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Author (up) Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bedroom Light Exposure at Night and the Incidence of Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study of the HEIJO-KYO Cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages 427-434  
  Keywords Human Health; Mental Health; indoor light; geriatrics; Sleep; Sleep Disorders  
  Abstract Previous studies have indicated that minimal exposure to light at night (LAN) increases depression risk, even at 5 lux, in nocturnal and diurnal mammals. Although such low-level LAN may affect human circadian physiology, the association between exposure to LAN and depressive symptoms remains uncertain. In the present study, bedroom light intensity was measured objectively, and depressive symptoms were assessed, during 2010-2014 in Nara, Japan. Of 863 participants (mean age = 71.5 years) who did not have depressive symptoms at baseline, 73 participants reported development of depressive symptoms during follow-up (median, 24 months). Compared with the “dark” group (average of <5 lux; n = 710), the LAN group (average of >/=5 lux; n = 153) exhibited a significantly higher depression risk (hazard ratio = 1.89; 95% CI: 1.13, 3.14), according to a Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and economic status. Further, the significance remained in a multivariable model adjusting for hypertension, diabetes, and sleep parameters (hazard ratio = 1.72; 95% CI: 1.03, 2.89). Sensitivity analyses using bedroom light data with a cutoff value of >/=10 lux suggested consistent results. In conclusion, these results indicated that exposure to LAN in home settings was independently associated with subsequent depression risk in an elderly general population.  
  Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, 840 Shijocho, Kashiharashi, Nara 634-8521, Japan; e-mail: obayashi(at)naramed-u.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28992236 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1815  
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Author (up) Oozeki, Y.; Inagake, D.; Saito, T.; Okazaki, M.; Fusejima, I.; Hotai, M.; Watanabe, T.; Sugisaki, H.; Miyahara, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reliable estimation of IUU fishing catch amounts in the northwestern Pacific adjacent to the Japanese EEZ: Potential for usage of satellite remote sensing images Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Marine Policy Abbreviated Journal Marine Policy  
  Volume 88 Issue Pages 64-74  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract To establish an estimation procedure for reliable catch amount of illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing, light-gathering fishing operations in the northwestern Pacific were analyzed based on the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) day/night band (DNB) data provided by the Suomi National Polar Partnership (SNPP) satellite. The estimated fishing activities were compared with the navigation tracks of vessels obtained from the automatic identification system (AIS). As a model case, the fishing activities of Chinese fishing boats using fish aggregation lights outside the Japanese EEZ in the northwestern Pacific were analyzed from mid-June to early-September 2016. Integration analyses of VIIRS DNB data and AIS information provided reliable data for estimating the fishing activities of Chinese fishing boats and suggested the importance of estimating fish carrier ship movements. The total amount of the chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus) catch during this period was independently estimated from three angles: 1) the fishing capacity of the fishing boats, 2) the freezing capacity of refrigeration factory ships and 3) the fish hold capacity of the fish carrier ships, based on information obtained from interviews with Chinese fisheries companies. These estimates indicated that the total amount of mackerel catch by Chinese fisheries was more than 80% of the allowable biological catch (ABC) of Japan in this area in 2016. This suggests that Pacific high seas fishing has a significant impact on the future of fish abundance. Our proposed procedure raises the possibility of evaluating the fishing impact of some forms of IUU fisheries independently from conventional statistical reports.  
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  ISSN 0308597X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2179  
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Author (up) Ostrin, L.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ocular and systemic melatonin and the influence of light exposure Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Clinical & Experimental Optometry Abbreviated Journal Clin Exp Optom  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Vision; Review; Human Health  
  Abstract Melatonin is a neurohormone known to modulate a wide range of circadian functions, including sleep. The synthesis and release of melatonin from the pineal gland is heavily influenced by light stimulation of the retina, particularly through the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. Melatonin is also synthesised within the eye, although to a much lesser extent than in the pineal gland. Melatonin acts directly on ocular structures to mediate a variety of diurnal rhythms and physiological processes within the eye. The interactions between melatonin, the eye, and visual function have been the subject of a considerable body of recent research. This review is intended to provide a broad introduction for eye-care practitioners and researchers to the topic of melatonin and the eye. The first half of the review describes the anatomy and physiology of melatonin production: how visual inputs affect the pineal production of melatonin; how melatonin is involved in a variety of diurnal rhythms within the eye, including photoreceptor disc shedding, neuronal sensitivity, and intraocular pressure control; and melatonin production and physiological roles in retina, ciliary body, lens and cornea. The second half of the review describes clinical implications of light/melatonin interactions. These include light exposure and photoreceptor contributions in melatonin suppression, leading to consideration of how blue blockers, cataract, and light therapy might affect sleep and mood in patients. Additionally, the interactions between melatonin, sleep and refractive error development are discussed. A better understanding of environmental factors that affect melatonin and subsequent effects on physiological processes will allow clinicians to develop treatments and recommend modifiable behaviours to improve sleep, increase daytime alertness, and regulate ocular and systemic processes related to melatonin.  
  Address University of Houston College of Optometry, Houston, Texas, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0816-4622 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30074278 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1986  
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Author (up) Ouyang, J.Q.; Davies, S.; Dominoni, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Hormonally mediated effects of artificial light at night on behavior and fitness: linking endocrine mechanisms with function Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Experimental Biology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Biol  
  Volume 221 Issue Pt 6 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Alan; Glucocorticoid; Hormones; Light pollution; Melatonin; Metabolism; Sleep; Stress; Thyroid; Urban ecology  
  Abstract Alternation between day and night is a predictable environmental fluctuation that organisms use to time their activities. Since the invention of artificial lighting, this predictability has been disrupted and continues to change in a unidirectional fashion with increasing urbanization. As hormones mediate individual responses to changing environments, endocrine systems might be one of the first systems affected, as well as being the first line of defense to ameliorate any negative health impacts. In this Review, we first highlight how light can influence endocrine function in vertebrates. We then focus on four endocrine axes that might be affected by artificial light at night (ALAN): pineal, reproductive, adrenal and thyroid. Throughout, we highlight key findings, rather than performing an exhaustive review, in order to emphasize knowledge gaps that are hindering progress on proposing impactful and concrete plans to ameliorate the negative effects of ALAN. We discuss these findings with respect to impacts on human and animal health, with a focus on the consequences of anthropogenic modification of the night-time environment for non-human organisms. Lastly, we stress the need for the integration of field and lab experiments as well as the need for long-term integrative eco-physiological studies in the rapidly expanding field of light pollution.  
  Address Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK;  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29545373 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1817  
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Author (up) Owens, A.C.S.; Lewis, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of artificial light at night on nocturnal insects: A review and synthesis Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol  
  Volume 8 Issue 22 Pages 11337-11358  
  Keywords Animals; Review  
  Abstract In recent decades, advances in lighting technology have precipitated exponential increases in night sky brightness worldwide, raising concerns in the scientific community about the impact of artificial light at night (ALAN) on crepuscular and nocturnal biodiversity. Long-term records show that insect abundance has declined significantly over this time, with worrying implications for terrestrial ecosystems. The majority of investigations into the vulnerability of nocturnal insects to artificial light have focused on the flight-to-light behavior exhibited by select insect families. However, ALAN can affect insects in other ways as well. This review proposes five categories of ALAN impact on nocturnal insects, highlighting past research and identifying key knowledge gaps. We conclude with a summary of relevant literature on bioluminescent fireflies, which emphasizes the unique vulnerability of terrestrial light-based communication systems to artificial illumination. Comprehensive understanding of the ecological impacts of ALAN on diverse nocturnal insect taxa will enable researchers to seek out methods whereby fireflies, moths, and other essential members of the nocturnal ecosystem can coexist with humans on an increasingly urbanized planet.  
  Address Department of Biology Tufts University Medford Massachusetts  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30519447; PMCID:PMC6262936 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2132  
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