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Author Patel, J.S.; Radetsky, L.; Rea, M.S.
Title The Value of Red Light at Night for Increasing Basil Yield Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Canadian Journal of Plant Science Abbreviated Journal Can. J. Plant Sci.
Volume 98 Issue 6 Pages (down) 1321-1330
Keywords Plants
Abstract Sweet basil (<i>Ocimum basilicum L.</i>) is primarily used for culinary purposes, but it is also used in the fragrance and medicinal industries. In the last few years, global sweet basil production has been significantly impacted by downy mildew caused by <i>Peronospora belbahrii</i>. Nighttime exposure to red light has been shown to inhibit sporulation of <i>P. belbahrii</i>. The objective of this study was to determine if nighttime exposure to red light from light-emitting diodes (LEDs; λ<sub>max</sub> = 625 nm) could increase plant growth (plant height and leaf size) and yield (number and weight of leaves) in basil plants. In two sets of greenhouse experiments, red light was applied at a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 60 µmol m<sup>-2</sup> s<sup>-1</sup> during the otherwise dark night for 10 hours (from 20:00 to 06:00). The results demonstrate that exposure to red light at night can increase the number of basil leaves per plant, plant height, leaf size (length and width), and leaf fresh and dry weight, compared to plants in darkness at night. The addition of incremental red light at night has the potential to be cost-effective for fresh organic basil production in controlled environments.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0008-4220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1955
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Author Uysal, C.; Maktav, D.; Small, C.
Title Mapping Urban Growth and Its Relation to Seismic Hazards in Istanbul Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J Indian Soc Remote Sens
Volume 46 Issue 8 Pages (down) 1307-1322
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract In Istanbul, one of the most densely populated cities of Turkey, the population has grown rapidly over the last 30 years. In addition to being one of the rapidly flourishing cities in Europe, the city is positioned on the seismically active North Anatolian Fault (NAF). The form and rate of Istanbul’s fast urban growth has serious implications for seismic hazards. There have been some studies to map lateral urban growth for the city but they do not give satisfactory information about vertical urban growth and seismic hazards. We use DMSP night lights and Landsat data to map changes in land cover-land use in and around the city since 1984, and determine relations of these changes with the NAF. Changes in land use and intensity of development are identified by changes in night light brightness while changes in land cover are identified by changes in land surface reflectance. Aggregate changes in reflectance are represented as changes in subpixel mixtures of the most functionally and spectrally distinct spectral endmembers of land cover. Using standardized global endmembers, SVD composite images were produced for 1984, 2000 and 2011 and fraction change (δSVD) maps were produced for the decadal intervals. The results show that most of the urban expansion has occurred near the NAF. This has serious implications for seismic hazards in the future if the progression of large earthquakes continues to move westward toward the city.
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0255-660X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2078
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Author Gaynor, K.M.; Hojnowski, C.E.; Carter, N.H.; Brashares, J.S.
Title The influence of human disturbance on wildlife nocturnality Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 360 Issue 6394 Pages (down) 1232-1235
Keywords
Abstract Rapid expansion of human activity has driven well-documented shifts in the spatial distribution of wildlife, but the cumulative effect of human disturbance on the temporal dynamics of animals has not been quantified. We examined anthropogenic effects on mammal diel activity patterns, conducting a meta-analysis of 76 studies of 62 species from six continents. Our global study revealed a strong effect of humans on daily patterns of wildlife activity. Animals increased their nocturnality by an average factor of 1.36 in response to human disturbance. This finding was consistent across continents, habitats, taxa, and human activities. As the global human footprint expands, temporal avoidance of humans may facilitate human-wildlife coexistence. However, such responses can result in marked shifts away from natural patterns of activity, with consequences for fitness, population persistence, community interactions, and evolution.
Address Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher AAAS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29903973 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1988
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Author Rybnikova, N.; Portnov, B.A.
Title Population-level study links short-wavelength nighttime illumination with breast cancer incidence in a major metropolitan area Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 35 Issue 9 Pages (down) 1198-1208
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Several population-level studies revealed a positive association between breast cancer (BC) incidence and artificial light at night (ALAN) exposure. However, the effect of short-wavelength illumination, implicated by laboratory research and small-scale cohort studies as the main driving force behind BC-ALAN association, has not been supported by any population-level study carried out to date. We investigated a possible link between BC and ALAN of different subspectra using a multi-spectral year-2011 satellite image, taken from the International Space Station, and superimposing it with year-2013 BC incidence data available for the Great Haifa Metropolitan Area in Israel. The analysis was performed using both ordinary least square (OLS) and spatial dependency models, controlling for socioeconomic and locational attributes of the study area. The study revealed strong associations between BC and blue and green light subspectra (B = 0.336 +/- 0.001 and B = 0.335 +/- 0.002, respectively; p < 0.01), compared to a somewhat weaker effect for the red subspectrum (B = 0.056 +/- 0.001; p < 0.01). However, spatial dependency models, controlling for spatial autocorrelation of regression residuals, confirmed only a positive association between BC incidence and short-wavelength (blue) ALAN subspectrum (z = 2.462, p < 0.05) while reporting insignificant associations between BC and either green (z = 1.425, p > 0.1) or red (z = -0.604, p > 0.1) subspectra. The obtained result is in line with the results of laboratory- and small-scale cohort studies linking short-wavelength nighttime illumination with circadian disruption and melatonin suppression. The detected effect of blue lights on BC incidence may help to develop informed illumination policies aimed at minimizing the adverse health effects of ALAN exposure on human health.
Address a Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management , University of Haifa , Haifa , Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29768068 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1906
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Author Brelsford, CC; Robson, TM
Title Blue light advances bud burst in branches of three deciduous tree species under short-day conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Trees Abbreviated Journal
Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages (down) 1157-1164
Keywords Plants
Abstract During spring, utilising multiple cues allow tree species from temperate and boreal regions to coordinate their bud burst and leaf out, at the right moment to capitalise on favourable conditions for photosynthesis. Whilst the effect of blue light (400–500 nm) has been shown to increase percentage bud burst of axillary shoots of Rosa sp., the effects of blue light on spring-time bud burst of deciduous tree species have not previously been reported. We tested the hypotheses that blue light would advance spring bud burst in tree species, and that late-successional species would respond more than early-successional species, whose bud burst is primarily determined by temperature. The bud development of Alnus glutinosa, Betula pendula, and Quercus robur branches, cut from dormant trees, was monitored under two light treatments of equal photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400–700 nm) and temperature, either with or without blue light, under controlled environmental conditions. In the presence of blue light, the mean time required to reach 50% bud burst was reduced by 3.3 days in Betula pendula, 6 days in Alnus glutinosa, and 6.3 days in Quercus robur. This result highlights the potential of the blue region of the solar spectrum to be used as an extra cue that could help plants to regulate their spring phenology, alongside photoperiod and temperature. Understanding how plants combine photoreceptor-mediated cues with other environmental cues such as temperature to control phenology is essential if we are to accurately predict how tree species might respond to climate change.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1847
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