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Author (up) Farnworth, B.; Innes, J.; Kelly, C.; Littler, R.; Waas, J.R.
Title Photons and foraging: Artificial light at night generates avoidance behaviour in male, but not female, New Zealand weta Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut
Volume 236 Issue Pages 82-90
Keywords Animals
Abstract Avoiding foraging under increased predation risk is a common anti-predator behaviour. Using artificial light to amplify predation risk at ecologically valuable sites has been proposed to deter introduced mice (Mus musculus) and ship rats (Rattus rattus) from degrading biodiversity in island ecosystems. However, light may adversely affect native species; in particular, little is known about invertebrate responses to altered lighting regimes. We investigated how endemic orthopterans responded to artificial light at Maungatautari Ecological Island (Waikato, New Zealand). We predicted that based on their nocturnal behaviour, ecology and evolutionary history, tree weta (Hemideina thoracica) and cave weta (Rhaphidophoridae) would reduce their activity under illumination. Experimental stations (n=15) experienced three evenings under each treatment (order randomised): (a) light (illuminated LED fixture), (b) dark (unilluminated LED fixture) and (c) baseline (no lighting fixture). Weta visitation rates were analysed from images captured on infra-red trail cameras set up at each station. Light significantly reduced the number of observations of cave (71.7% reduction) and tree weta (87.5% reduction). In observations where sex was distinguishable (53% of all visits), male tree weta were observed significantly more often (85% of visits) than females (15% of visits) and while males avoided illuminated sites, no detectable difference was observed across treatments for females. Sex could not be distinguished for cave weta. Our findings have implications for the use of light as a novel pest management strategy, and for the conservation of invertebrate diversity and abundance within natural and urban ecosystems worldwide that may be affected by light pollution.
Address Biological Sciences, School of Science, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton, New Zealand. Electronic address: waasur@waikato.ac.nz
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ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:29414377 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1856
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Author (up) Fehrer, D.; Krarti, M.
Title Spatial distribution of building energy use in the United States through satellite imagery of the earth at night Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment
Volume 142 Issue Pages 252-264
Keywords remote sensing
Abstract Despite the importance of geospatial analysis of energy use in buildings, the data available for such exercises is limited. A potential solution is to use geospatial information, such as that obtained from satellites, to disaggregate building energy use data to a more useful scale. Many researchers have used satellite imagery to estimate the extent of human activities, including building energy use and population distribution. Much of the reported work has been carried out in rapidly developing countries such as India and China where urban development is dynamic and not always easy to measure. In countries with less rapid urbanization, such as the United States, there is still value in using satellite imagery to estimate building energy use for the purposes of identifying energy efficiency opportunities and planning electricity transmission. This study evaluates nighttime light imagery obtained from the VIIRS instrument aboard the SUOMI NPP satellite as a predictor of building energy use intensity within states, counties, and cities in the United States. It is found that nighttime lights can explain upwards of 90% of the variability in energy consumption in the United States, depending on conditions and geospatial scale. The results of this research are used to generate electricity and fuel consumption maps of the United States with a resolution of less than 200 square meters. The methodologies undertaken in this study can be replicated globally to create more opportunities for geospatial energy analysis without the hurdles often associated with disaggregated building energy use data collection.
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ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1938
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Author (up) Figura, J.; Haughwout, C.; Cahoy, K.; Welle, R.; Hardy, B.; Pack, D.; Bosh, A.
Title Initial Demonstration of an Uplink LED Beacon to a Low Earth Orbiting CubeSat Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Small Satellites Abbreviated Journal
Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 719-732
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract In this study, an uplink light-emitting diode (LED) beacon that can enable a CubeSat to locate a laser communication ground station was designed, constructed, and tested, and detection of the beacon from low Earth orbit (LEO) with a CMOS camera on the AeroCube-5 CubeSat was demonstrated. The LED beacon described is an alternative to the near-infrared laser beacons commonly used in laser communication systems, and has the potential to be cheaper, easier to point, and to require less regulatory coordination than a laser beacon, while performing the same function. An optical design is detailed, consisting of an array of 80 green LEDs with a center wavelength of 528 nm, producing 15.9 watts of free-space optical power, focused to a beamwidth of 8.12 degrees full-widthhalf-max (FWHM). A link budget is presented that shows the beacon is detectable by a CubeSat-mounted camera with a 7.9 mm diameter aperture and a silicon CMOS detector. A prototype beacon comprised of an LED array, focusing optics, thermal control, and tracking mechanisms was designed and constructed, and laboratory measurements of the beam profile and optical power of the prototype beacon using an optical power meter are presented herein. A field test is also described, in which the beacon was deployed at Wallace Astrophysical Observatory in the early morning of May 15, 2017 and imaged with a camera on AeroCube-5. The array is successfully identified in a sequence of five images taken by the CubeSat, demonstrating the viability of LED uplink beacons with CubeSat imagers.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2108
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Author (up) Firebaugh, A.; Haynes, K.J.
Title Light pollution may create demographic traps for nocturnal insects Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Basic and Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal Basic and Applied Ecology
Volume 34 Issue Pages 118-125
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution impacts both intra- and inter-specific interactions, such as interactions between mates and predator–prey interactions. In mobile organisms attracted to artificial lights, the effect of light pollution on these interactions may be intensified. If organisms are repelled by artificial lights, effects of light pollution on intra- and inter-specific interactions may be diminished as organisms move away. However, organisms repelled by artificial lights would likely lose suitable habitat as light pollution expands. Thus, we investigated how light pollution affects both net attraction or repulsion of organisms and effects on intra- and inter-specific interactions. In manipulative field studies using fireflies, we found that Photuris versicolor and Photinus pyralis fireflies were lured to artificial (LED) light at night and that both species were less likely to engage in courtship dialogues (bioluminescent flashing) in light-polluted field plots. Light pollution also lowered the mating success of P. pyralis. P. versicolor is known to prey upon P. pyralis by mimicking the flash patterns of P. pyralis, but we did not find an effect of light pollution on Photuris–Photinus predator–prey interactions. Our study suggests, that for some nocturnal insects, light-polluted areas may act as demographic traps, i.e., areas where immigration exceeds emigration and inhibition of courtship dialogues and mating reduces reproduction. Examining multiple factors affecting population growth in concert is needed to understand and mitigate impacts of light pollution on wildlife.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1439-1791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1978
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Author (up) Flores, D.E.F.L.; Oda, G.A.
Title Novel Light/Dark Regimens with Minimum Light Promote Circadian Disruption: Simulations with a Model Oscillator Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial lab manipulation of LD cycles has enabled simulations of the disruptive conditions found in modern human societies, such as jet-lag, night-work and light at night. New techniques using animal models have been developed, and these can greatly improve our understanding of circadian disruption. Some of these techniques, such as in vivo bioluminescence assays, require minimum external light. This requirement is challenging because the usual lighting protocols applied in circadian desynchronization experiments rely on considerable light input. Here, we present a novel LD regimen that can disrupt circadian rhythms with little light per day, based on computer simulations of a model limit-cycle oscillator. The model predicts that a single light pulse per day has the potential to disturb rhythmicity when pulse times are randomly distributed within an interval. Counterintuitively, the rhythm still preserves an underlying 24-h periodicity when this interval is as large as 14 h, indicating that day/night cues are still detectable. Only when pulses are spread throughout the whole 24-h day does the rhythm lose any day-to-day period correlation. In addition, the model also reveals that stronger pulses of brighter light should exacerbate the disrupting effects. We propose the use of this LD schedule-which would be compatible with the requirements of in vivo bioluminescence assays-to help understand circadian disruption and associated illnesses.
Address Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
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ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:30595077 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2146
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