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Author Hänel, A.; Posch, T.; Ribas, S.J.; Aubé, M.; Duriscoe, D.; Jechow, A.; Kollath, Z.; Lolkema, D.E.; Moore, C.; Schmidt, N.; Spoelstra, H.; Wuchterl, G.; Kyba, C.C.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measuring night sky brightness: methods and challenges Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 205 Issue Pages 278-290  
  Keywords skyglow  
  Abstract Measuring the brightness of the night sky has become an increasingly important topic in recent years, as artificial lights and their scattering by the Earthâ??s atmosphere continue spreading around the globe. Several instruments and techniques have been developed for this task. We give an overview of these, and discuss their strengths and limitations. The different quantities that can and should be derived when measuring the night sky brightness are discussed, as well as the procedures that have been and still need to be defined in this context. We conclude that in many situations, calibrated consumer digital cameras with fisheye lenses provide the best relation between ease-of-use and wealth of obtainable information on the night sky. While they do not obtain full spectral information, they are able to sample the complete sky in a period of minutes, with colour information in three bands. This is important, as given the current global changes in lamp spectra, changes in sky radiance observed only with single band devices may lead to incorrect conclusions regarding long term changes in sky brightness. The acquisition of all-sky information is desirable, as zenith-only information does not provide an adequate characterization of a site. Nevertheless, zenith-only single-band one-channel devices such as the â??Sky Quality Meterâ? continue to be a viable option for long-term studies of night sky brightness and for studies conducted from a moving platform. Accurate interpretation of such data requires some understanding of the colour composition of the sky light. We recommend supplementing long-term time series derived with such devices with periodic all-sky sampling by a calibrated camera system and calibrated luxmeters or luminance meters.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1731  
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Author Neri, L.; Coscieme, L.; Giannetti, B.F.; Pulselli, F.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Imputing missing data in non-renewable empower time series from night-time lights observations Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ecological Indicators Abbreviated Journal Ecological Indicators  
  Volume 84 Issue Pages 106-118  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Emergy is an environmental accounting tool, with a specific set of indicators, that proved to be highly informative for sustainability assessment of national economies. The empower, defined as emergy per unit time, is a measure of the overall flow of resources used by a system in order to support its functioning. Continuous time-series of empower are not available for most of the world countries, due to the large amount of data needed for its calculation year by year. In this paper, we aim at filling this gap by means of a model that facilitates reconstruction of continuous time series of the non-renewable component of empower for a set of 57 countries of the world from 1995 to 2012. The reconstruction is based on a 3 year global emergy dataset and on the acknowledged relationships between the use of non-renewables, satellite observed artificial lights emitted at night, and Gross Domestic Product. Results show that this method provides accurate estimations of non-renewable empower at the country scale. The estimation model can be extended onward and backward in time and replicated for more countries, also using higher-resolution satellite imageries newly available. Besides representing an important advancement in emergy theory, this information is helpful for monitoring progresses toward Sustainable Development and energy use international goals.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1470160X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1706  
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Author Hasler, B.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Commentary on Bedroom Light Exposure at Night and the Incidence of Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study of the HEIJOKYO Cohort (Obayashi et al) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages 435-438  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract In modern society, we are increasingly disconnected from natural light/dark cycles and beset by round-the-clock exposure to artificial light. Light has powerful effects on physical and mental health, in part via the circadian system, and thus the timing of light exposure dictates whether it is helpful or harmful. In their compelling paper, Obayashi and colleagues offer evidence that light at night can prospectively predict an elevated incidence of depressive symptoms in older adults. Strengths of the study include the longitudinal design and direct, objective assessment of light levels, as well as accounting for multiple plausible confounders during analyses. Follow-up studies should address the study's limitations, including reliance on a global self-report of sleep quality and a two-night assessment of light exposure that may not reliably represent typical light exposure. In addition, experimental studies including physiological circadian measures will be necessary to determine if the light effects on depression are mediated through the circadian system or are so-called “direct” effects of light. In any case, these exciting findings could inform novel new approaches to preventing depressive disorders in older adults.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1716  
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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Obayashi et al. Respond to “Light at Night Predicts Depression—What Next?” Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages 439-440  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract Our research includes some strengths and limitations. The most important strength is objective measurement of light at night (LAN) intensity using a bedside light meter. Most previous studies evaluating the association between LAN and health outcomes have assessed indoor LAN levels using a self-reported questionnaire or outdoor LAN levels using satellite data; however, self-reported indoor LAN levels has not yet been validated with objective measurement and outdoor LAN levels are surrogates for an individual LAN exposure. The second strength of our study includes its longitudinal design using multivariable methods to adjust for confounders, which indicated LAN exposure may be a cause of the incidence of depressive symptoms. Indeed, the depressive score evaluated by questionnaires may be above or below the cut-off value over the short term; therefore, a long-term study considering such unstable outcomes should be conducted. In the current study, LAN exposure was measured for only two nights; thus, an amplitude of LAN intensity has been focused. However, multiple measurements over time in the future study would allow an analysis of fluctuations in LAN exposure, which might be important for circadian physiology.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1717  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Russart, K.L.G.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night as an environmental endocrine disruptor Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 190 Issue Pages 82-89  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals  
  Abstract Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are often consequences of human activity; however, the effects of EEDs are not limited to humans. A primary focus over the past approximately 30years has been on chemical EEDs, but the repercussions of non-chemical EEDs, such as artificial light at night (LAN), are of increasing interest. The sensitivity of the circadian system to light and the influence of circadian organization on overall physiology and behavior make the system a target for disruption with widespread effects. Indeed, there is increasing evidence for a role of LAN in human health, including disruption of circadian regulation and melatonin signaling, metabolic dysregulation, cancer risk, and disruption of other hormonally-driven systems. These effects are not limited to humans; domesticated animals as well as wildlife are also exposed to LAN, and at risk for disrupted circadian rhythms. Here, we review data that support the role of LAN as an endocrine disruptor in humans to be considered in treatments and lifestyle suggestions. We also present the effects of LAN in other animals, and discuss the potential for ecosystem-wide effects of artificial LAN. This can inform decisions in agricultural practices and urban lighting decisions to avoid unintended outcomes.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28870443 Approved no  
  Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1719  
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