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Author (up) Souman, J.L.; Tinga, A.M.; Te Pas, S.F.; van Ee, R.; Vlaskamp, B.N.S.
Title Acute alerting effects of light: a systematic literature review Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res
Volume 337 Issue Pages 228-239
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Periodic, well timed exposure to light is important for our health and wellbeing. Light, in particular in the blue part of the spectrum, is thought to affect alertness both indirectly, by modifying circadian rhythms, and directly, giving rise to acute effects. We performed a systematic review of empirical studies on direct, acute effects of light on alertness to evaluate the reliability of these effects and to assess to what extent they depend on other factors, such as time of day, exposure duration and sleep pressure. In total, we identified 74 studies in which either light intensity, spectral distribution, or both were manipulated, and the effects on behavioral measures of alertness were evaluated, either subjectively or measured in performance tasks. The results show that increasing the intensity or the color temperature of polychromatic white light in general has been found to increase subjective ratings of alertness, though a substantial proportion of these studies failed to find significant effects. There is little evidence in the literature that these subjective alerting effects of light also translate into improvements on performance measures of alertness. For monochromatic or narrowband light exposure, some studies have shown improvement in reaction time tasks with exposure to blue light, but generally this was not accompanied by changes in subjective alertness. Thus, the alerting effects of light are far less clear than often suggested. We suggest that in future studies more attention should be paid to other factors that may influence the effects of light, such as chronotype, circadian phase, homeostatic state and prior light history.
Address Philips Research (Department Brain, Behavior & Cognition), Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28912014 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1727
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Author (up) Spoelstra, K.; Ramakers, J.J.C.; van Dis, N.E.; Visser, M.E.
Title No effect of artificial light of different colors on commuting Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii) in a choice experiment Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 506-510
Keywords Animals
Abstract Progressive illumination at night poses an increasing threat to species worldwide. Light at night is particularly problematic for bats as most species are nocturnal and often cross relatively large distances when commuting between roosts and foraging grounds. Earlier studies have shown that illumination of linear structures in the landscape disturbs commuting bats, and that the response of bats to light may strongly depend on the light spectrum. Here, we studied the impact of white, green, and red light on commuting Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii). We used a unique location where commuting bats cross a road by flying through two identical, parallel culverts underneath. We illuminated the culverts with white, red, and green light, with an intensity of 5 lux at the water surface. Bats had to choose between the two culverts, each with a different lighting condition every night. We presented all paired combinations of white, green, and red light and dark control in a factorial design. Contrary to our expectations, the number of bat passes through a culvert was unaffected by the presence of light. Furthermore, bats did not show any preference for light color. These results show that the response of commuting Daubenton's bats to different colors of light at night with a realistic intensity may be limited when passing through culverts.
Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29808964 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1927
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Author (up) Spoelstra, K.; Verhagen, I.; Meijer, D.; Visser, M.E.
Title Artificial light at night shifts daily activity patterns but not the internal clock in the great tit (Parus major) Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci
Volume 285 Issue 1875 Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night has shown a dramatic increase over the last decades and continues to increase. Light at night can have strong effects on the behaviour and physiology of species, which includes changes in the daily timing of activity; a clear example is the advance in dawn song onset in songbirds by low levels of light at night. Although such effects are often referred to as changes in circadian timing, i.e. changes to the internal clock, two alternative mechanisms are possible. First, light at night can change the timing of clock controlled activity, without any change to the clock itself; e.g. by a change in the phase relation between the circadian clock and expression of activity. Second, changes in daily activity can be a direct response to light ('masking'), without any involvement of the circadian system. Here, we studied whether the advance in onset of activity by dim light at night in great tits (Parus major) is indeed attributable to a phase shift of the internal clock. We entrained birds to a normal light/dark (LD) cycle with bright light during daytime and darkness at night, and to a comparable (LDim) schedule with dim light at night. The dim light at night strongly advanced the onset of activity of the birds. After at least six days in LD or LDim, we kept birds in constant darkness (DD) by leaving off all lights so birds would revert to their endogenous, circadian system controlled timing of activity. We found that the timing of onset in DD was not dependent on whether the birds were kept at LD or LDim before the measurement. Thus, the advance of activity under light at night is caused by a direct effect of light rather than a phase shift of the internal clock. This demonstrates that birds are capable of changing their daily activity to low levels of light at night directly, without the need to alter their internal clock.
Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), PO Box 50, 6700 AB Wageningen, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29593108 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1830
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Author (up) Stafstrom, J.A.; Hebets, E.A.
Title Male attraction to female airborne cues by the net-casting spider, Deinopis spinosa Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behav Processes
Volume 159 Issue Pages 23-30
Keywords Animals
Abstract For many animals, finding a mate can be a difficult task. For males, it often involves actively searching for conspecific females, sometimes over great distances. This mate-searching can be aided through chemical or visual signals or cues produced by sexually receptive females. Here, we investigate the roles of olfaction and vision in mate-searching in a strictly nocturnal net-casting spider, Deinopis spinosa. First, we used an olfactometer assay to determine if mature male D. spinosa respond to conspecific airborne cues. We found that mature males, but not mature females, were attracted to airborne cues of mature female conspecifics. We next investigated the relative importance of olfaction and vision in male mate-searching. While manipulating airflow and light levels in screened enclosures in the laboratory, we tested freely moving mature males for mate-searching success. We found no effect of our airflow treatment on mate-searching success. Light levels, however, affected mate-searching in an unexpected way – males were more likely to locate females in complete darkness when compared to dim-light conditions. Our results suggest that visual cues are not necessary for successful male mate-searching in D. spinosa, but that the visual environment can nonetheless influence male behavior. In summary, we provide evidence suggesting that airborne cues, but not visual cues, are important in D. spinosa male mate-searching efforts, though the source of these chemical airborne cues remains unknown.
Address University of Nebraska – Lincoln, School of Biological Sciences, NE, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0376-6357 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30562562 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2152
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Author (up) Stathakis, D.; Baltas, P.
Title Seasonal population estimates based on night-time lights Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Computers, Environment and Urban Systems Abbreviated Journal Computers, Environment and Urban Systems
Volume 68 Issue Pages 133-141
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The objective of this paper is to present a method for estimating seasonally specific ambient population counts. The central assumption is that the variation in observed night-lights is a valid proxy for ambient population. Island populations are used for validation, where it is possible to derive estimates of ambient population from national statistics. The method is then applied to the whole of Greece. The validation shows a strong correlation amongst night-lights derived estimates and the reference dataset. Based on the proposed method, national maps are produced showing the month when seasonality is in its peak, the peak value during that month and the overall length of the season, in terms of how many months exceed a certain threshold. Different seasonality patterns are revealed. An advantage of the proposed method, compared to other contemporary approaches, is that it is based on public domain, global data.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0198-9715 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2177
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