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Author Madahi, P.-G.; Ivan, O.; Adriana, B.; Diana, O.; Carolina, E.
Title Constant light during lactation programs circadian and metabolic systems Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 35 Issue 8 Pages (down) 1153-1167
Keywords Animals
Abstract Exposure to light at night is a disruptive condition for the adult circadian system, leading to arrhythmicity in nocturnal rodents. Circadian disruption is a risk factor for developing physiological and behavioral alterations, including weight gain and metabolic disease. During early stages of development, the circadian system undergoes a critical period of adjustment, and it is especially vulnerable to altered lighting conditions that may program its function, leading to long-term effects. We hypothesized that during lactation a disrupted light-dark cycle due to light at night may disrupt the circadian system and in the long term induce metabolic disorders. Here we explored in pups, short- and long-term effects of constant light (LL) during lactation. In the short term, LL caused a loss of rhythmicity and a reduction in the immunopositive cells of VIP, AVP, and PER1 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In the short term, the affection on the circadian clock in the pups resulted in body weight gain, loss of daily rhythms in general activity, plasma glucose and triglycerides (TG). Importantly, the DD conditions during development also induced altered daily rhythms in general activity and in the SCN. Exposure to LD conditions after lactation did not restore rhythmicity in the SCN, and the number of immunopositve cells to VIP, AVP, and PER1 remained reduced. In the long term, daily rhythmicity in general activity was restored; however, daily rhythms in glucose and TG remained disrupted, and daily mean levels of TG were significantly increased. Present results point out the programming role played by the LD cycle during early development in the function of the circadian system and on metabolism. This study points out the risk represented by exposure to an altered light-dark cycle during early stages of development. ABBREVIATIONS: AVP: arginine vasopressin peptide; CRY: cryptochrome; DD: constant darkness; DM: dorsomedial; LD: light-dark cycle; LL: constant light; NICUs: neonatal intensive care units; P: postnatal days; PER: period; S.E.M.: standard error of the mean; SCN: suprachiasmatic nucleus; TG: triglycerides; VIP: vasointestinal peptide; VL: ventrolateral; ZT: zeitgeber time.
Address a Facultad de Medicina , Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM , Mexico City , Mexico
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29688088 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1884
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Author Bowne, D.R.; Cosentino, B.J.; Anderson, L.J.; Bloch, C.P.; Cooke, S.; Crumrine, P.W.; Dallas, J.; Doran, A.; Dosch, J.J.; Druckenbrod, D.L.; Durtsche, R.D.; Garneau, D.; Genet, K.S.; Fredericksen, T.S.; Kish, P.A.; Kolozsvary, M.B.; Kuserk, F.T.; Lindquist, E.S.; Mankiewicz, C.; March, J.G.; Muir, T.J.; Murray, K.G.; Santulli, M.N.; Sicignano, F.J.; Smallwood, P.D.; Urban, R.A.; Winnett-Murray, K.; Zimmermann, C.R.
Title Effects of urbanization on the population structure of freshwater turtles across the United States Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Conservation Biology : the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Biol
Volume 32 Issue 5 Pages (down) 1150-1161
Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing
Abstract Landscape-scale alterations that accompany urbanization may negatively affect the population structure of wildlife species such as freshwater turtles. Changes to nesting sites and higher mortality rates due to vehicular collisions and increased predator populations may particularly affect immature turtles and mature female turtles. We hypothesized that the proportions of adult female and immature turtles in a population will negatively correlate with landscape urbanization. As a collaborative effort of the Ecological Research as Education Network (EREN), we sampled freshwater turtle populations in 11 states across the central and eastern United States. Contrary to expectations, we found a significant positive relationship between proportions of mature female painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) and urbanization. We did not detect a relationship between urbanization and proportions of immature turtles. Urbanization may alter the thermal environment of nesting sites such that more females are produced as urbanization increases. Our approach of creating a collaborative network of scientists and students at undergraduate institutions proved valuable in terms of testing our hypothesis over a large spatial scale while also allowing students to gain hands-on experience in conservation science. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Department of Biology, Rogers State University, 1701 W. Will Rogers Boulevard, Claremore, OK 74017, U.S.A
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0888-8892 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29781169 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1920
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Author Ma, T.
Title Multi-Level Relationships between Satellite-Derived Nighttime Lighting Signals and Social Media–Derived Human Population Dynamics Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 10 Issue 7 Pages (down) 1128
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Satellite-based measurements of the artificial nighttime light brightness (NTL) have been extensively used for studying urbanization and socioeconomic dynamics in a temporally consistent and spatially explicit manner. The increasing availability of geo-located big data detailing human population dynamics provides a good opportunity to explore the association between anthropogenic nocturnal luminosity and corresponding human activities, especially at fine time/space scales. In this study, we used Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) day/night band (DNB)–derived nighttime light images and the gridded number of location requests (NLR) from China’s largest social media platform to investigate the quantitative relationship between nighttime light radiances and human population dynamics across China at four levels: the provincial, city, county, and pixel levels. Our results show that the linear relationship between the NTL and NLR might vary with the observation level and magnitude. The dispersion between the two variables likely increases with the observation scale, especially at the pixel level. The effect of spatial autocorrelation and other socioeconomic factors on the relationship should be taken into account for nighttime light-based measurements of human activities. Furthermore, the bivariate relationship between the NTL and NLR was employed to generate a partition of human settlements based on the combined features of nighttime lights and human population dynamics. Cross-regional comparisons of the partitioned results indicate a diverse co-distribution of the NTL and NLR across various types of human settlements, which could be related to the city size/form and urbanization level. Our findings may provide new insights into the multi-level responses of nighttime light signals to human activity and the potential application of nighttime light data in association with geo-located big data for investigating the spatial patterns of human settlement.
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1996
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Author Pan, J.; Hu, Y.
Title Spatial Identification of Multi-dimensional Poverty in Rural China: A Perspective of Nighttime-Light Remote Sensing Data Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J Indian Soc Remote Sens
Volume 46 Issue 7 Pages (down) 1093-1111
Keywords Remote sensing
Abstract Poverty has emerged as one of the chronic dilemmas facing the development of human society during the twenty first century. Accurately identifying regions of poverty could lead to more effective poverty-alleviation programs. This study used a new type of remote-sensing data, NPP-VIIRS, to locate poverty-stricken areas based on nighttime light, taking Chongqing Municipality as a sample, and constructed a multidimensional poverty index (MPI) system, guided by a well-known and widely used conceptual framework of sustainable livelihood. A regression model was constructed and results were correlated with those using the average nighttime light index. The model was then tested on Shaanxi Province, and average relative error of the estimated MPI was only 11.12%. These results showed that multidimensional poverty had a high spatial concentration effect at the regional scale. We then applied the index nationwide, at the county scale, analyzing 2852 counties, which we divided into seven classifications, based on the MPI: extremely low, low, relatively low, medium, relatively high, high, and extremely high. Eight hundred forty-eight counties in 26 provinces were identified as multidimensionally poor. Among these, 254 were absolutely poor counties and 543 were relatively poor counties; 195 of these are not on the list of poverty-stricken counties as identified by income levels alone. By improving the accuracy of targeting, this method of identifying multidimensional poverty areas could help the Chinese government improve the effectiveness of poverty reduction strategies, and it could also be used as a reference for other countries or regions that seek to target poor areas that suffer multidimensional deprivation.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0255-660X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2095
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Author Giraudeau, M.; Sepp, T.; Ujvari, B.; Ewald, P.W.; Thomas, F.
Title Human activities might influence oncogenic processes in wild animal populations Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Nat Ecol Evol
Volume 2 Issue Pages (down) 1065-1070
Keywords Commentary; Animals
Abstract Based on the abundant studies available on humans showing clear associations between rapid environmental changes and the rate of neoplasia, we propose that human activities might increase cancer rate in wild populations through numerous processes. Most of the research on this topic has concentrated on wildlife cancer prevalence in environments that are heavily contaminated with anthropogenic chemicals. Here, we propose that human activities might also increase cancer rate in wild populations through additional processes including light pollution, accidental (for example, human waste) or intentional (for example, bird feeders) wildlife feeding (and the associated change of diet), or reduction of genetic diversity in human-impacted habitats. The human species can thus be defined as an oncogenic species, moderating the environment in the way that it causes cancer in other wild populations. As human impacts on wildlife are predicted to increase rather than decrease (for example, in the context of urbanization), acknowledging the possible links between human activity and cancer in wild populations is crucial.
Address MIVEGEC, Montpellier, France. frederic.thomas2@ird.fr
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2397-334X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29784981 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1921
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