith at the observational site. Furthermore, we are able to track very small changes in the ground illuminance on a cloudy night near Àger.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1807
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Author (up) Jiang, W.; He, G.; Leng, W.; Long, T.; Wang, G.; Liu, H.; Peng, Y.; Yin, R.; Guo, H.
Title Characterizing Light Pollution Trends across Protected Areas in China Using Nighttime Light Remote Sensing Data Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi
Volume 7 Issue 7 Pages 243
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Protected areas (PAs) with natural, ecological, and cultural value play important roles related to biological processes, biodiversity, and ecosystem services. Over the past four decades, the spatial range and intensity of light pollution in China has experienced an unprecedented increase. Few studies have been documented on the light pollution across PAs in China, especially in regions that provide a greater amount of important biodiversity conservation. Here, nighttime light satellite images from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) were selected to characterize light pollution trends across PAs using nighttime light indexes and hot spot analysis, and then the light pollution changes in PAs were classified. Furthermore, the causes of light pollution changes in PAs were determined using high-resolution satellite images and statistical data. The results showed the following: (1) Approximately 57.30% of PAs had an increasing trend from 1992 to 2012, and these PAs were mainly located in the eastern region, the central region, and a small part of the western region of China. Hot spot analysis showed that the patterns of change for the total night light and night light mean had spatial agglomeration characteristics; (2) The PAs affected by light pollution changes were divided into eight classes, of which PAs with stable trends accounted for 41%, and PAs with high increasing trends accounted for 10%. PAs that had high increasing trends with low density accounted for the smallest amount, i.e., only 1%; (3) The factors influencing light pollution changes in PAs included the distance to urban areas, mineral exploitation, and tourism development and the migration of residents. Finally, based on the status of light pollution encroachment into PAs, strategies to control light pollution and enhance the sustainable development of PAs are recommended.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2220-9964 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1952
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