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Author Neri, L.; Coscieme, L.; Giannetti, B.F.; Pulselli, F.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Imputing missing data in non-renewable empower time series from night-time lights observations Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ecological Indicators Abbreviated Journal Ecological Indicators  
  Volume 84 Issue Pages (down) 106-118  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Emergy is an environmental accounting tool, with a specific set of indicators, that proved to be highly informative for sustainability assessment of national economies. The empower, defined as emergy per unit time, is a measure of the overall flow of resources used by a system in order to support its functioning. Continuous time-series of empower are not available for most of the world countries, due to the large amount of data needed for its calculation year by year. In this paper, we aim at filling this gap by means of a model that facilitates reconstruction of continuous time series of the non-renewable component of empower for a set of 57 countries of the world from 1995 to 2012. The reconstruction is based on a 3 year global emergy dataset and on the acknowledged relationships between the use of non-renewables, satellite observed artificial lights emitted at night, and Gross Domestic Product. Results show that this method provides accurate estimations of non-renewable empower at the country scale. The estimation model can be extended onward and backward in time and replicated for more countries, also using higher-resolution satellite imageries newly available. Besides representing an important advancement in emergy theory, this information is helpful for monitoring progresses toward Sustainable Development and energy use international goals.  
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  ISSN 1470160X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1706  
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Author Lowden, A.; Lemos, N.; Gonçalves, B.; Öztürk, G.; Louzada, F.; Pedrazzoli, M.; Moreno, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Delayed Sleep in Winter Related to Natural Daylight Exposure among Arctic Day Workers Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages (down) 105-116  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Natural daylight exposures in arctic regions vary substantially across seasons. Negative consequences have been observed in self-reports of sleep and daytime functions during the winter but have rarely been studied in detail. The focus of the present study set out to investigate sleep seasonality among indoor workers using objective and subjective measures. Sleep seasonality among daytime office workers (n = 32) in Kiruna (Sweden, 67.86° N, 20.23° E) was studied by comparing the same group of workers in a winter and summer week, including work and days off at the weekend, using actigraphs (motion loggers) and subjective ratings of alertness and mood. Actigraph analyses showed delayed sleep onset of 39 min in winter compared to the corresponding summer week (p < 0.0001) and shorter weekly sleep duration by 12 min (p = 0.0154). A delay of mid-sleep was present in winter at workdays (25 min, p < 0.0001) and more strongly delayed during days off (46 min, p < 0.0001). Sleepiness levels were higher in winter compared to summer (p < 0.05). Increased morning light exposure was associated with earlier mid-sleep (p < 0.001), while increased evening light exposure was associated with delay (p < 0.01). This study confirms earlier work that suggests that lack of natural daylight delays the sleep/wake cycle in a group of indoor workers, despite having access to electric lighting. Photic stimuli resulted in a general advanced sleep/wake rhythm during summer and increased alertness levels.  
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  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2137  
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Author Xu, Y.; Knudby, A.; Côté-Lussier, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping ambient light at night using field observations and high-resolution remote sensing imagery for studies of urban environments Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment  
  Volume 145 Issue Pages (down) 104-114  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Artificial lighting allows for a variety of activities to take place in the absence of sunlight, but also has an increasingly recognized range of negative social and health-related effects. For studies of urban ambient light at night (ALN), objective and standardized data on the amount of ALN experienced by people is often unavailable at the necessary intra-urban spatial scale. In this paper, we outline options for producing such data through (1) field observations acquired with a luminance meter mounted on a vehicle, (2) a 1-m resolution image mosaic produced from a dedicated aerial survey, and (3) a 50-m resolution image taken from the International Space Station. We produce two remote sensing-derived maps of ALN for a large urban area in Canada, and compare their spatial detail to the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness, a publicly available alternative data source. Convergent validity with field observations suggests that both mapping approaches can be used to quantify the amount of light humans are exposed to at night, at different locations across a large urban area, and may thus aid in further studying the varied effects of artificial nighttime lighting.  
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  ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1998  
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Author Al Zahrani, M.H.; Omar, A.I.; Abdoon, A.M.O.; Ibrahim, A.A.; Alhogail, A.; Elmubarak, M.; Elamin, Y.E.; AlHelal, M.A.; Alshahrani, A.M.; Abdelgader, T.M.; Saeed, I.; El Gamri, T.B.; Alattas, M.S.; Dahlan, A.A.; Assiri, A.M.; Maina, J.; Li, X.H.; Snow, R.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cross-border movement, economic development and malaria elimination in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMC Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages (down) 98  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health  
  Abstract Malaria at international borders presents particular challenges with regards to elimination. International borders share common malaria ecologies, yet neighboring countries are often at different stages of the control-to-elimination pathway. Herein, we present a case study on malaria, and its control, at the border between Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Malaria program activity reports, case data, and ancillary information have been assembled from national health information systems, archives, and other related sources. Information was analyzed as a semi-quantitative time series, between 2000 and 2017, to provide a plausibility framework to understand the possible contributions of factors related to control activities, conflict, economic development, migration, and climate. The malaria recession in the Yemeni border regions of Saudi Arabia is a likely consequence of multiple, coincidental factors, including scaled elimination activities, cross-border vector control, periods of low rainfall, and economic development. The temporal alignment of many of these factors suggests that economic development may have changed the receptivity to the extent that it mitigated against surges in vulnerability posed by imported malaria from its endemic neighbor Yemen. In many border areas of the world, malaria is likely to be sustained through a complex congruence of factors, including poverty, conflict, and migration.  
  Address Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. rsnow@kemri-wellcome.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1741-7015 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29940950 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1948  
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Author Guetté, A.; Godet, L.; Juigner, M.; Robin, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Worldwide increase in Artificial Light At Night around protected areas and within biodiversity hotspots Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 223 Issue Pages (down) 97-103  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Ecology; Conservation  
  Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) has several adverse impacts on biodiversity, and it has been recently used as a proxy to monitor human encroachment on landscapes at large spatial scales. The extent to which ALAN affects protected areas (PAs) and biodiversity hotspots (BHs) remains however untested at large spatial scales. We used this proxy to assess the spatial and temporal trends in the anthropization at a global scale within and around PAs and BHs. We found that ALAN is low and stable over time within PAs, but is the highest in a first outer belt (<25 km) around PAs, and tends to increase in a second outer belt (25–75 km). In the meantime, ALAN is higher within BHs than outside, and is even the highest and increasing over time in an inner belt, close to their periphery. Our results suggest that although PAs are creating safety zones in terms of ALAN, they tend to be more and more isolated from each other by a concentric human encroachment. In contrast, BHs are submitted to an increasing human pressure, especially in their inner periphery. Overall, we suggest integrating ALAN in large-scale conservation policies.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1890  
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